You are browsing the archive for 2011 January.

And the winner is…

January 31, 2011 in News

Congratulations to the winner of our January competition.

Mark_Bryant_WW2_in_cartoons @ http://www.thebloghorn.org for the UK Professional Cartoonists Organisation

Mark Bryant WW2 in cartoons

We hope Stuart Cooper will enjoy his copy of Mark Bryant’s excellent book – World War 2 in cartoons. Stuart correctly answered questions one, two and three and in strictly sequential order those answers were:

Question 1. Careless Talk (profile)

Question 2. Bruce Bairnsfather (profile)

Question 3. Ronald Searle (profile)

The book is now winging its way to our victorious reader in Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire.

Thanks to everyone who entered and we are sorry there could only be one victor this time.

Cartoonists at large

January 28, 2011 in News

One of Bloghorn’s regular contributors, Royston Robertson has a cartoon in a rather unusual exhibition. The Great Wall of Ramsgate is a 1000ft-long temporary wall that’s been erected around the site of an old amusement park during redevelopment. In an effort to brighten it up a bit, local artists, photographers and cartoonists have been invited to add their own contribution, in the shape of a series of 4ft by 8ft boards.

Royston’s no stranger to working on such a large scale, having drawn for the Big Boards at Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival in 2007 and 2008, and was on the team representing Bloghorn at this year’s Battle of the Cartoonists. Keep your eye on Bloghorn for news on the cartoonists who’ll be Big Boarding at this year’s Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival in April.

Martin Rowson, who produced one of last years Big Boards at Shrewsbury, will be speaking at the Frontline Club, 13 Norfolk Place, London W2 1QJ next week on the subject of Caricatures and Commentary. Tickets are available for the event on Tuesday 1st February, 7-9pm, priced £12.50 (£10 for early birds, £8 for concessions) here.

Cartoon contest is no laughing matter

January 25, 2011 in Comment

PCO cartoonist John Jensen takes a look at a Turkish cartoon competition:

Cartoon by Ahmet Ozturklevent

Turkey recently staged its 27th Aydin Dogan International Cartoon Competition and a 255-page catalogue was released, beautifully printed throughout in colour, with text in Turkish and English.

There’s a long list of successful exhibitors – 44 countries are represented – and a much longer list of entrants who did not get past the judges.

There are 127 Turkish cartoonists and a random count reveals that Serbia is represented by 35 entrants, China by 53 and Iran by 122. Four UK cartoonists participated but only Ross Thomson has survived, to exhibit two drawings.

The three UK cartoonists, who did not make it are Houmayon Mahmoudi, Stephen Mumberson and Alexei Talimonov. Maybe they didn’t draw enough brick walls and prison bars, of which there were plenty.

The first-prize winner, by Turkish cartoonist Ahmet Ozturklevent, is pictured above.

There is an overall sense of stifling bureaucracy while the threat of violence, usually implicit, is a common theme. There are few, if any, English-style jokes. Even Ross Thomson succumbed to drawing a couple of tanks, but at least they are not avoiding daisies.

In the exhibition there are messages galore for mankind – which mankind will almost certainly ignore.

The quality of much of the draughtsmanship is undeniable. The contestants can think, they can draw and they can be very witty indeed, but English-style humour, they would claim, is not part of their job description.

January Monday Prize Competition No3

January 24, 2011 in Comment

It is time for the last question in our January Monday quiz.

Mark_Bryant_WW2_in_cartoons @ http://www.thebloghorn.org for the UK Professional Cartoonists Organisation

Mark Bryant WW2 in cartoons

You can win a copy of Mark Bryant’s excellent book – World War 2 in cartoons.

Answer questions one, two and three before Friday 28th January. Email the editor the correct answers and you’ll go into a prize draw for the illustrated book. The winner will be announced next Monday.

The draw will be conducted in an old paint pot at one of Bloghorn’s many residences and the editor’s decision will be final. Bloghorn regrets entrants are restricted to UK based applicants. There will be a winner by the end of the month.

And at last, here is question three

“Which renowned British cartoonist was incarcerated in Japanese prisoner of war camps in Singapore and Burma?

Email your answers to all three questions to the editor by Friday 28th January to enter. Good luck!

Express yourself

January 21, 2011 in Comment

The cartoonist behind the award-winning webcomic Lackadaisy, Tracy J. Butler, has produced a brief guide to drawing expressions. The guide, which includes tips about unlearning bad habits, reference, loose sketching and, of course, practice is one of a number of guides showing how Butler produces, draws, colours and finishes her comic.

