You are browsing the archive for BEK.

The Round-up

November 9, 2012 in General, Links, News

 

© Bruce Eric Kaplan/The New Yorker @Procartoonists.org

Bruce Eric Kaplan, the cartoonist and TV writer who signs his distinctive New Yorker cartoons as BEK (above), tells Co.Create about how day-to-day frustrations lead to many of his best ideas. Read the interview and see a selection of BEK’s work here. (Thanks to cartoonist Mike Lynch for the link.)

British comics artist Lew Stringer alerts us to some tweaks that have been made to The Beano this week – including a new run (geddit?) for Billy Whizz by Procartoonists.org member Wilbur Dawbarn. Wilbur had previously offered a teaser on his own blog.

Political cartoonist David Trumble looks back over several cartoons he devised to comment on the various possible outcomes of the Obama/McCain US presidential election four years ago, and offers his take on this week’s Obama/Romney vote. See them all here.

Also to coincide with polling day in the States, The New Yorker offers a selection of its election cartoons.

And finally, a striking and appropriate design has been chosen for the planned Comics and Animation Museum in Hangzhou, China. Take a look.

Round-up:What the Bloghorn saw

June 3, 2011 in News

Rob Murray writes:

The Telegraph‘s Hay Festival coverage includes an interview with the paper’s own longstanding pocket cartoonist, Matt Pritchett, in which he talks about how he got started, his typical work process and the challenges of producing a daily cartoon. You can read the entire piece here.

Elsewhere, New Yorker cartoonist Bruce Eric Kaplan (BEK) has shared an excerpt from his illustrated story about a man trying to come up with the perfect graduation speech. The picture book – like most BEK cartoons – combines concise, dark writing with sparse line drawings, and can be sampled on the Huffington Post blog.

Another New Yorker contributor, the self-effacing cartoonist and illustrator Ivan Brunetti, is profiled by the Chicago Tribune here.

Meanwhile, the Wall Street Journal reports on an embarassing situation for German newspaper Die Zeit that should serve as a reminder to all topical and political cartoonists – namely, keep track of who’s in charge.