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The Round-up

March 10, 2014 in Events, General, Links, News

© Jen Sorensen. Click to enlarge

© Jen Sorensen @ Procartoonists.org. Click to enlarge

Kasia Kowalska writes:

Jen Sorensen, cartoonist for the Austin Chronicle and other US papers, has become the first woman to win the coveted Herblock Prize for editorial cartooning.

The annual award was created to recognise editorial cartooning as an essential vehicle for freedom of speech and the right of expression. Meanwhile Emlly Carroll, creator of the horror comic Out of Skinwon the Cartoonist Studio Prize for the best web comic.

Chris Ware, the cartoonist behind Building Stories, talks about the devaluation of drawing in an age dominated by visual images in an interview with Chip Kidd at Salon.com. He says that the schools curriculum in  the US does not allow much time for drawing, a problem echoed in the UK that we have covered on this blog.

Talking of our visual culture, Getty Images has announced that everyone can now use their images online for free. But not everyone is impressed, as Brian Krogsgard explains.

Food cartoon © Berger & Wyse

© Berger & Wyse @ Procartoonists.org

The Guardian cartoonists Joe Berger and Pascal Wyse have an exhibition called Sense of Fun at Creation Fine Arts in Beverley, the East Yorkshire town where Wyse was born. The Hull Daily Mail has more. Meanwhile, Birmingham Museum has announced the opening in May of a must-see exhibition: Marvellous Machines: The Wonderful World of Rowland Emett.

Great news for comic strip aficionados, Bill Watterson, creator of Calvin and Hobbes, has published his first new work in 19 years: it’s this poster for a documentary on the future of comic strips.

On a more sombre note, cartoonists used International Women’s Day last weekend to draw attention to issues that affect women: Alexsandro Palombo focused on domestic violence, Touka Neyestani on the curtailment of women’s rights in Iran, and Damien Glez on violence against women in Africa. Also, an exhibition of cartoons portraying Korean sex slaves during the Second World War goes on display in Seoul.

In Málaga, the Centro de Arte Contemporáneo is celebrating the work of Andrés Rabago, the El País cartoonist known as El Roto. His work has been likened to Goya by the critic Matthew Clayfield.

Finally, the Procartoonists.org member Steve “Brighty” Bright, co-creator of Bananaman, was tickled by this stag night photo that made it to the BBC news site.

The Round-up

February 10, 2014 in Events, General, Links, News

Kasia Kowalska writes:

Dave Walker, a Procartoonists member, talks about what makes him tick in a short film by Michal Dzierza, above, called Being A Cartoonist.

If you like to know what makes other people tick, a new exhibition celebrating the life and work of Mel Calman has opened at the Freud Museum in Hampstead, London. Titled Calman meets Freud, it explores the much-loved cartoonist’s interest in psychiatry and mental health.

Andy Davey has put his recent lecture on the future of political cartooning, which we previewed here, on his website “in windbaggy blog form” (his words, not ours).

Though they may not always admit it, cartoonists are often inspired by other cartoonists. Michael Maslin wanted to know what cartoon collections inspired his colleagues at The New Yorker. He calls these collections “Cartoon Bibles”.

scott adams book

Passion – even for cartoons – is not everything: Scott Adams, the man behind Dilbert, ponders the virtues of failure in this video interview. He has succeeded in writing a book about failure, above.

Sometimes even the most creative ventures fail, as the DrawQuest founder Chris Poole found out.

Yet some cartoons are destined for success. It has been 25 years since The Simpsons broke the mould and made social satire a household name. To celebrate, Lego has teamed up with Fox to re-create them as its iconic figures. Keeping with the celebratory spirit, the cartoonist and animator David Silverman has published early Simpsons drawings on Twitter.

Bill Watterson made the news by winning the Grand Prix at 41st Angouleme Festival in France for his timeless strip Calvin and Hobbes. Also, the 30th Aydın Doğan International Cartoon Competition in Turkey announced its winners, with the top prize going to a Polish cartoonist, Krzysztof Grzondziel.

One cartoonist who may be certain that such recognition will not present itself in his own country is Bonil of Ecuador. Following a press watchdog’s ruling that he had insulted Rafael Correa, the president, the newspaper El Universo was forced to publish a suitable “correction” from the cartoonist.

The Round-up

December 12, 2013 in General, Links, News

© Peter Brookes @Procartoonists.org

The death of Nelson Mandela inspired poignant tributes from UK cartoonists, among them Peter Brookes in The Times (above), Peter Schrank in The Independent and Christian Adams in The Telegraph. Elsewhere, the South African cartoonist Zapiro tells the BBC a personal anecdote that demonstrates Mandela’s appreciation of satire.

