You are browsing the archive for 2013 July.

Profile photo of Royston

by Royston

Seaside show for cartoonist

July 29, 2013 in Events, News

Artwork © Cathy Simpson

Artwork © Cathy Simpson @ Procartoonists.org

Fishing for Buoys, an exhibition by the Procartoonists.org member Cathy Simpson opens in St Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex, on 5 August. The exhibition is at the Gill gallery, 55 King’s Road, until 24 August.

The gallery is open Monday-Friday 10am-4pm, except Wednesday 10am-1pm. A “meet the artist” private view will be held on Saturday 10 August, 10am-1pm.

The Round-up

July 26, 2013 in Events, General, Links, News

© Kipper Williams @Procartoonists.org

Kipper Williamspocket cartoonist for The Guardian, member of Procartoonists.org, and the man behind the excellent cartoon above – has provided the illustrations for a new book of anecdotes from record shops. Read more here.

Ian Hislop and Richard Ingrams – editors of Private Eye and The Oldie respectively – will be joined by Nick Newman, long-time contributor to both magazines, for a panel session at the Soho Literary Festival on 26 September. The Cartoon Show will feature a slideshow of some of the best gags from the last 50 years, and the trio will talk about what they look for when selecting cartoons for publication. Tickets are available here.

Burmese cartoonist Kyaw Thu Yein tells Cartoon Movement about the way he works, as well as the impact of censorship, in this interview.

As The Beano celebrates its 75th birthday this week, cartoonist Nigel Parkinson talks about the success of Dennis The Menace while drawing a new strip in this short film for The Telegraph.

London’s Southbank Centre is currently host to Beanotown, a celebration of the comic that runs until 8 September and features a range of original artwork on the walls, as well as activities for the kids. Wilbur Dawbarn, a Beano cartoonist and PCO member, produced this huge map of Beanotown, which greets visitors by the entrance:

Wilbur Dawbarn for The Beano @Procartoonists.com

And finally, a brief reminder that next Saturday (3 August) will see a plethora of UK cartooning talent descend on Herne Bay in Kent, to take part in a festival celebrating the seaside town’s connection with Marcel Duchamp. Read more here, and visit us in the coming week for a more detailed post.

The seaside surrealist

July 16, 2013 in Events, General, News

 

Procartoonists_Cartoon_Surrealism_at_Herne_Bay @procartoonists.org

Photograph © Kasia Kowalska taken at Cartoon Museum for @Procartoonists.org

It is barely two weeks before we take a charabanc ride to the coast for the first Duchamp in Herne Bay.

Catch a glimpse of the exhibiting and attending cartoonists here – they include Ralph Steadman whose retrospective show can be seen at the Cartoon Museum (@cartoonmuseumuk) during the summer and whose self-portrait features above.

You can read an online programme for the whole festival here. Sprinkled throughout it you will find some fantastic art-based cartoons from our members.

The date for the diary is Saturday 3 August. We say don’t miss it!

Duchampions_Poster_at_Herne_Bay_at_Procartoonists.org © Hunt Emerson

© Hunt Emerson @ Procartoonists.org

The Round-up

July 15, 2013 in General, Links, News

Chris Burke in his studio © Anke @Procartoonists.org

Chris Burke, the widely published caricaturist and illustrator – and Procartoonists.org member – gives a local blog a tour of his home and studio in Royal Tunbridge Wells. Read the resulting feature interview, and see plenty of examples of Chris’ work,  here.

The Guardian has an interview with David Fickling and family – the tribe behind weekly comic The Phoenix – told in comic-strip format.

Charlie Paul, director of the Ralph Steadman documentary For No Good Reason, shares a short time-lapse film showing the Procartoonists.org member in action. (Brought to our attention by the Cartoon Museum – follow them on Twitter: @cartoonmuseumuk.)

Following a long-awaited British – or is that Scottish? – victory in the men’s singles event at Wimbledon, Andy Murray has been popping up in many a cartoon. He appears alongside his mother, Judy, in the 75th anniversary issue of The Beano; has been knighted courtesy of Procartoonist Andy Davey in The Sun; and was cynically adopted by the politicians, in cartoons by Christian Adams for The Telegraph and Peter Brookes for The Times.

The Round-up

July 8, 2013 in General, Links, News

Above: Cartoon editor Bob Mankoff on the anatomy of a New Yorker cartoon. Over at New Yorker HQ, Mankoff’s blog features a guest column about using cartoon captions in the classroom.

Several months after taking The Dandy purely digital, DC Thomson has suspended its existing app, saying that “the technology and format have let us down”. But the company has stressed that this is not the end of Britain’s longest-running comic.

