You are browsing the archive for 2012 November.

Leveson and the cartoonists

November 30, 2012 in Comment, General, News

Cartooning has long been associated with the print industry* so it is only natural that the artists have been interested in the Leveson Inquiry report into the Culture, Media and Ethics of the Press. It was delivered yesterday, as Dave Brown of The Independent notes.

© Dave Brown - Independent Leveson cartoon @procartoonists

© Dave Brown. The Independent @ Procartoonists.org

Bob Moran in The Daily Telegraph imagines Lord Justice Leveson receiving his morning paper.

© Bob Moran  - Telegraph @ procartoonists.org

© Bob Moran. The Daily Telegraph @ Procartoonists.org

Mr Murdoch is a recurring motif in this drawing made by Steve Bell in The Guardian.

© Steve-Bell - Guardian @ procartoonists.jpg

© Steve Bell. The Guardian @ Procartoonists.org

Peter Brookes in The Times takes a tangential look at the weaknesses in the job Lord Justice Leveson was asked to do by the Prime Minister, or, in political speak the missing bits of the terms of reference.

© Peter Brookes - Times @ procartoonists.org

© Peter Brookes. The Times @ Procartoonists.org

And why was he asked to make this report? It was something about the power of black and white, thinks Matthew Buck in Tribune.

© Matthew_Buck_Tribune_@_procartoonists.org

© Matthew Buck. Tribune @ Procartoonists.org

The coalition Government is already falling out about what the report has recommended, as captured by Andy Davey in The Sun.

©_Andy_Davey_The_Sun_@_procartoonists

© Andy Davey. The Sun @ Procartoonists.org

Clearly, it is time for a drink, courtesy of Jonathan Pugh.

© Pugh - Daily Mail @ procartoonists.org

© Pugh. Daily Mail @ Procartoonists.org

Mike Turner makes a (long term) prediction.

© Mike Turner on Leveson inquiry @ procartoonists.org

© Mike Turner @ Procartoonists.org

The rows resulting from the Leveson report are unlikely to be over by this Christmas, or next.

© Royston_Readers'_Digest @ procartoonists.org

© Royston Robertson. Reader's Digest 2011 @ Procartoonists.org

If you see anymore work we should note here please let us know in the comments below.

* It’s about more than just paper nowadays.

Profile photo of Royston

by Royston

Cartoonist wins book award

November 27, 2012 in General, News

Fintan Fedora by Clive Goddard

Fintan Fedora © Clive Goddard @Procartoonists.org

We send our hearty congratulations to Procartoonists.org member Clive Goddard who has won a schools book award for his children’s story Fintan Fedora, the World’s Worst Explorer.

He scooped the award for best book in the Key Stage 2 category in the Stockport Schools’ Book Award. The award, which has been running since 1995, sees pupils from around 65 schools, from nursery through to secondary, read, discuss and vote on a shortlist of books.

Fintan is an adventure story written by Clive though not, in fact, illustrated by him (the above image by Clive is from a slideshow he uses when out and about promoting the book). Clive told us:

“I’m utterly and throughly chuffed about the award, mainly because Fintan is my first attempt at fiction, and was only written in the first place due a lack of illustration work.

“The event evening was a little overwhelming. Hundreds of people, all dressed up in their posh clothes in a beautiful big theatre. Animated video nomination packages, golden envelopes, acceptance speeches and everything. Just like the Oscars but with Stockport accents, which made it even better.”

Canvassing for charity

November 27, 2012 in Events, General, News

Cartoon canvas by Robert Thompson

Cartoon canvas © Robert Thompson @ Procartoonists.org

Many cartoonists have contributed small canvases to the Stars on Canvas 2012 charity auction, which runs online until 2 December.

They include Procartoonists.org members Jonathan Cusick, Noel Ford, Tony Husband, Royston Robertson, Robert Thompson, above, and Kate Taylor. There are also canvases by names from the worlds of sport, music and entertainment.

The auction is in aid of the Willow Foundation, which arranges special days and experiences for seriously ill 16 to 40-year-olds. More details here.