Congratulations to Len Hawkins, who has been named the first-ever recipient of The Spectator’s Michael Heath Award for Cartooning. Already an established gag cartoonist, Len has won a year’s contract with the magazine, an original drawing by Heath, a bottle of gin, and a hand-made pair of shoes from John Lobb, which sponsored the competition.

Bill Watterson, creator of the much-loved Calvin and Hobbes comic strip, looks set to be the subject of a feature film from Warner Bros., with Leonardo DiCaprio among its producers.  Visit The Daily Cartoonist for more information. Watterson and his strip were also recently the focus of a documentary film.

According to Forbes, Bitstrips are now being used by French politicians to connect with the electorate. For the PCO‘s view on the popular automated ‘cartoons’, read this previous article.

The Round-up

April 12, 2013 in General, Links, News

© Ed Fisher/Cartoon Bank @Procartoonists.org

Cartoon captions are a major theme in this week’s Round-up. Bob Mankoff, cartoon editor of The New Yorker, looks back at the work of Ed Fisher (including the excellent meta-cartoon above), and also recalls some of the best caption contest entries by Roger Ebert. Both Ebert and Fisher passed away recently.

Over at The Telegraph, editorial cartoonist Christian Adams has unveiled his first caption competition, and is offering the original artwork as a prize for the best suggestion. Each contest will be topical, and this week’s features the late Baroness Thatcher. Head over to his blog to enter.

Unsurprisingly, Thatcher has been the subject of many cartoons in the past week or so. Gerald Scarfe, a cartoonist famous for his savage depictions of the former PM, talks about his relationship to his subject in this Q&A for the BBC. Elsewhere, David Ziggy Greene posts a piece he wrote and drew for French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo back in 2010. Read it here.

One of our members, the delightfully talented Gabriel Alborozo, has launched a new project. Simple Pleasures celebrates those small moments in life that make everything a little better. Alongside his own ideas, Gabe is taking suggestions from visitors to the site. You can also follow the project.

A new documentary film, Dear Mr. Watterson, celebrates the world of Calvin and Hobbes, while the strip’s creator, Bill Watterson, is also discussed in this article from Salon which argues that we should all respect the great man’s privacy.

The Round-up

June 16, 2012 in General, Links, News

© Posy Simmonds

An exhibition dedicated to the work of Posy Simmonds, the creator of Tamara Drewe, has opened in Belgium. Forbidden Planet has further details here, and Paul Gravett, who co-curated the show with Simmonds, writes extensively about her life and work on his blog.

To coincide with the recent Jubilee celebrations, The Guardian looked back at a David Low cartoon published by the newspaper to widespread controversy 60 years ago. The paper observes that depictions of the Royal Family have changed dramatically since then. Read the article here. Forbidden Planet also looks at the Low cartoon, and the satire that came later, in this blog post.

Pieces of original cartoon artwork can fetch healthy sums at auction, as proven by the recent sales of these works by Hergé and Bill Watterson.

The first East London Comics and Arts Festival (ELCAF) takes place in Shoreditch this Sunday, June 17. The event will feature live drawing by established illustrators, panel discussions and interviews, portfolio critique sessions, and a free evening concert. See the website for more details. For a round-up of other dates for your diary, click here.

 

The Round-up

February 24, 2012 in General, Links

Alex, Charles Peattie and Russell Taylor‘s City comic strip for The Daily Telegraph, is celebrating 25 satirical years. BBC Radio 4’s Today programme interviews the strip’s eponymous banker, left, and gets his take on the current state of the economy here. Meanwhile, academics at Oxford University say the Alex strip can be used to forecast the performance of financial markets.

Timed to coincide with the 200th anniversary of Charles Dickens‘ birth earlier this month, the New Yorker cartoon editor Bob Mankoff took a look back at some of the Dickensian cartoons by the late Bud Handelsman. If you haven’t already seen them, it’s worth a look.

A piece of original Calvin and Hobbes artwork by creator Bill Watterson has been sold for over $107,000.

Elsewhere, one man’s inherited comic collection has been auctioned off this week for $3.5 million.

Finally, Royal Mail are to celebrate 75 years of British comics next month with a new range of stamps, and Comic Book Alliance is offering a limited edition First Day Cover featuring all 10.

Creative Christmas

December 18, 2009 in Comment


This features the genius of Bill Watterson’s much-loved Calvin and Hobbes comic strip. It also highlights the good and bad nature of digital distribution of imagery, because strictly, this is a copyright violation. What do you think about it? Please tell us in the comments below. Spotted by Royston Robertson.