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by Royston

Cartoonists conquer new festival

October 20, 2016 in Events, General, News

The festival was officially opened at the Martin Honeysett exhibition and Hastings Museum and Art Gallery

The Hasting & 1066 Country Cartoon Festival was officially opened at the  Honeysett exhibition held at the Museum and Art Gallery

The first Hastings & 1066 Country Cartoon Festival took place on the weekend of October 15 and 16, to coincide with the 950th anniversary of the battle that changed the course of English history.

The cartoonists, mostly Professional Cartoonists Organisation members, expected to do battle with the elements, as it’s unusual to have an outdoor cartoon festival in October, but in fact the sun shone brightly on the Big Festival Day — 11am-5pm on the Sunday — and there was quite a buzz around the event.

Big board cartoons were drawn in a marquee on The Stade, on Hastings seafront. There were also two “community boards” for members of the public, both children and adults, to draw on, as live music and magic was performed throughout the day.

Bill Stott at work

Bill Stott, the PCO chairleg, at work on his big board

The Marquee on The Stade, where big board cartoons were drawn

The Marquee on The Stade, where big board cartoons were drawn

Opposite the marquee, in the slightly warmer Stade Hall, the main festival exhibition could be viewed and there were workshops, much drawing of caricatures and festival merchandise for sale.

Glenn Marshall attempted a recreation of the Bayeux Tapestry — but with funnnier gags — on a roll of wallpaper. But he hadn’t realised that the Tapestry is 70 metres long so he didn’t even make it to the battle. He has pledged to finish it by the 1,000th anniversary in 2066.

Passers-by and other artists helped Glenn Marshall recreate the Bayeux Tapestry (up to a point ...)

The public and other artists helped Glenn Marshall to recreate the story of the Bayeux Tapestry (up to a point …)

Workshops in The Stade Hall

Thinking and inking: workshops in The Stade Hall

The workshops for all ages were very well attended

The workshops for all ages were very well attended

It was one in the eye for Harold in this workshop

It was one in the eye for Harold in this workshop

On the Saturday there was a reception for an exhibition by the late Martin Honeysett, who lived in Hastings, at the town’s Museum and Art Gallery.

At this event, the festival was officially opened with a speech by Bill Stott, the PCO chairleg, and was followed by a cartoonists’ panel discussion and Q&A, including a slideshow of cartoons, with Royston Robertson, The Surreal McCoy, and the aforementioned Glenn Marshall.

The Surreal McCoy, centre, refused to take part in an eyebrow-raising contest with Royston, left, and Marshall

The Surreal McCoy, centre, refused to take part in an eyebrow-raising competition  with Royston Robertson, left, and Glenn Marshall

The other cartoonists taking part in the festival were Nathan Ariss, Jeremy Banx, Rupert Besley, Andrew Birch, Chris Burke, Denis Dowland, Clive Goddard and Cathy Simpson. They were joined by the French cartoonists Robert Rousso and Emmanuel Cerisier.

French cartoonist Robert Rousso, centre, in red, draws in The Stade Hall

French cartoonist Robert Rousso, centre, in red, draws in The Stade Hall

Also taking part in the event, and in workshops in the weeks leading up to the Big Festival Day, were the local artists James Brandow, Loulou Cousin, Scott Garrett, Ottilie Hainsworth, Julian Hanshaw, Jon Higham, Christopher Hoggins, Rachael House, Emily Johns, John Knowles, Robin Knowles and Andy Willard.

Many thanks must go to the organisers of the event: Penny Precious, Erica Smith and Pete Donohue. They hope to do it all again next year — and, who knows, maybe it will last until the 1,000th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings.

Visit the website: 1066cartoonfestival.co.uk

Photos: Denis Dowland, Royston Robertson and Mika Schick.

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by Royston

Sun shines on the Herne Bay Cartoon Festival yet again …

August 9, 2016 in General


We’ve shown you the photos of the parade of cartoonists at the Herne Bay Cartoon Festival, which knocked the Rio Olympics opening ceremony into a sun hat, now here are some great photos of the Bandstand event itself, as well as the event’s exhibition openings.

Photos © Kasia Kowalska. Click images to enlarge.