Owzat! Instant cartoon

November 26, 2012 in Events, General, News

Telegraph_Cricket_Reportage_@_procartoonists.org

Telegraph cricket reportage @ Procartoonists.org

The hacks at the Daily Telegraph sports department have been taking on the art of the cartoon after a row over image rights deprived them of photography from the current test match series between England and India.

In a splendid example of making a spectacle when delivered of a googly, the journalists drew the action as it happened using some of the many digital drawing tools that now exist. We’ve linked to a few examples from the first and second tests.

Of course, the artwork is hurried and everyone thinks they are a comedian, but we say helmets off for effort. But, you know where to come when you need the professionals.

Cricket metaphor as applied by © Phil Disley @ procartoonists.org

More fully developed cricket metaphor © Phil Disley @ procartoonists.org

Our professional cartoonist membership portfolios.

The Round-up

November 24, 2012 in General, Links, News

© Dave Walker @Procartoonists.org

Dave Walker, regular contributor to Church Times and a member of Procartoonists.org, produced the cartoon above for The Guardian this week, following the Church of England’s decision to reject the ordination of women bishops. Dave’s cartoon has attracted more than 100 comments, and counting.

Having moved into greeting card designs, Matthew Inman – the cartoonist behind US website The Oatmeal – is being sued for trademark infringement. Inman was involved in another legal rights battle earlier in the year, against online content aggregator FunnyJunk. In that instance, FunnyJunk had been using Oatmeal material without permission – but bizarrely issued a lawsuit against Inman. Refresh your memory by reading our coverage of the case.

Darren Davis, the man behind independent comics publisher Bluewater Productions, is embracing a move into digital publishing, but is finding another side of the internet – online criticism – hard to take.

The New Yorker has published its third annual ‘bookazine’ cartoon compilation. The New Yorker Cartoons of the Year 2012 features more than 250 of the best gags that have run in the magazine this year, along with new material. No word yet on whether it will be distributed outside the US, but previous editions have made their way to the UK courtesy of discerning stockists including the London Review Bookshop.

Profile photo of Royston

by Royston

Comics in running for book prize

November 21, 2012 in General, News

Ripples were sent through the world of book publishing last night when it was announced that the shortlist for the Costa Book Prize features not one, but two graphic novels.

Days of the Bagnold Summer

Days of the Bagnold Summer © Joff Winterhart

Joff Winterhart’s Days of the Bagnold Summer, above, will compete against Hilary Mantel’s Bring Up The Bodies, the winner of this year’s Man Booker Prize, in the novel category. Mary and Bryan Talbot are nominated in the biography category for Dotter of her Father’s Eyes.

Day’s of the Bagnold Summer (review here) is the story of a difficult mother-son relationship. Winterhart is a former runner-up in the Observer-Jonathan Cape Graphic Short Story Prize

Dotter of her Father's Eyes

Dotter of her Father's Eyes © Mary and Bryan Talbot

Dotter Of Her Father’s Eyes (review), above, written by Mary M. Talbot and illustrated by her husband, the acclaimed comics artist Bryan Talbot, is part memoir of the author’s own life and part biography of James Joyce’s troubled daughter.

The Costas recognise the most enjoyable books in five categories – novel, first novel, biography, poetry and children’s book – by writers in the UK and Ireland. An overall winner, across all categories, is also announced.

Winners in the five categories, who each receive £5,000, will be announced on 2 January. The overall winner will receive £30,000 and will be announced at an awards ceremony in London on 29 January. See the full shortlist at the Costa Book Awards website.

Whither the art

November 20, 2012 in Comment, General

Whither the art - at school. Considered by UK @ procartoonists.org

© Bill Stott @ Procartoonists.org

Our wise old cartoonist Bill Stott contemplates the state of the, er, art.

Interesting discussion on the Radio 4 Andrew Marr slot (19 November 2012) all about arts, arts funding, art in schools, and the new National Curriculum, which doesn’t include art and design as a compulsory subject.

The artist Antony Gormley and others sang the praises, quite rightly, of all the craftspersons and technical experts who make artists’ work possible, but the bit which stuck with me was that fact above about the National Curriculum.

I know a bit about art education in secondary schools, having been a teacher in the past. Its standards and performance nationally are much like that of maths or biology. i.e. good, bad and indifferent.

