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The Round-up

November 24, 2012 in General, Links, News

© Dave Walker @Procartoonists.org

Dave Walker, regular contributor to Church Times and a member of Procartoonists.org, produced the cartoon above for The Guardian this week, following the Church of England’s decision to reject the ordination of women bishops. Dave’s cartoon has attracted more than 100 comments, and counting.

Having moved into greeting card designs, Matthew Inman – the cartoonist behind US website The Oatmeal – is being sued for trademark infringement. Inman was involved in another legal rights battle earlier in the year, against online content aggregator FunnyJunk. In that instance, FunnyJunk had been using Oatmeal material without permission – but bizarrely issued a lawsuit against Inman. Refresh your memory by reading our coverage of the case.

Darren Davis, the man behind independent comics publisher Bluewater Productions, is embracing a move into digital publishing, but is finding another side of the internet – online criticism – hard to take.

The New Yorker has published its third annual ‘bookazine’ cartoon compilation. The New Yorker Cartoons of the Year 2012 features more than 250 of the best gags that have run in the magazine this year, along with new material. No word yet on whether it will be distributed outside the US, but previous editions have made their way to the UK courtesy of discerning stockists including the London Review Bookshop.

Legal wildlife hunts Oatmeal

June 21, 2012 in Comment, General, News

Last week we noted that Matthew Inman, writer of the Oatmeal, a popular US web comic, was being pursued by the threat of lawsuit following an unusual exchange of letters about copyright claims and intellectual property infringements.

The lawyer making claim against Inman, Charles Carreon, is acting for FunnyJunk, an online content aggregator, and he has now published the lengthy 45 page lawsuit at his website. In response, San Francisco based digital free speech lobbyists, the Electronic Frontier Foundation have announced they are now to have a part in representing Inman. This strange web comic case seems set to grow into a serious battle about the right to express cartoon or comic opinion on digital publishing platforms. The last link, published at The Guardian, and taking a wider look at the problems of online opinion, is credited to Canadian journalist Danny Bradbury.

The Washington Post also report the story and Andrew Orlowski of the Register explains some of the underlying issues about difficulties in challenging copyright infringement.