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The Round-up

June 4, 2014 in Events, General, Links, News

Never Again, World War One in Cartoon and Comic Art, will be held at the Cartoon Museum

Never Again, World War One in Cartoon and Comic Art, will be held at the Cartoon Museum

Kasia Kowalska writes:

The next exhibition to at the Cartoon Museum in London is titled Never Again and will be on the subject of cartoons drawn during the First World War. It will run from 11 June to 19 October. Until then, there is still time to catch the Spitting Image 30th anniversary exhibitionwhich ends on 8 June.

Private Eye’s Scene & Heard comic strip, by Procartoonists.org member David Ziggy Greene, is to be published in hardback at the end of the month. The cartoonist is currently choosing the 50 strips that will feature.

The artist/cartoonist David Shrigley talks to The Guardian about how it is difficult in the world of fine art to have a comic voice.

Alex Salmond cartoon © Brian Adcock

Alex Salmond cartoon © Brian Adcock. Click to enlarge

The Norfolk-based cartoonist Brian Adcock is celebrating a hat-trick at the Scottish Press Awards this year. He is best known for his political cartoons for The Scotsman and The Independent.

Meanwhile, another political cartoonist, Christian Adams of the Telegraph, has given behind-the-scenes access to his cartooning process via Instagram. And if you have Sky Atlantic, you probably want to tune in at 9pm tonight (4 June) to see For No Good Reason, the documentary about Ralph Steadman.

© Michael Heath. The cartoonist's first ever cartoon for The Spectator

© Michael Heath. The cartoonist’s first ever gag for The Spectator, from 1960

A new Twitter feed has been set up to showcase cartoons from The Spectator, old and new. It kicked off this week with the magazine’s first ever cartoon by Michael Heath, its cartoon editor, from 1960, above.

If you are a fan of the comics artist Dave McKean, do not miss the UK premiere of 9 Lives at the British Library on 6 June. The collection of songs, images and animation was first shown at Sydney Opera House last October and coincides with the Comics Unmasked exhibitionMeanwhile, it has been announced that the 5th International Graphic Novel and Comics Conference will be hosted at the library in July.

Returning to the centenary of the First World War, two other exhibitions open this month: Enduring War: Grief, Grit and Humour at the British Library, which is to examine how people coped with life during the conflict, and Charley’s War at Durlston Country Park, near Swanage, which will display artwork by Joe Colquhoun from the acclaimed comic strip.

Finally, this is great fun and very clever: the storyboard artist Marty Cooper takes an animated look at ordinary objects.

The Round-up

December 12, 2013 in General, Links, News

© Peter Brookes @Procartoonists.org

The death of Nelson Mandela inspired poignant tributes from UK cartoonists, among them Peter Brookes in The Times (above), Peter Schrank in The Independent and Christian Adams in The Telegraph. Elsewhere, the South African cartoonist Zapiro tells the BBC a personal anecdote that demonstrates Mandela’s appreciation of satire.

Congratulations to Len Hawkins, who has been named the first-ever recipient of The Spectator’s Michael Heath Award for Cartooning. Already an established gag cartoonist, Len has won a year’s contract with the magazine, an original drawing by Heath, a bottle of gin, and a hand-made pair of shoes from John Lobb, which sponsored the competition.

Bill Watterson, creator of the much-loved Calvin and Hobbes comic strip, looks set to be the subject of a feature film from Warner Bros., with Leonardo DiCaprio among its producers.  Visit The Daily Cartoonist for more information. Watterson and his strip were also recently the focus of a documentary film.

According to Forbes, Bitstrips are now being used by French politicians to connect with the electorate. For the PCO‘s view on the popular automated ‘cartoons’, read this previous article.

The Round-up

July 15, 2013 in General, Links, News

Chris Burke in his studio © Anke @Procartoonists.org

Chris Burke, the widely published caricaturist and illustrator – and Procartoonists.org member – gives a local blog a tour of his home and studio in Royal Tunbridge Wells. Read the resulting feature interview, and see plenty of examples of Chris’ work,  here.

The Guardian has an interview with David Fickling and family – the tribe behind weekly comic The Phoenix – told in comic-strip format.

Charlie Paul, director of the Ralph Steadman documentary For No Good Reason, shares a short time-lapse film showing the Procartoonists.org member in action. (Brought to our attention by the Cartoon Museum – follow them on Twitter: @cartoonmuseumuk.)

