You are browsing the archive for 2011 July.

Round up: What the Bloghorn saw

July 29, 2011 in News

Rob Murray writes:

With Steve Bell’s one-man restrospective at the Cartoon Museum having just closed, the Guardian cartoonist – and member of the UK Professional Cartoonists Organisation, which runs the Bloghorn – has been awarded an honorary degree from the University of Brighton.

New Yorker cartoonist Ed Koren has been interviewed by Vermont Public Radio about his long career, his writing process and his views on the future of cartooning. You can listen to the 12-minute interview here.

Acclaimed comics writer Alan Moore tells the Guardian about the latest installment of his League of Extraordinary Gentlemen series (published this week), and how he thinks the internet will transform comics. Read the interview here.

Staying in the realm of comic books, Robert Crumb’s classic underground series Zap Comix is due to be reprinted in its entirety next year, in an 800-page, two-volume hardcover set from Fantagraphics Books.

As always, please draw our attention to anything you think we’ve missed by posting a comment below.

 

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by Royston

Doctor Who at the Cartoon Museum

July 26, 2011 in Events

Doctor Who in Comics exhibitionAlmost as long as Doctor Who has been on — and off — our TV screens he has also been seen in his comics incarnation.

The world’s longest running sci-fi series began in late 1963 and the Doctor first appeared in cartoon form in TV Comic in the following year.

A new exhibition, Doctor Who in Comics: 1964-2011 brings together artwork featuring all eleven Doctors from publications including TV Comic, TV Century 21 and Doctor Who Magazine. Comic-strips were famously one of the mediums that kept the Doctor alive for the fans when the TV show was off the air for 16 years — yes, excepting Paul McGann’s one-off TV film, don’t write in! — between 1989 and 2005.

The show, which materialises at the Cartoon Museum in London on Wednesday, features work by many writers and artists including Brian Bolland, Dave Gibbons, Dicky Howett, Roger Langridge, David Lloyd, Pat Mills, Alan Moore and John Wagner. It looks set to be a family hit for all generations over the summer. Catch it before it dematerialises on October 30.

Artwork above by Paul Grist and James Offredi

Round up : What the Bloghorn saw

July 22, 2011 in Comment, News

Rob Murray writes:

A handsome new book about the use of cartoons in early advertising is released this month by graphic novel and comic art publisher Fantagraphics Books. In 128 full-colur pages, Drawing Power spans from the 1870s to the 1940s and features lesser-known work by cartoonists such as Peter Arno, Thomas Nast, George Herriman and Dr Seuss. More information on the book, including a slideshow of many of the cartoons featured, can be found here.

The News International phone-hacking scandal has made headlines around the world, and reminds Vancouver Sun writer Darah Hansen of a classic Doonesbury strip, as she explains here.

Judge Dredd, the iconic star of long-running UK sci-fi comic 2000 AD, is getting a second chance at movie stardom – this time without Sylvester Stallone – in a new film due early next year.

Last but by no means least, the UK Professional Cartoonists Organisation – which runs the Bloghorn – has this week unveiled its portfolio website. Take a look, if you haven’t already. We will be moving to the new site in due course.

Cartooning in real-time

July 21, 2011 in Events, News

Response to printed and digital cartoons is now pretty much instant as this tweet about a drawing by Peter Brookes of The Times shows.

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Peter’s colleague Morten Morland (a PCO member) had a swift response below

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The standard response of editorial cartoonists to feedback like this is

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Or complete silence, but when the controversy crosses the oceans in seconds to other influential commentators…

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This speed of interaction between opinion, response and offence  pose, in Bloghorn’s view both a challenge and an opportunity to makers of drawings. What do you think cartoonists should do in the social media era?Answers welcome in the comments.

Updated: 2pm

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Further response from the internet

Updated: Wednesday 27th JulyThe Guardian is reporting a letter from seven UK academics complaining about the publication of this cartoon. Read the story here and please comment below if you would like.

Foghorn Cartoon Magazine – No. 51

July 19, 2011 in News

Summer is here and our thoughts turn to holidays, so the latest issue of Foghorn, the magazine of the Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation, looks at the behaviour of the British abroad. The cover is by the PCO’s Robert Duncan. The magazine is available to subscribers for the annual price of £20 for six full colour issues.