However, it always struck me that decisions about what subjects should be taught were never the remit of art teachers. It was fine for a head teacher, or a head of curriculum as they became known (usually a deputy head) whose specialist subject was English or physics, to decide how many periods of maths, geography, history, science, languages, PE, RE and art etc, should be taught.

It was always taken as read that maths and English were the most important and I’ve no argument with that. What does make me wonder is the grasp, or lack of it, that these decision-makers have of good art teaching. My experience is: not a lot. When I was teaching art, there was still a deeply irritating belief, from those who didn’t teach it, that being good at and enjoying art was a “gift”– the stamping ground of the very few. Which is nonsense. Just as having a “gift” for geography is nonsense.

Bill Stott cartoon

© Bill Stott @ Procartoonists.org

OK, some kids are naturally able. But some kids are naturally able at PE, that doesn’t mean that all kids don’t get the opportunity.

So, given the new non-compulsory nature of art in schools, and the fact that curriculum decision-makers in schools were rubbish at art when they were at school, I fear that art may soon be relegated to after-school clubs. A pastime. How sad.

If you have something to say about BIll’s opinion please jump into the comments below.

The Round-up

November 17, 2012 in General, Links, News

Self-portrait © Quentin Blake @Procartoonists.org

BBC Radio 4’s arts programme Front Row spoke to Quentin Blake ahead of the publication of his second volume of illustrated memoirs this week. Listen to the interview here.

Alex Scarfe, the son of the renowned satirical cartoonist Gerald, is one of the three minds behind Full English, the new animated sitcom currently running on Channel 4. The Guardian ran this interview ahead of the show’s debut.

A selection of redesigned film posters by illustrator Olly Moss are being exhibited at the White Cloth Gallery in Leeds. You can see a selection on the BBC website, and The Yorkshire Post interviews Moss here.

Following last year’s 50th birthday celebrations at Private Eye, a selection of cartoons from the exhibition have made their way north of the border to Scotland. Read about the gallery show at Kirremuir with the Courier.co.uk.

Finally, Procartoonists.org member Adrian Teal has launched The Gin Lane Gazette, which has been published by Unbound and is crowd-funded. Adrian describes the book as “a compendium of true stories, scandal and oddities from the 18th century; a kind of Georgian Heat magazine, if you like.” See more, and buy the book, here.

Profile photo of Royston

by Royston

Cartoonists and illustrators on show

November 13, 2012 in Events, General, News

David Hockney by Jonathan Cusick

David Hockney by Jonathan Cusick (detail) @ Procartoonists.org

The cartoonists Peter Brookes, Matt Pritchett and Procartoonists.org member Jonathan Cusick, above, feature in The Illustrators, the annual winter show held at the Chris Beetles Gallery in St James’s, London.

Featuring 800 works from across three centuries, this year’s exhibition marks the bicentenaries of the births of both Charles Dickens and Edward Lear, with drawings and watercolours by close friends and collaborators. Later illustrations to a number of Dickens editions also feature.

The selling exhibition opens this Saturday (17 November) and runs until 5 January. For details on opening times visit chrisbeetles.com You can view a PDF of the show’s catalogue online here.

The Round-up

November 9, 2012 in General, Links, News

 

© Bruce Eric Kaplan/The New Yorker @Procartoonists.org

Bruce Eric Kaplan, the cartoonist and TV writer who signs his distinctive New Yorker cartoons as BEK (above), tells Co.Create about how day-to-day frustrations lead to many of his best ideas. Read the interview and see a selection of BEK’s work here. (Thanks to cartoonist Mike Lynch for the link.)

British comics artist Lew Stringer alerts us to some tweaks that have been made to The Beano this week – including a new run (geddit?) for Billy Whizz by Procartoonists.org member Wilbur Dawbarn. Wilbur had previously offered a teaser on his own blog.

Political cartoonist David Trumble looks back over several cartoons he devised to comment on the various possible outcomes of the Obama/McCain US presidential election four years ago, and offers his take on this week’s Obama/Romney vote. See them all here.

Also to coincide with polling day in the States, The New Yorker offers a selection of its election cartoons.

And finally, a striking and appropriate design has been chosen for the planned Comics and Animation Museum in Hangzhou, China. Take a look.