Following a long-awaited British – or is that Scottish? – victory in the men’s singles event at Wimbledon, Andy Murray has been popping up in many a cartoon. He appears alongside his mother, Judy, in the 75th anniversary issue of The Beano; has been knighted courtesy of Procartoonist Andy Davey in The Sun; and was cynically adopted by the politicians, in cartoons by Christian Adams for The Telegraph and Peter Brookes for The Times.

The Round-up

June 8, 2013 in Events, General, Links, News

© Bert Hackett @Procartoonists.org

Arts venue mac birmingham is planning to host an exhibition of more than 100 artworks by Bert ‘Gemini’ Hackett, long-time cartoonist for The Birmingham Post. Donations are being sought towards the running of the show, and the appeal closes on 16 June. The exhibition will run from 29 June until 1 September. More details can be found here.

The New York Times profiles Khalid Albaih, ‘a cartoonist with an attitude’ who has inspired discontented youth across the Arab world. Read the article here.

Christian Adams, the political cartoonist for The Telegraph, has posted this short video showing how he roughs out one of his cartoons.

Christopher Booker – the first editor of Private Eye – writes for The Spectator about the short but brilliant career of cartoonist Timothy Birdsall. Read Booker’s article here.

Cartoons feature in a new exhibition exploring the emerging art scene in Iraq, as the BBC reports.

Ralph Steadman has designed a poster for the upcoming Duchamp Centenary Celebration in Herne Bay, which recognises the famous Dadaist‘s connections to the Kent town. Our chairman, Nathan Ariss, comments on Steadman’s involvement with the festival in this article.

The Round-up

May 10, 2013 in Events, General, Links, News

© Christian Adams for The Telegraph @Procartoonists.org

The Premier League was rocked this week by the unexpected news of Sir Alex Ferguson‘s retirement, and cartoonists had a ball with it (sorry). In The Telegraph, Christian Adams put the news in context (above), while Matt Pritchett drew parallels with another recent shock resignation. Over in The Guardian, Kipper Williams considered the impact on industry. On the news that David Moyes is taking the reins, Procartoonists.org member Andy Davey pictures the handover in The Sun.

Rob Murray (full disclosure: the writer of this post!) will be opening up his studio to the public from 16-19 May, exhibiting and selling original cartoons from Private Eye, Reader’s Digest, The Spectator and elsewhere as part of the Summer Open Studios show at Wimbledon Art Studios. Entry is free and all are very welcome.

Stephen Collins celebrates the publication of his new book, The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil, with a launch party this evening at Gosh! in London. See preview pages in the ‘Big Comics’ section of his website.

Own-it offers a helpful and concise look at the ongoing controversial changes to UK copyright legislation, which pave the way for licensing of orphan works. Read it here.

An obituary for Margaret Groening reveals that her son – Simpsons creator Matt – believes in writing about what (or who) he knows. The Telegraph picks up on the story and provides this handy interactive family tree.

And finally, having recently challenged New Yorker cartoonists to a reverse-engineered caption contest, cartoon editor Bob Mankoff invites readers to have a go.

 

The Round-up

April 12, 2013 in General, Links, News

© Ed Fisher/Cartoon Bank @Procartoonists.org

Cartoon captions are a major theme in this week’s Round-up. Bob Mankoff, cartoon editor of The New Yorker, looks back at the work of Ed Fisher (including the excellent meta-cartoon above), and also recalls some of the best caption contest entries by Roger Ebert. Both Ebert and Fisher passed away recently.

Over at The Telegraph, editorial cartoonist Christian Adams has unveiled his first caption competition, and is offering the original artwork as a prize for the best suggestion. Each contest will be topical, and this week’s features the late Baroness Thatcher. Head over to his blog to enter.

Unsurprisingly, Thatcher has been the subject of many cartoons in the past week or so. Gerald Scarfe, a cartoonist famous for his savage depictions of the former PM, talks about his relationship to his subject in this Q&A for the BBC. Elsewhere, David Ziggy Greene posts a piece he wrote and drew for French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo back in 2010. Read it here.

One of our members, the delightfully talented Gabriel Alborozo, has launched a new project. Simple Pleasures celebrates those small moments in life that make everything a little better. Alongside his own ideas, Gabe is taking suggestions from visitors to the site. You can also follow the project.