A spokesperson said: “Discussions and planning are already under way to re-examine The Dandy’s digital offering. It is still too early to announce what form this next stage will take but we would like to reassure readers that The Dandy remains a very important part of the company’s plans for the future.”

We at Procartoonists.org will revisit the story when there is more to tell.

Meanwhile, the Dandy contributor Jamie Smart has taken the opportunity to voice his opinions about what could be done to strengthen the British comics industry.

In a timely slideshow, Howard Tayler, a webcomic creator, looks at how cartoonists can succeed in the digital world.

Jonathan Pugh, the regular pocket cartoonist for the Daily Mail and procartoonists member, has a new range of greetings cards available online. Click here to peruse them.

And finally, how much do you know about the humble pencil?

Duchamp in Herne Bay

July 4, 2013 in Events, General, News

 

Duchampions_Poster_at_Herne_Bay_at_Procartoonists.org © Hunt Emerson

© Hunt Emerson @ procartoonists.org

We are pleased to be able to share more details of the Duchampions cartoon event with the help of the fantastic event poster made by Hunt Emerson.

It gives a great idea of some of the events we have highlighted that will be taking place in Herne Bay, Kent, on Saturday 3 August

Cartoonists attending or submitting artwork for the Duchamp and Modern Art “Cartoons in Pubs” are:

Andrew Birch, Andy Davey, Bill Stott, Cathy Simpson, Chris Burke, Chris Madden, Hunt Emerson, Ian Baker, Steve Jones, Martin Honeysett, Mike Turner, Noel Ford, Pete Dredge, Royston Robertson, Rupert Besley, The Surreal McCoy, Steve Bell, Tim HarriesAlex Matthews, Colin Whittock, Dave Brown, Gary Northfield, Grizelda Grizlingham, Jeremy Banks, Jonathan Cusick, Kipper Williams, Matt Buck, Matt Pritchett, Nathan Ariss, Richard “RGJ” Jolley, Rob Murray, Roger Penwill, Simon Pearsall, Steve Way, Tim Sanders, Tony Husband, and Wilbur Dawbarn.

We will be publishing further details ahead of the event.

We say gags, they say single-panel

July 2, 2013 in Comment, General

Pete Dredge offers a British perspective in reaction to an American cartoonist’s views on the cartooning game

“Single-panel” or “gag” cartoonist? The former is the default description from over the pond and is infinitely preferable to the UK’s more downmarket “gag” label for those of us who create the stand-alone joke.

Cartoon by Pete Dredge

Single-panel or gag? Cartoon © Pete Dredge

Apart from that, there appears to be little difference in attitudes to gag cartoonists on either side of the Atlantic, if the video talks by the New Yorker cartoonist Matthew Diffee – as recently featured on this blog – are anything to go by. (Well, apart from the fact that most US cartoonists seem to be equally as eloquent with a microphone as they are with a pen, something that the reserved UK cartoonist can find difficult to master.)

It was comforting to know that our US counterparts are bombarded with the same probing questioning from inquisitive admirers. “Where do you get your ideas?” appears to top both the UK and US list. Diffee perceptively regards this as “a good question, it is the only question because without an idea there is no cartoon”. He then offers up the disarmingly honest answer “We think of ’em!”

Brilliant!

Why haven’t we ever thought of that? UK gagsmiths start to ramble on about lateral thinking, brainstorming and word association whilst our inquisitor’s eyes start to glaze over.

“I wish I could do that” and “I could never do that” are supplementary statements thrown up by the misguided onlooker. Diffee believes that these admissions underline the misconception that cartoonists draw “for fun”, something that can be churned out at the drop of a hat. “How long have you tried?” he asks. He points out that it takes several hours and a pot of coffee to come up with ideas.

Then there’s the ability to handle rejection. Diffee likens the inevitable low hit rate – at The New Yorker one in ten is “top of the game”, more often it’s something like one in 30 – to the a mother sea turtle laying thousands of eggs. After being subjected to the ravages of crabs, birds and fish, if one baby makes it through then it’s job done.

Another characteristic shared by both US and UK cartoonists is the requirement to develop stoicism when confronted by other media types. One video featured Diffee being interviewed after his talk by a hack from Forbes magazine.

Trying hard to describe the idea-creating process, he says: “It’s about concepts, like comedy writing, it’s about language, not drawing, at this stage.” The journalist seemed to struggle with this abstract notion.

But Diffee soon has the measure of his inquisitor and describes how he is trying to keep up with the latest hi-tech devices. “Have you seen them? They’re amazing. You click on the end and it comes out here,” he says, describing a propelling pencil to his bemused interrogator.

Many thanks, Pete. Do you have any views on cartooning US and UK style? Let us know in the comments below.