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Where to begin? Matt Buck opts, logically enough, for the top left-hand corner

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Steve gets Way down

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Des Buckley and Andrew Birch draw on the shared boards. Many cartoonists contributed to these, helping to build up several murals of seaside gags

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A seagull’s-eye view of the proceedings

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Rich Skipworth goes nose-to-nose with his big board cartoon

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Glenn Marshall paints his Photo-U booth. Later he sat inside and drew strips of passport-style cartoons for paying customers, raising money for Amnesty International. There was a permanent queue

"Photos" from the booth (see above)

“Photos” from the booth (see above)

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Pete Dredge in caricature mode. He also drew general cartoons for the public, along with Roger Penwill, as they queued for caricatures drawn by Alex Hughes

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Dave Brown creates another masterpiece

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Festival regular Karol Steele, second right, with her family, in caricature form

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Master of ceremonies Steve Coombes, left, and cartoonist Andrew Birch, with Jacob Watts, 6, one of the winners of the event’s Young Cartoonists Competition

Alex Hughes inspires a future generation. Pix © Chris Williams

Alex Hughes inspires a future generation. Pic © Chris Williams

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Clockwise from top left, Royston Robertson, Gerard Whyman and Chris Williams tackle the boards

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The cartoon workshop with Tim Harries was popular

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Singer Amelia Fletcher, who performed at the event with The Catenary Wires, contributes to the large public board

 

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Jeremy Banx and Rich Skipworth. Note “cartoonist as rock star” pose

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Cathy Simpson, right, offered advice and tips on the public board

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The Surreal McCoy contributes a shared-board gag

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Clive Goddard’s wonderfully inventive peep board, featuring, clockwise from top left, Amy Amani-Goddard, Steve Way, Clive himself, and Royston Robertson

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Chris Burke’s peep board. All the cartoonists were certainly in need of a beer after another sunny day’s cartooning at the Bandstand

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Earlier, on the Saturday, Cathy Simpson hosted a workshop on drawing monsters at Beach Creative, where the main festival exhibition was also held. Pic © Royston Robertson

There were private views of the festival exhibitions, including Glenn Marshall's Not Funny at One New Street art gallery. Here's the man himself in front of his Wall of Rejection

There were private views of the festival exhibitions, including Glenn Marshall’s Not Funny at One New Street  gallery. Here he is in front of his Wall of Rejection

Specially brewed ale was available with bespoke Marshall labels

Specially brewed ale was available with bespoke Marshall labels and badges

Cartoonist Rob Murray takes in the exhibition by the late David Hawker

Cartoonist Rob Murray takes in the exhibition by late punch cartoonist David Hawker, at a private view at the tiny Bay Art Gallery. Pic © Royston Robertson

Rupert Besley, left who co-organised the Hawker exhibition, with Nathan Ariss

Rupert Besley, left, who co-organised the Hawker show, with Nathan Ariss

Postcards from the Seaside, the main festival exhibition, was opened by Sir Roger Gale, left, with Steve Coombes, the Thanet North MP. The postcard featured new cartoons by dozens of cartoonists riffing on the idea of seaside postcards, as well as a small exhibition of prosecuted cards by Donald McGill, king of the saucy postcard

Postcards from the Seaside, the main festival exhibition, was opened by Sir Roger Gale, left, the Thanet North MP, with Steve Coombes,

The show featured new cartoons by dozens of cartoonists on the theme of seaside postcards, here about to be hung, as well as a small exhibition of prosecuted cards by Donald McGill, king of the saucy postcard

The show featured new cartoons by dozens of cartoonists on the theme of seaside postcards, here about to be hung, as well as a small exhibition of prosecuted cards by Donald McGill, king of the saucy postcard. Pic © Royston Robertson

The show featured new cartoons by dozens of cartoonists on the theme of seaside postcards, as well as a small exhibition of prosecuted cards by Donald McGill, king of the saucy postcard. Article from Herne Bay Gazette, click to enlarge

Article from Herne Bay Gazette, click to enlarge

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by Royston

Herne Bay Cartoon Festival 2016:

No rain on this parade

August 4, 2016 in General

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The sun shone brightly on the Herne Bay Cartoon Festival for the fourth year running, bringing thousands of people to the town’s Bandstand on Sunday for a truly memorable day.

It began with a parade of cartoonists conducted by organiser Steve Coombes (above, with back to camera). They wielded large pencils and banners and played Oh, I Do Like to Be Beside the Seaside on ukuleles.

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The cartoonists then gathered for a group photo before the drawing began. Click to enlarge and see those happy, smiling faces!

