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The Round-up

March 23, 2014 in Events, General, Links, News

Clive Goddard draws for Sport Relief at the BBC

Clive Goddard draws for Sport Relief at the BBC

Kasia Kowalska writes:

Procartoonists.org member Clive Goddard played his part in the most successful Sport Relief to date when he showed his support for BBC Radio 2 host Jo Whiley during her 26-hour treadmill challenge. He posted more pictures here.

More PCO members are out and about: Ahead of a talk at Hornchurch Library next week, Adrian Teal spoke to a local paper about his book The Gin Lane Gazette and political satire. And next month Martin Rowson is hosting a workshop for The Laurence Sterne Trust.

In anticipation of Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in the UK at the British Library, the artist behind Tank Girl and the band Gorillaz, Jamie Hewlett, has unveiled new artwork for the exhibition poster.

Following the parody-heavy backlash after the recent post on tax cuts by Grant Shapps on Twitter, Pam Cowburn of Open Rights Group bemoans the fact that UK copyright law is no laughing matter when it comes to parody. The planned reforms appear to have been kicked into the long grass due to parliamentary delays.

Bob Mankoff has written a memoir

Bob Mankoff has written a memoir that doubles as a guide for aspiring cartoonists

The memoirs of The New Yorker cartoon editor Bob Mankoff, went on on sale yesterday in the US (readers in the UK will have to wait until 14 April). How About Never — Is Never Good for You? My Life In Cartoons will become a guide for aspiring cartoonists, according to Janet Maslin of The New York Times.

To coincide with the release of the book, CBS’s 60 Minutes produced a report on Mankoff and the art of choosing cartoons.

The Washington Post caused a furore by publishing a cartoon by Zunar criticising the Malaysian government’s response to the disappearance of the Malaysian Airlines flight MH370. The Malaysian editorial cartoonist was previously charged for sedition in 2010 for publishing his book of cartoons Cartoon-O-Phobia.

Not every cartoonist has an asteroid named in their honour. 4942 Munroe bears the name of xkcd creator Randall Munroe whose book What If? is due to be published later this year.

The Seattle cartoonist Tatiana Gill has created a collection of comic art to celebrate Women’s History Month. What is that? you may ask. This cartoon by Rob Rogers of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette may help (or not!)

Finally, Procartoonists.org members never make mistakes, of course, but just in case, the BBC reports on a pen that spots errors.

The Round Up

January 28, 2014 in Events, General, Links, News

Kasia Kowalska writes:

Fancy a spot of 18th century roistering? The caricaturist Adrian Teal can invite you to club nights with a difference with his Historic Punch.

© HistoricPunch.co.uk @ procartoonists.org

© HistoricPunch.co.uk @ Procartoonists.org

He has also revealed the story behind the Georgian John Bull, in History Today. John Bull was actually invented by a Scot but he proved a much loved subject of James Gillray and Thomas Rowlandson, whose exhibition High Spirits you can still see at The Queen’s Gallery in Edinburgh.

Other cartoon masters have been listed by Richard Grigoris. At number 12 is Herbert Lawrence Block, better known as Herblock, whose US career spanned more than 70 years. A new documentary celebrating his career has just been broadcast on HBO. We expect it will turn up on the internet soon too.

Herblock_The_Black_and_the_White_@_procartoonists.org

Herblock: The Black and the White @ Procartoonists.org

As we noted yesterday, the Jesus and Mo cartoon continues to cause uproar. The Hampstead and Kilburn Lib Dem candidate Maajid Nawaz has received death threats and calls for deselection after publishing the cartoon on Twitter. The cartoonists were quick to respond.

© Hero-Glyphics by Josh Low @ procartoonists.org

Hero-Glyphics © Josh Low @ Procartoonists.org

Cartoonists are regularly attacked in the UK and across the globe and here are a few recent examples. Peter Schrank had his cartoon removed from the Economist website following complaints by the Anti-Defamation League. The Ecuadorian cartoonist Bonil, received a court summons after publication of a cartoon criticising the country’s president. And, the Palestinian cartoonist Majedah Shaheen apologised on Twitter having somehow upset Hamas.

More happily, there are still plenty of places where cartoonists are welcome: the 16th PortoCartoon World Festival in Portugal, the 46th Umoristi A Marostica in Italy, the 31st Aydın Doğan International Cartoon Competition in Turkey and the very 1st Cairo International Cartoon Exhibition in Egypt.

And finally, Egypt was also on Josh Lane’s mind, when he recreated modern heroes in his Hero-Glyphics, above.

The Round-up

October 21, 2013 in Events, General, Links, News

© George Grosz @Procartoonists.org

George Grosz, the German satirical artist who has inspired so many of today’s cartoonists, is the subject of a new exhibition at the Richard Nagy gallery in London – the first retrospective of Grosz’s work to be held in the UK for almost 20 years. Read more about the show here.

