You are browsing the archive for Garfield.

The Round-up

June 17, 2014 in Events, General, Links, News

Kipper Williams draws Duchamp in Herne Bay. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Kipper Williams draws Duchamp in Herne Bay. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Kasia Kowalska writes:

The Marcel Duchamp in Herne Bay Festival, which many Procartoonists members took part in, has won a hat-trick of gongs at the Culture Awards for East Kent. It was given the experience award, best project involving the wider community and the people’s award — the latter voted by the public. Our congratulations go to the organisers and all involved in the event.

Andy Davey, former Procartoonists.org chairman, shares his thoughts about the future of political cartoons with the ITV News reporter Olivia Paterson.

Another PCO member, Harry Harrison, draws attention to the importance of political cartoons in press freedom by taking part in an exhibition at the Foreign Correspondents’ Club in Hong Kong.

The controversial El Jueves cover

The controversial El Jueves cover

The Spanish satirical magazine, El Jueves, was involved in a censorship row when many prominent cartoonists — Albert Monteys and Manel Fontdevila among them — resigned following the unprecedented pulping of the magazine’s issue featuring a cartoon of the abdicating king, Juan Carlos, and the future king, Felipe VI above.

For the past 37 years, El Jueves has been an unwavering voice of social and political commentary in the country. The disgruntled cartoonists are rumoured to be setting up a rival publication.

Cartoon © Dave Brown of The Independent

Cartoon © Dave Brown of The Independent. Click to enlarge

In light of the recent events in the Middle East, the debate surrounding the legacy of the invasion of Iraq in 2003 continues, with The Independent publishing a chilling editorial cartoon by new Procartoonists.org member Dave Brown, above, based on Turner’s Death on a Pale Horse. PolicyMic.com considers the history of British meddling in the Middle East as told in ten classic cartoons.

If that’s not quite enough for you, Peter Casillas, a self-proclaimed “cartoon junkie”, has created an extensive database of cartoons charting the history of the region from 1853 to the present, called A Cartoon History of the Middle East.

Pat Mills at the Cartoon Museum. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Pat Mills at the Cartoon Museum. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

The exhibition Never Again! World War One in Cartoon and Comic Art was opened last week by Pat Mills, above, of Charley’s War fame. He will be giving a talk to tie in with the exhibition in October.

The Huffington Post features a series of cartoons on climate change. The Danish Niels Bugge Cartoon Award 2014 organised an international competition titled Oceans Are in Our Hands.

For the inspired budding cartoonist, there is still time to take part in the NOISE Festival 2014 which aims to give a platform to undiscovered talent. One of the curators is Gerald Scarfe. Entries must be in by 6 July.

Finally, Jim Davis shows how to draw a very famous ginger cat who turns 36 this week using a Wacom Cintiq in this short video. But if you are more of a dog person, this should prick up yours ears.

Profile photo of Royston

by Royston

The Round-up

April 24, 2014 in Events, General, Links, News

Cartoon © Graeme Keyes

Cartoon © Graeme Keyes


The BBC has been looking at how political cartoonists in Northern Ireland coped with covering the Troubles. You can read the article and see an episode of BBC Northern Ireland’s The Arts Show (until 28 April) here.

Meanwhile, in the Republic of Ireland, The Irish Times has apologised for a cartoon about priests by Martyn Turner, calling it “an editorial lapse”. Read more about it and see the offending cartoon here. We ran a profile of Turner in February.

Gerald Scarfe is to judge submissions made by budding cartoonists and illustrators to the Noise Festival. The deadline is 31 May. You can read more on the Noise Festival here, and they have an interview with Scarfe, talking about what he will be looking for, here. Meanwhile, Scarfe has also been talking to The Big Issue.

The New Yorker is widely regarded as the home of sophisticated cartoons and is a hugely competitive market for cartoonists. But Ted Rall is not a fan and argues that it is, in fact, bad for cartooning.

poster_garfield

Famous cartoon characters from all over the world have gone bald, in an initiative in Brazil designed to send out the message that a child with cancer deserves to be seen just like any other child: Bald Cartoons.

Finally, you may have heard that British Pathé has put a large chunk of its archive online for free. This will, of course, mean there are some cartoon and comic-related gems, such as this film about the creation of Dan Dare.

The Round-up

May 6, 2012 in General

If you are a fan of funding crowd-sourced books we commend the following projects from two Procartoonists.org members: Stevyn Colgan‘s Connectoscope and the caricaturist Adrian Teal, who is still raising funds for his Gin Lane Gazette. You can contribute to funding these projects at the Unbound site.

Terry Mosher, a Canadian political cartoonist best known by his pen name of Aislin, has been inducted into the country’s Cartoonist Hall of Fame this weekend. In an interview with the Daily Brew blog, he discusses his work and explains that conservatives are easier to satirise than liberals because “the fatter the cat, the more fun you have”. Read the Q&A here.

Daniel Clowes, the creator of Ghost World and Eightball, is the subject of a new gallery exhibition in his hometown of Oakland, California. If you can’t make it over there, read this instead.

With Garfield making the move into full-length comic books, the cartoon cat’s creator, Jim Davis, speaks to Comic Book Resources about adapting his character to different formats – and about what the decline of newspapers and rise of the internet can mean for up-and-coming cartoonists. Read more here.

Cartoons and cartoonists to feature on US postage stamps

January 6, 2010 in Comment

mauldinstampThe US Postal Service is to honour cartoonist Bill Mauldin with a postage stamp, due to be released in March 2010. Mauldin, who served with the 44th Infantry Division during World War II drew cartoons about ordinary soldiers for Stars and Stripes, the US Army’s newspaper. He was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1945 and died in 2003 aged 81.

calvinandhobbesstamp-456Also released this year is a series of stamps featuring characters from US comic strips, including Calvin and Hobbes, Garfield and Beetle Bailey. The set, titled Sunday Funnies is due to go on sale in July.

Bloghorn asks: What cartoonists or comic characters would you like to see on British postage stamps?