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Pictured, left to right, are:

Back row: Gerard Whyman, Roger Penwill, Rich Skipworth, Rob Murray, Chris Burke, Tim Harries, Des Buckley, Chris Williams, Alex Hughes and Dave Brown. Middle row: Cathy Simpson, The Surreal McCoy, Royston Robertson, Wilbur Dawbarn, Glenn Marshall, Pete Dredge, Clive Goddard and Simon Ellinas. Front row, kneeling: Jeremy Banx, Matt Buck, Steve Way, Rupert Besley and Andrew Birch.

We’ll have more pictures from the 2016 Herne Bay Cartoon festival later.

Pictures © Kasia Kowalska.

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by Royston

Herne Bay Cartoon Festival 2016

July 24, 2016 in Events, General, News

Herne Bay Cartoon Festival 2016
The fourth Herne Bay Cartoon Festival takes place next month. The festival’s flagship live event will be held, as usual, in the Bandstand on the seafront, on Sunday 31 July.

More than 20 cartoonists from all over the country will be there to draw big-board cartoons, cartoon murals, caricatures and to host workshops. There will also be opportunities for the public to release their inner cartoonists and a few surprises and other general silliness.

The main festival exhibition, Postcards from the Seaside, is currently being put together and will feature cartoons all about the seaside, many offering modern spins on the classic saucy seaside postcards drawn by the likes of Donald McGill, much as the Independent cartoonist Dave Brown has done in the brilliant poster, above.

The exhibition opens at the Beach Creative gallery on Tuesday 26 July and runs until Sunday 14 August.

There will also be an exhibition of the work of the Punch cartoonist David Hawker, who died last August. Original cartoons by Hawker, who specialised in poking fun at petty middle-class concerns, can be seen at the Bay Art Gallery, on the same dates as the Beach Creative show.

Giles at the Seaside

Kicking off the festival, from Saturday 2 July, the Seaside Museum will host the exhibition Giles at the Seaside. Featuring a selection of seaside-themed cartoons by the much-loved Daily Express cartoonist, and spanning more than five decades, it is run in conjunction with the British Cartoon Archive in Canterbury.

This year also sees the launch of the festival’s first East Kent Young Cartoonists competition. There will be prizes for the winners and the best entries will be displayed during the festival.

To link in with that, there will be cartoon workshops at the Seaside Museum on 9 July, with myself and fellow PCO member Des Buckley.

Herne Bay Cartoon Workshop

And there’s more … but it’s all still being worked out. For updates follow @HBCartoonFest on Twitter or go to Facebook.com/HBCartoonFest

The Herne Bay Cartoon Festival is sponsored by the Professional Cartoonists Organisation and supported using public funding by Arts Council England.

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by Royston

On the fringes at Herne Bay

July 7, 2016 in Events, General, News

Glenn Marshall Not Funny poster

Like any good festival, the Herne Bay Cartoon Festival has a fringe. And his name is Glenn Marshall. He writes:

The cartoonists who get exhibitions are the successful, good ones. This exhibition sets to redress the balance.

Full of ideas that don’t quite work, drawings that don’t quite look right and text that is completely illegible, it’s a story of pain, ridicule and regret. Let’s celebrate the mediocre!

Sadly my cartoon anthology that the exhibition was due to coincide with is still in early development, see below, but I will be having “The Book Launch Without A Book” over the festival weekend.

Glenn Marshall Not Funny portfolio

Thanks Glenn! The cartoon exhibition is at One New Street gallery and is sponsored by The Bay Brewer.

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by Royston

Herne Bay: the exhibitions

August 9, 2015 in Events, General, News

Private view of the Lines in the Sand exhibition. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Private view of the Lines in the Sand exhibition. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Three exhibitions were held at the Herne Bay Cartoon Festival this year. Private views for two of those took place on 1 August, the day before the festival’s main live-drawing event. Photos by Kasia Kowalska and Gerard Whyman.

Photo © Gerard Whyman

Photo © Gerard Whyman

Photo © Kasia Kowalska

The Independent’s Dave Brown with his work. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Lines in the Sand, the main festival exhibition, featured work by more than 50 artists. There were cartoons on the subjects of seaside and surrealism, as is usual at Herne Bay, plus there was a room dedicated to cartoons on the fallout from the Charlie Hebdo massacre in January. The book Draw the Line Here was on sale at the exhibition.