Matt Pritchett of The Telegraph has been named Pocket Cartoonist of the Year for an impressive seventh time. Other winners at the Cartoon Art Trust‘s gala dinner on 17 October included Procartoonists.org member Kipper Williams (The Guardian), Peter Brookes (The Times), Peter Schrank (The Independent), and Mike Barfield (Private Eye). The Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to Nicholas Garland. Cartoonist Oliver Preston, who MC’d the ceremony and set up the Cartoon Art Trust Awards in 1995, has plenty more about the awards evening here. Congrats and kudos to all the winners.

Michael Maslin, a regular cartoonist for The New Yorker, asks his peers to reveal some of their most autobiographical gags and the inspiration behind them. Read the responses here.

We are sorry to note that James Sillavan (JAS) has died at the age of 63. His cartoons appeared in a wide variety of newspapers and magazines, notably The Guardian, The Observer, The Telegraph, The Financial Times, The Tablet and The Economist. The Guardian has a detailed obituary here.

An auction of original Giles cartoons has far exceeded estimates. Visit the BBC for more details and a short video.

And finally – looking for something special for the history buff in your life? PCOer Adrian Teal, himself something of an expert on the 18th Century, is one of the brains behind this ‘replica cundum’, which is being auctioned on behalf of Cancer Research UK. Go on – you know you want to.

The Round-up

April 28, 2013 in Events, General, Links, News

North Stand © Huw Aaron @Procartoonists.org

Kudos to Procartoonists.org member Huw Aaron, who was recently highly commended in the Cartoonist of the Year category of the 2013 Sports Journalism Awards for his rugby-themed strip, North Stand (the prize was eventually won by The Telegraph’s Matt Pritchett for his coverage of the London Olympics). Huw has also been busy with other projects, including producing stop-motion animations for S4C science programme Corff Cymru.

Following the recent publication of his Gin Lane Gazette, PCO member Adrian Teal has been leading guided tours of London.

Harry Venning, the cartoonist and comedy writer behind Clare in the Community, is opening up his Brighton studio for four weekends during May as part of the Brighton Festival. See the brochure to find out more about the Artists Open Houses event. Harry’s studio is at 93 Islingword Road.

Amazon has launched a new tool enabling cartoonists and comic creators to produce digital versions of their work for Kindle. Read more here.

Graphic journalist Dan Archer tells the BBC about how he uses comic strips to report on major political and social issues. Elsewhere, New Yorker cartoonist Liza Donnelly writes for Forbes about the importance of cartoons by women around the world.

Cartoonists and illustrators including Simon Tofield, Sir Quentin Blake and Peter Brookes are among the artists taking part in Gromit Unleashed, painting statues of the beloved Aardman dog for charity.

And finally, any cartoonist will appreciate the humour in this series of letters about rejection from Mad magazine.

If you come across a piece of cartooning news we might not have spotted, please let us know.

 

The Round-up

April 7, 2013 in General, Links, News

Above: The Gin Lane Gazette, produced by Procartoonists.org member Adrian Teal, has now hit the shops. The book receives an enthusiastic academic review here, showing that it’s not only a lot of fun, but also bang on target. Elsewhere, Ade explains how he went about crowd-funding the project.

Mike Barfield, the man behind Apparently in Private Eye, has also been working on a new book. Swat! A Fly’s Guide to Staying Alive is published on 16 April. In the meantime, you can read an interview with Mike here.

Cartoonist Simon Chadwick will be abseiling down the Spinnaker Tower in Portsmouth on 27 May to raise money for the Myositis Support Group. Simon has previously written and illustrated a children’s book, Teddy-Bo’s Feeling Tired, a copy of which is given to every child diagnosed with the condition. To sponsor Simon and support his abseil attempt, click here.

Rachel Cooke of The Observer describes a favourite cartoon by Tom Gauld, in a comment piece about the need to separate art from artist.

And finally, the comics artist Lew Stringer has launched a new blog. It focuses solely on his own work, old and new – unlike his previous venture, Blimey!, which became a Herculean task as he looked at the entire history of British comics. We say fair play to Lew (and, after all, Blimey! can still be seen here) and it’s always nice to see works in progress. Check it out.


The Round-up

November 17, 2012 in General, Links, News

Self-portrait © Quentin Blake @Procartoonists.org

BBC Radio 4′s arts programme Front Row spoke to Quentin Blake ahead of the publication of his second volume of illustrated memoirs this week. Listen to the interview here.

Alex Scarfe, the son of the renowned satirical cartoonist Gerald, is one of the three minds behind Full English, the new animated sitcom currently running on Channel 4. The Guardian ran this interview ahead of the show’s debut.

A selection of redesigned film posters by illustrator Olly Moss are being exhibited at the White Cloth Gallery in Leeds. You can see a selection on the BBC website, and The Yorkshire Post interviews Moss here.

Following last year’s 50th birthday celebrations at Private Eye, a selection of cartoons from the exhibition have made their way north of the border to Scotland. Read about the gallery show at Kirremuir with the Courier.co.uk.