If you’re interested in taking out a subscription, please drop us a line at foghorn@procartoonists.org.

–>

What’s inside?

Roger Penwill on on a travel adventure worthy of Samuel Beckett.
Rupert Besley on the holidays of his youth, when anything foreign was the subject of deep mistrust.
Clive Goddard on America, and how it is really rather big.
Clive Collins on the freelancer’s fear of taking time off.
And you’ll find a full page of cartoons by Andrew Birch.

Plus lots more: the Critic, the Foghorn Guide, the Potting Shed … and several straining suitcases packed with funny cartoons about what we did on our holidays. [this is a test]

Bloghorn is on its way!

July 19, 2011 in News

You’ll see the new PCO artist portfolio website is now up and running, and we will be merging the PCO’s blog – Bloghorn – here soon!

In the meantime, keep up with all the news from the world of cartooning at the original Bloghorn

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by Royston

Obscene postcards? You be the judge

July 18, 2011 in Events

Saucy postcard by Bob Wilkin
An exhibition of seaside postcards that were banned by local councils in the 1950s opens in Margate this week.

I Wish I Could See My Little Willy named after a postcard by Bob Wilkin, above, enraged the authorities in the prudish post war years. The show is being held at the Pie Factory gallery, opposite Margate’s old magistrate’s court where the publishers of the day would have been prosecuted.

Across the country the authorities confiscated and destroyed thousands of ‘‘saucy’’ postcards as they feared that that the nation’s morals were in decline after the Second World War.

The free exhibition, which opens on July 23 and runs until August 2, is held in conjunction with the British Cartoon Archive, which has been digitising the postcards and putting them online, along with their associated obscene publications index cards, as seen above.

Nick Hiley of the British Cartoon Archive, which is based at the University of Kent in nearby Canterbury, told Bloghorn:

‘‘We are organising the exhibition with the Dreamland Trust in Margate. I will be giving a talk in the magistrates’ court where the cards were condemned — they have a wonderful witness box on casters that I hope to lecture from.’’

The old court is now the Margate Musuem. The talk is at 2pm on July 30. The organisers are hoping to follow it with an airing of the Radio 4 play Getting The Joke by Neil Brand (BBC permission pending). It tells the story of the trial of Donald McGill, acknowledged master of the saucy postcard, in 1953.

Round up : What the Bloghorn saw

July 16, 2011 in Comment, News

Rob Murray writes:

More details are emerging about The Phoenix, a new weekly comic from the former editor of the short-lived DFC that is due to launch in January. The Phoenix blog features an animated trailer for one of its strips, The Pirates of Pangaea by Daniel Hartwell and Neill Cameron, while its latest email newsletter provides this interactive teaser for a strip by Dandy cartoonist Jamie Smart.

Saudi Arabia’s lone female newspaper cartoonist, Hana Hajjar, tells CNN about the importance of her role in a male-led society and how her cartoons speak out for women. You can read the interview here (thanks to fellow cartoonist Lou McKeever for spotting the story).

In Malaysia, cartoonist Zunar has been unsuccessful in his attempt to lift a ban on two of his cartoon collections, according to news agency Bernama. Zunar was arrested in September under the country’s Sedition Act for publishing books considered ‘detrimental to public order’. An open letter from Chuah Siew Eng of Malaysia’s Centre for Independent Journalism calls the latest decision disappointing. Zunar intends to appeal.

Timed to coincide with the release of the final Harry Potter film, cartoonist Lucy Knisley has launched a humorous comic that condenses the entire series. Time Out Chicago has the full story, and Knisley’s blog features an incredibly detailed poster to download (but beware of spoilers!).

If there is something Bloghorn really shouldn’t really have missed please add it in the comments below. Thank you.

 

Video at Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival

July 15, 2011 in Events, News

Martin Rowson splashing paint around at Shrewbury.

Have pen, will travel

July 14, 2011 in Comment, News

Mac of the Daily Mail © Stanley McMurtry of the Daily Mail

© Stanley McMurtry of the Daily Mail

Mac of the Daily Mail writes about a low technology joy of cartooning on the road in this travel piece for his employer. It is a nice read and shows, at least to Bloghorn, that many cartoonists are equally comfortable when combining picture and word to make memorable communication.

Seen any other examples of cartoonists who can write? Let the Bloghorn team know…