There was even some drawing on the walls by the cartoonists. Here's Nathan Ariss and Tim Sanders in action. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

There were lines drawn on the wall at the Lines in the Sand viewing. Here are cartoonists Nathan Ariss and Tim Sanders in action. Photos © Kasia Kowalska

There was also a viewing of the exhibition in tribute to the late Martin Honeysett at the Bay Art Gallery. That was opened by Sir Roger Gale, the Herne Bay MP.

Sir Roger Gale, the town's MP, opened the exhibition of Martin Honeysett cartoons. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Sir Roger Gale opened the exhibition of Martin Honeysett cartoons. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

One of Honeysett's timelessly brilliant cartoons. Photo © Gerard Whyman

One of Honeysett’s timelessly brilliant cartoons. Photo © Gerard Whyman

Sir Roger Gale with Steve Coombes, one of the festival organisers, and Penny Precious, Martin Honeysett's widow, who curated the exhibition. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Sir Roger Gale with Steve Coombes, one of the festival organisers, and Penny Precious, Martin Honeysett’s widow, who curated the exhibition. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

On the previous evening there was a viewing of Outrage! A brief history of offensive cartoons, the third festival exhibition, held at the Seaside Museum. It featured work from the British Cartoon Archive in Canterbury. But there was also a never-before-seen Ralph Steadman, his response to the Charlie Hebdo massacre.

Steve Coombes at the Outrage! exhibition with Ralph Steadman's cartoon. Photo © Steve Coombes

Steve Coombes at the Outrage! exhibition with Ralph Steadman’s cartoon. Photo © Steve Coombes

As if all this wasn’t enough, for the first time this year the festival has a fringe exhibition! The One New Street gallery showed a small exhibition called Not Just Cartoons, featuring Glenn Marshall, Ingram Pinn and others.

Promotional mug at the One New Street Gallery, featuring Glenn Marshall. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Promotional mug at the One New Street Gallery, featuring Glenn Marshall. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Alice in Cartoon Land at Cartoon Museum

July 16, 2015 in Events, News

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ALICE IN CARTOON Land is the current exhibition at the Cartoon Museum in London. 150 years after the publication of Lewis Carroll’s world famous story about the little girl’s magical adventures with a bewildering array of strange characters and weird experiences, the Cartoon Museum has put up a display organised by writer and broadcaster Brian Sibley, a prominent member of the Lewis Carroll Society.

Cartoon Museum Brian Sibley

Photo by Kasia Kowalska

The exhibition features works from across the decades by cartoonists who have featured Alice themes in their cartoons. Artists represented range from Low, Vicky, Shepard and Illingworth to via Searle and ffolkes to Scarfe, Steadman and Rowson. There are Alice posters by Gilroy advertising Guinness, cartoon strips featuring Flook and Snoopy, pages from comics and graphic novels and original animation art from film and TV versions of Alice. There is also one wall of freshly-drawn cartoons by Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation members.

Cartoons by PCO

The event was very well attended, with cartooning luminaries such as Steve Bell and Dave Brown and Bryan Talbot, writer and artist of many graphic novels.

cartoonists Bell and Brown

Photo by Kasia Kowalska

 

 

 

In the view of the blog editor, this is one of the best cartoon exhibitions the Museum has put on in a long time, such is the length, breadth and variety of artworks and ephemera on show. Perhaps it just goes to show how inspiring to artists Charles Dodgson’s original masterpiece has always been. Well worth a visit and a vote of congratulations and thanks to Brian Sibley and Carton Museum curators, Anita O’Brien and Sarah Batten.

Cartoon Museum's Anita O'Brien and Sarah Batten

Photo by Kasia Kowalska

 

 

 

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by Royston

Herne Bay Cartoon Festival approaches

July 1, 2015 in Events, General, News

Herne Bay Cartoon Festival poster by Jeremy Banx

With the scorching hot weather we’re having, it’s a good time to think about planning a trip to the seaside. And Herne Bay in Kent is just the place to go.

The third Herne Bay Cartoon Festival begins later this month with an exhibition called Lines in the Sand opening at the Beach Creative gallery on 28 July. As you can see from the excellent poster above, by Procartoonists.org member Jeremy Banx, there will also be a live cartooning day in the Bandstand on the sea front once again, with big board cartoons, caricatures, and a few surprises. That takes place on Sunday 2 August.