A new documentary film, Dear Mr. Watterson, celebrates the world of Calvin and Hobbes, while the strip’s creator, Bill Watterson, is also discussed in this article from Salon which argues that we should all respect the great man’s privacy.

The Round-up

February 1, 2013 in General, Links, News

Above: a timely rant from animator Stephen Silver about the perils of agreeing to produce creative work ‘on spec’. (Originally seen at Tom’s Mad Blog)

The HS2 rail proposal provided plenty of fodder for cartoonists on the dailies this week. For The Telegraph, Christian Adams assesses George Osborne’s involvement here and here, while Matt Pritchett suggests a get-out clause. In The Daily Mail, Mac focused on what might almost turn out to be the reality for commuters. Meanwhile, Procartoonists.org member Steve Bell looks down the track for The Guardian.

Bell’s stablemate at the Guardian, fellow PCO member Martin Rowson, is interviewed for the paper alongside comedian (and occasional cartoonist) Phill Jupitus. Read the Q&A here.

After his car was towed away, New Yorker cartoonist Corey Pandolph decided to sell some of his ‘unselected’ cartoons on Etsy to cover his costs. The Huffington Post has more on Pandolph’s plight here.

Finally, a selection of drawings by the late, great Ronald Searle is set to be offered at auction.

Avatar of Royston

by Royston

Isn’t it funny what’s not funny?

January 17, 2013 in Comment, General, Links

Ian Baker cartoon

Cartoon © Ian Baker @ Procartoonists.org

Here’s a very funny cartoon. But why is it funny? Well, E.B. White famously said that “analysing comedy is like dissecting a frog; no one laughs and the frog dies”. So let’s not go there.

Instead, our eye was drawn to a blog post by the cartoonist Christian Adams, in which he simply provides a definitive list of what is funny and what is not funny.

Of course, you can still argue with it, and roll your eyes like Woody Allen in Crimes and Misdemeanours when Alan Alda opines: “If it bends, it’s funny. If it breaks, it isn’t”, but the important fact is that no amphibians were harmed during the making of this blog post.

And, even more importantly, you’ll find lots of cartoons that can definitely be classed as funny in the Procartoonists.org portfolios.

The post-Christmas Round-up

December 28, 2012 in General, Links, News

© Robert Thompson @Procartoonists.org

The gifts may have been exchanged and the turkey polished off, but there’s still time for a few festive treats of the cartooning variety that may have escaped your attention over the Christmas period.

You can enjoy every installment of Peattie and Taylor‘s 15-part seasonal Alex tale, It’s A Wonderful Crisis, as it unfolds over at the Telegraph site.

Quentin Blake becomes a Sir in the new Year’s Honours. The BBC describes him as  an illustrator*.

Procartoonists.org member Royston Robertson has put together a cartoon advent calendar again this year, with a different gag posted to his blog each day in the run-up to Christmas. Take a look at Royston’s festive goodies here. Elsewhere, The Telegraph’s Matt Pritchett provides a topical – but far less appealing – advent calendar of his own.

Ben Jennings brings a Dickensian feel to proceedings over at The Guardian, while Martin Rowson riffs on the Slaughter of the Innocents for the same paper. At The Telegraph, Christian Adams has his own take on Plebgate.

For The Independent, Dave Brown cautions against festive overeating and Peter Schrank brings a topical slant to the Christmas sales. Finally, Stephen Collins takes the PM on a merry chase for The Spectator.

* Please feel to discuss ‘what’ he is in the comments should you be so minded.

Procartoonists bag couple of CATs

December 10, 2012 in Events, News

The Cartoon Art Trust Awards, an annual fundraiser for the Cartoon Museum in London, were held last week, and this year’s winners, including two Procartoonists.org members were as follows:

Christmas cartoon by KJ Lamb

Cartoon © KJ Lamb

Joke cartoonist Kathryn Lamb, above, (Private Eye, The Oldie, The Spectator)

Strip cartoonist Steve Bell for “If …” (The Guardian)

Pocket cartoonist Banx (aka Jeremy Banks, Financial Times)

Caricaturist James Ferguson (Financial Times)

Political cartoonist Christian Adams (Daily and Sunday Telegraph)

Congratulations to all the winners.