Finally, Procartoonists.org member Adrian Teal has launched The Gin Lane Gazette, which has been published by Unbound and is crowd-funded. Adrian describes the book as “a compendium of true stories, scandal and oddities from the 18th century; a kind of Georgian Heat magazine, if you like.” See more, and buy the book, here.

After Gin Lane: Giving it all away

September 6, 2012 in Comment, General

Following From Gin Lane to the Information Superhighway we see that there are cartoonists who are positively embracing this new era of social media and sharing.

Hairy Steve © Steve Bright @ Procartoonists.org

Webcomics and viral cartoons are a couple of the ways that you can effectively give your work away to the web but get paid back by other means. Successful webcomics work on a business model based on the idea that you give away a regularly updated cartoon on your website and build a following of readers who come back day after day. British examples include John Allison‘s Bad Machinery or Jamie Smart‘s Corporate Skull.

© Peter Steiner @ Procartoonists.org

The profit comes from selling merchandise to the more loyal fans – bound compilations, prints, sketches, T-shirts, toys and so forth. Similarly, viral cartoons can drive lots of new readers to your website. How much money can be directly attributed to virals is arguable, although, for example, the well-known New Yorker cartoon “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog” is said to have earned its creator, Peter Steiner, more than $50,000.

The website Kickstarter has recently become one of the biggest publishers of comic books in the USA, from independent cartoonists using the crowd-funding model to raise money directly from their fan-base. Here in the UK, Procartoonists.org‘s very own Adrian Teal (The Gin Lane Gazette) and Steve Bright (Hairy Steve – in collaboration with Jamie Smart) have developed their own crowd-funded projects.

We’ll be considering another aspect of the communication change – After Gin Laneand what it means for cartoonists next week

The Round-up

May 6, 2012 in General

If you are a fan of funding crowd-sourced books we commend the following projects from two Procartoonists.org members: Stevyn Colgan‘s Connectoscope and the caricaturist Adrian Teal, who is still raising funds for his Gin Lane Gazette. You can contribute to funding these projects at the Unbound site.

Terry Mosher, a Canadian political cartoonist best known by his pen name of Aislin, has been inducted into the country’s Cartoonist Hall of Fame this weekend. In an interview with the Daily Brew blog, he discusses his work and explains that conservatives are easier to satirise than liberals because “the fatter the cat, the more fun you have”. Read the Q&A here.

Daniel Clowes, the creator of Ghost World and Eightball, is the subject of a new gallery exhibition in his hometown of Oakland, California. If you can’t make it over there, read this instead.

With Garfield making the move into full-length comic books, the cartoon cat’s creator, Jim Davis, speaks to Comic Book Resources about adapting his character to different formats – and about what the decline of newspapers and rise of the internet can mean for up-and-coming cartoonists. Read more here.

Gin and opinions

December 14, 2011 in Comment

Gin Lane Gazette

Cartoonists have long adopted the technique of writing about the future or the past as a good way of talking about the present day.

But PCO member Adrian Teal is adapting this artifice with a crowd-funded project on the history of 18th century Britain, which he explains in a short video pitch. 

Adrian is working with the Unbound book site which provides a platform for authors to pitch their products to would-be book buyers for self-funding.

His Gin Lane Gazette – an 18th century version of Heat magazine – follows a similar path to The Opinions of Tobias Grubbe, the news cartoon that appears weekly in the digital Telegraph.

Tobias Grubbe animated cartoon © Michael Cross and Matthew Buck hack Cartoons

Quite Interesting Cartoonists

August 25, 2010 in News

PCO member Stevyn Colgan writes:

This year, members of the PCO have once again contributed to the BBC TV series QI and its spin-off book titles. It’s a relationship that has existed ever since the first QI Annual was published in 2008.

The TV show – in which each season follows a letter of the alphabet – was already in its fifth ‘E’ season when it was decided that some sort of annual was in order. True to form, QI inventor John Lloyd (also the man who created The News Quiz, The News Huddlines, Not the Nine O’Clock News, Spitting Image, produced all four series of Blackadder, and co-wrote two episodes of The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy with his friend Douglas Adams) sought out the funniest contributors he could find, roping in the likes of Rowan Atkinson, Bill Bailey, Jo Brand, Alan Davies and, of course, Stephen Fry. He also needed illustrations and lots of them. And that’s where the relationship with members of the PCO started.

The annuals have featured work by Jonathan Cusick (cover of the ‘G’ Annual), Adrian Teal (who also painted the cover of the ‘F’ annual), and Stevyn Colgan. This Christmas, the brand new ‘H’ Annual will feature more submissions from Adrian and Stevyn. Also, the first three E, F and G Annuals are being bundled into a softback compilation edition in November with a brand new cover by Stevyn. And, for the first time, artwork by Adrian and Stevyn will be seen on the TV show itself gracing the big screens behind the panellists in the episode on ‘Horses’ and ‘Humans’.

The EFG Bumper Book of QI Annuals and the QI ‘H’ Annual are both published by Faber and Faber on November 4th.