Lackadaisy, the story of anthropomorphic cats in the speakeasies of Prohibition-era St Louis has been appearing online since 2006, was recently published in book form and can be read for free from the start here.

From Herriman to Holte: Another ten great cartoonists

January 19, 2011 in Comment

The cartoonist Gerald Scarfe has made a list of his ten favourite cartoonists, for the Daily Mail website. It includes some inarguable choices as well as some surprising ones.

Ronald Searle, widely regarded as Britain’s best living cartoonist, is on there. There are also choices from the worlds of fine art, such as Picasso, and film-making, which is represented by Walt Disney, more for his skill at getting great work from others than his own drawing talents.

We asked members of the Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation, which runs the Bloghorn, to name their favourite cartoonists not on the Scarfe list. It’s not a poll, or a “top ten”, just an informal list of another ten great artists, and it shows the wealth of variety and creativity to be found in the world of cartooning.

Hector Breeze cartoon

1. Hector Breeze (Born 1928). Picked by Pete Dredge: “A master of the pocket cartoon. Out of the mouths of his mundane, benign, chunkily drawn characters comes the sharpest of captions.”

Robert Crumb cartoon

2. Robert Crumb (Born 1943). Picked by Royston Robertson: “He has been satirising the way we live since the 1960s with his dense, inky, cross-hatched drawings, displaying human folly in all its gory glory. Not for nothing was he described by the art critics Robert Hughes as ‘the Bruegel of the last half of the 20th century’.”

George Grosz painting

3. George Grosz (1893-1959). Picked by Matt Buck and Andrew Birch (both blatantly ignoring the brief of people not on Scarfe’s list, Bloghorn notes!) Matt says: “Grosz drew with an unsparing eye and produced powerful reflections of what people do rather than what they say they do.” Andrew adds: “For me German Expressionism was one of the most important art movements of the 20th century, whose brutal and honest line laid the foundation for many later cartoonists like Steadman.”

Heath Robinson cartoon

4. William Heath Robinson (1872-1944). Picked by Rupert Besley: “He was an original, creating a wonderful, instantly recognisable world of his own. He satirised the growth of mechanisation, but did so in a gloriously enjoyable way that always kept the human at the centre of it all. Which other cartoonist has added his name to the language and booked his place in every dictionary?”

George Herriman cartoon

5. George Herriman (1880-1944). Picked by Wilbur Dawbarn: “From the gorgeously scratchy line work and absolute poetry of the writing in the early years, to the sheer majesty of composition in the latter years, Herriman’s Sunday Krazy Kat pages are, to my mind, some of the finest examples of comic art ever penned.”

Holte cartoon

6. Trevor Holder, aka “Holte” (Born 1941). Picked by Roger Penwill: “Glorious technique, a master of expressive line and a very funny, wicked sense of humour. Some of his cartoons are timeless classics.”

Kliban cartoon

7. Bernard Kliban (1935-1990). Picked by Chris Madden: “I came across a book by B. Kliban: Cat Dreams. I’m not sure what they’re about. I’m not even sure if they’re funny (do cartoons actually have to be funny?) But they’re brilliant. Apparently he grew to detest drawing cats in the end, but they were what everybody wanted. Beware success.”

David Law cartoon

8. David Law (1908-1971). Picked by Steve Bright: “Beautifully fluid and loose line, amazing perspectives and angles, and the master of life and motion in all that he drew. Law inspired millions of kids to pick up a pencil through his marvellous work in the Beano, Dandy and Topper.”

Phil May cartoon

9. Phil May (1864-1903). Picked by Mike Turner: “A breakthrough in culling captions down to a minimum. Great art, brilliant caricatures, sheer good humour relating to ‘the man in the street’ or the ‘man on the horse-drawn omnibus’

Bill Tidy cartoon

10. Bill Tidy (Born 1933). Picked by Bill Stott: “For his excellent gags and consummate drawing, especially in his history-based stuff.”

What do you think of the list? Got a favourite cartoonist you’d like to add to it? Let us know in the comments below.

January Monday Prize Competition No2.

January 17, 2011 in Comment

It is time for the second question in our January Monday quiz.

Mark_Bryant_WW2_in_cartoons @ http://www.thebloghorn.org for the UK Professional Cartoonists Organisation

Mark Bryant WW2 in cartoons

Win a copy of Mark Bryant’s excellent book – World War 2 in cartoons.

The draw will take place after the last question is posted on Monday 24th Jan. Email the editor after that with the correct answers and you’ll go into a prize draw for the illustrated book.