This year there will also be an exhibition of cartoons from the British Cartoon Archive, on the history of cartoons and people taking offence at them, as well as a show in tribute to the late Martin Honeysett, who exhibited and appeared at the first two Herne Bay cartoon events.

This year’s event builds on the success of the first one, when it was part of a Marcel Duchamp celebration, and last year’s standalone Cartoonists Beside the Surrealside. It sponsored by the PCO and supported using public funding by Arts Council England.

We’ll have more on the festival nearer the time. Meanwhile, you can seen lots more PCO coverage of the previous two events, including great videos by David Good, in the Herne Bay archive.

PCO Annual Committee Meeting and Chris Beetles Gallery

May 6, 2015 in Events, News

Chris Beetles Cartoon Gallery - Sign

THE OCCASION of the Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation’s Annual Committee Meeting in London gave rise to the perfect excuse to take advantage of the invite to a Chris Beetles Gallery private viewing.

The Americans Are Coming is a major selling exhibition of 300 cartoons and illustrations showcasing the best of American Cartoon Art from the last 100 years. And what a show it was.

American Cartoons in Chris Beetles Gallery

 

There was a staggering number of exhibits by legends such as Al Hirschfeld, David Levine, Edward Sorel and Charles Addams just to name a few.

Cartoons by Al Hirschfeld Chris Beetles Gallery

Live, in person, were Arnold Roth, Pat Oliphant and Edward Koren, each of whom were introduced by cartoonist, filmmaker and ex-Python Terry Gilliam. Pat Oliphant was drawing a large Uncle Sam. When asked if he was enjoying working live he said: “It means I don’t have to make conversation!” A further enquiry about what he thought about the current crop of American cartoonists (with the Daryl Cagle network in mind) prompted the dry: “I try not to think about them at all!”

Cartoonist Pat Oliphant drawing

 

Terry Gilliam made the very heartfelt point about works of art, paintings, sculptures etc being given pride of place in living rooms whereas cartoon art is always traditionally reserved for toilets. A situation of perception that he wished could be changed. “Cartoon Art belongs in the living rooms” he could be paraphrased as saying.

Cartoonist and Python Terry Gilliam

As usual, the hustle and bustle of a private viewing meant that it was difficult to see everything comfortably, so this exhibition is one that definitely deserves repeated visits.

The exhibition, The Americans Are Coming, runs at The Chris Beetles Gallery, 8 – 10 Ryder Street, London SW1Y 6QB, from now until Saturday May 30th.

 

 

Shrewsbury International Cartoon Festival 2015

April 20, 2015 in News

AS USUAL, IT seems like a dream now. As with most Cartoon Festivals, they come and go in a flash with so many activities and social get-togethers lubricated by the products of many hostelries that ‘real life’ doesn’t seem real for the first couple of days back home.

The Twelfth Shrewsbury International Cartoon Festival (yes – TWELFTH!) went off with its customary sparkle provided by the town’s influx of cartoonists from all over the country. Oh, and one all the way from Australia, Dean Alston, just so that the ‘international’ tag could be legitimized!

The high-quality exhibition at the Bear Steps Gallery was on the theme of ‘Style’ this year and it was probably as loose-fitting a theme as you could get allowing an awful lot of leg-room for cartoony inspiration. Shrewsbury is spoiled by having a unique exhibition like this every year – on display for over a month, not just during the festival weekend.

The Market Square, as always provided a focal point for the public to spot cartoonists and caricaturists at work. The well-established favourites, the Big Boards, were as usual becoming repositories for brilliant works of cartoon art and well-thought out gags. The new concept of ‘cartoon busking’, initially performed by Roger Penwill and Noel Ford and the ‘quick-on-the-draw’ style entertainment of the Cartoon Melodrawma were more ingenious ways of bringing the concept of cartooning memorably under the public gaze. Workshops in both caricaturing and comic strips were on offer, thanks to Terry Anderson and Tim Harries and Guardian cartoonist Martin Rowson gave an illustrated talk on his view of the last five years of a coalition government.

As usual, the cartoonists sampled the hospitality of various establishments around the town and left the paper tabelcoths in the Henry Tudor House restaurant liberally spattered with cartoony inspiration.

Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival is probably the longest-running UK cartoon festival ever and its organisers are already meeting to discuss the agenda for the thirteenth one in 2016. Contrary to traditional belief, that’s a lucky number for many people.