The draw will be conducted in an old paint pot at one of Bloghorn’s many residences and the editor’s decision will be final. Bloghorn regrets entrants are restricted to UK based applicants. There will be a winner by the end of the month.

And at last, here’s question two

Whose cartoon character from World War One uttered the immortal line “If you know a better hole-go to it?”

The final question and the opportunity to enter the competition next Monday.

Capital cartooning

January 15, 2011 in News

Bloghorn notes some new cartoon-related events coming soon to London town.

There’s an exhibition of the cartoons Ronald Searle drew for his wife, Les Très Riches Heures de Mrs. Mole, while she was undergoing chemotherapy, accompanied by a talk on Searle’s life by Valerie Grove on Tuesday, 15 February 2011 at The Foundling Museum, 40 Brunswick Square, London, WC1N 1AZ. Tickets are £20, books and signed prints will be on sale, with proceeds going to Macmillan Cancer Support and The Foundling Museum. (Thanks to the Ronald Searle Tribute blog for the tip)

There’s free comic workshops on offer for 16-20 year olds at londonprintstudio, 425 Harrow Road, London W10 4RE on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from the 18th January. There’s a £5 booking fee, but this will be reimbursed on arrival. Visit www.londonprintstudio.org.uk for more information or call 020 8969 3247 to book. (thanks to downthetubes.net for the tip)

And finally, the Comix Reader, is having a launch party upstairs at the Crown, 51 New Oxford Street, London WC1A 1BL on the 2nd February. The publication, described as “Underground Alternative Independent Satirical Carnivalesque Comix Entertainment” is already on sale for £1 at a number of stockists.

We  are sure there are many other events across the country and we would welcome news of them as readers see them. You can contact us here or using our social media outlets.

Profile photo of Royston

by Royston

Cartoonists doing it for themselves

January 11, 2011 in News

Cartoon by Huw Aaron
Cartoonists are continuing to use the print-on-demand services provided by various websites to get their work out there.

These sites mean that they can print collections of their drawings as and when they are needed, so they don’t end up with boxes full of unsold books cluttering up their sheds.

While the cartoonists probably won’t get rich off these books, they can work well as a “calling card” for potential clients, a kind of mini portfolio. And, crucially, they allow cartoonists to sell their books online.
Cartoon book by Huw Aaron

Huw Aaron is the latest to use this model, producing a book of joke cartoons published in magazines such as Private Eye, Reader’s Digest and The Oldie in 2010, plus a few unpublished cartoons. The book is called Does This Breastplate Make Me Look Fat? He has also produced a book compiling cartoons from 2009, his first as a professional cartoonist, called Gentlemen, I’m Off to Join the Circus. Bloghorn cornered Huw to ask him a few questions …

You’re relatively new to the world of cartooning, why did you decide to do not one, but two cartoon books at this stage?

My intent from the start was to produce a collection each year of my full-time cartooning career. After one year, I was already a year behind schedule. I’ve now managed to catch up.

The first book comes with a recommendation from Richard Ingrams, editor of The Oldie. Fair enough. But also … Jilly Cooper?! How did that come about?

I had a lovely phone call from Ms Cooper last year, asking to buy a cartoon of mine she’d seen in The Oldie. As my only celebrity “fan”, she was a clear choice when looking for a few words to stick on the back cover!

You seem to be trying out lots of different drawing styles, particularly in the first book. Is that deliberate or do you just go with what feels right?

I do think that an “Aaron look” is slowly emerging, but until it does, I hope there’s enough humour in these collections to make up for the mishmash of styles.

Does This Breastplate Make Me Look Fat? and Gentlemen, I’m off to Join the Circus can be purchased online at Lulu.com for £5.99 each in paperback, or £1.99 each for a digital copy.

January Monday Prize Competition No1.

January 10, 2011 in Comment

It is January and the winter blues need chasing away, so cheer yourself with our winter quiz.

Mark_Bryant_WW2_in_cartoons @ http://www.thebloghorn.org for the UK Professional Cartoonists Organisation

Mark Bryant WW2 in cartoons

If you can answer the three questions to come today and over the next two Mondays, you’ll go into a prize draw for a copy of Mark Bryant’s excellent book – World War 2 in cartoons.

Simple as that.

Contestants enter the draw by answering the questions by email to the editor after the last question is posted on 24th Jan. The draw will be conducted in an old paint pot at one of Bloghorn’s many residences and the editor’s decision is final. A winner by the end of the Month.

And here’s question one

In the Second World War poster campaign created by the Punch cartoonist Kenneth Bird, aka Fougasse, what was said to cost lives?

Question two next Monday.