You are browsing the archive for Garry Trudeau.

The Round-up

July 15, 2014 in Events, General, Links, News

Noel Ford cartoon

© Noel Ford

Kasia Kowalska and Royston Robertson write:

Cartoonists including the PCO members Bill Stott and Noel Ford, above, are involved in the first Southport Festival of ArtMore on that here.

An exhibition of Tony Husband’s Private Eye cartoons is on display at The Swan in Dobcross as part of the Greater Manchester Fringe Festival until the end of July.

What a week for Marvel, which hit the headlines by showing that it is not afraid of change, announcing future comics in which Thor becomes a woman (but don’t dare call her Thora!) and Captain America will be black

The Guardian reports on the response to the conflict in Gaza by cartoonists in the Arab nations, in particular on the lack of action to from their governments.

A death sentence has been pronounced via Twitter for the Kuwati-born comic-book artist Naif Al-Mutawa by the Islamist militant group Isis. Meanwhile, in the UK, a former Islamist extremist has created a series of cartoons aimed at young British Muslims, titled Abdullah-X, writes Jack Simpson in The Independent.

In the US, Bob Mankoff talks about his cartoon editing role at The New Yorker and why it may just be the best job in the world in this interview with Survey MonkeyGarry Trudeau talks to the LA Times about how working on his Doonesbury strip helped him to prepare for his new TV series Alpha House.

Bob Moran exhibition

© Bob Moran

Bob Moran has an exhibition of cartoons drawn for the Telegraph in his hometown of Petersfield, Hampshire (details above). “This exhibition is generating a lot of hype,” he says on Twitter, “with local people describing it as ‘happening’ and ‘something to do’.”

Dozens of insightful musings about making comics and cartoons have been published by Michael Cavna of The Washington Post in celebration of the 6th birthday of his Comic Riffs column. The art of cartooning is no laughing matter,  according to this article about a new exhibition on Martha’s Vineyard in the US.

This week also marks the 81st anniversary of the first film appearance of Popeye. Greg Belfrage provides insight (and several episodes) here. Meawhile, remembering Mel Blanc, who died 25 years ago this month, the Express offers  up “Top 10 facts about cartoons”.

Finally, these are very clever and great fun: 15 household objects transformed Into cartoon characters by the French artist Gilbert Legrand.

The Round-up

February 23, 2014 in Events, General, Links, News

Thatcher Cutting Up Britain © Spitting Image Workshop

Thatcher Cutting Up Britain © Spitting Image Workshop

Kasia Kowalska writes:

The exhibition Spitting Image: From Start to Finish opens at the Cartoon Museum in London tomorrow (26 February) – 30 years to the day since the TV series burst into our living rooms and put satire back at the heart of British comedy.

The BFI is also joining in the celebrations with an anniversary event and a screening of the BBC Four Arena documentary Whatever Happened To Spitting Image? on Thursday. It will be broadcast in spring.

The anniversary has already prompted a debate on the current state of satire on TV, with the Spitting Image producer John Lloyd and the Private Eye editor Ian Hislop, a former writer for the show, putting forward opposing views

Booktrust has appointed a new online writer in residence, The Observer’s political cartoonist Chris Riddell, to write a weekly blog in the form of drawings. Meanwhile, The Beano’s, Barrie Appleby, lent a helping hand at a pre-school playgroup where he shared cartooning tips with children as part of the Annual National Storytelling Week.

Escaping the UK weather can be a funny business. The Cartoonists’ Club of Great Britain got together for its 3rd Mighty Malta Minicon last week and if you were not lucky enough to go, you can still find out what they got up to.

 

Doonesbury © Garry Trudeau

Doonesbury © Garry Trudeau

The syndicated Doonesbury comic strip is taking a long-term break from this week, the cartoonist Garry Trudeau has announced. Fans should not worry though, as older strips will be revisited.

Comic art continues to court controversy: the Angoulême International Comics Festival got into hot water over its sponsorship by SodaStream which is the target of an international boycott; a newspaper office in Baghdad suffered a bomb attack following the publication of a cartoon criticising Ayatollah Khamenei;  and the thought police are very much alive and well in Algeria, where the cartoonist Djamel Ghanem has been threatened with imprisonment for a cartoon that was not even published.

Across the border in Tunisia, there may be hope for the international campaign “100 drawings for Jabeur” to free Jabeur Mejri, who has been pardoned and offered asylum in Sweden. The blogger was sentenced to seven and a half years in prison for publishing cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed on Facebook in 2012.

Finally, we note with sadness that Gordon Bell, cartoonist for The Beano and the Dundee Courier, and Tony Harding, who drew football stories for Scorcher, Hotspur, and Action, both passed away recently.

The Round-up

March 16, 2012 in General, Links

Doonesbury, the syndicated satirical comic strip  by Garry Trudeau, has again become the subject of controversy in the US over a series of strips criticising proposed abortion legislation. Some papers have dropped this week’s strips, while others moved them from the comics pages to the op-ed section. The situation is neatly summarised in this video. Responses have generally been divided along expected partisan lines, with one left-leaning commentator describing the papers’ decision as “cowardly”. A more irreverent response can be found here. The strips themselves can be read at the official Doonesbury site.

The comics artist Moebius has died at the age of 73. The Guardian has a detailed obituary here. You can read a shorter tribute, accompanied by some fine examples of his work, over at Forbidden Planet.

A collection of 80 First World War cartoons by the German artist Albert Heim are set to be auctioned next month.

And finally, the Chennai-based cartoonist Biswajit Balasubramanian tells The Times of India about the challenges and effort involved in creating cartoons, and about the difficulty of selling cartoon art via the gallery system. Read it here.

Round-up: What the Bloghorn saw

September 16, 2011 in News

Rob Murray writes:

A diverse group of cartoonists and comic book artists have contributed self portraits to a new exhibition at Orbital Comics in Great Newport Street, London. The show is free to view and runs until October 15. A list of participating cartoonists can be found on Orbital’s events page.

The Chicago Tribune took the unusual step of pulling Garry Trudeau’s Doonesbury strip this week, on the basis that it did not meet the paper’s fairness policy. The strip referred to allegations purportedly contained in an as-yet unreleased book about the former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin. The Tribune responds to readers’ comments on its decision here.

Yet more evidence that watching too many animated cartoons can be bad for you, as a new study suggests that exposure to fast-paced cartoons such as SpongeBob Squarepants hinders abstract thinking, short-term memory and impulse control in young children. ABC News has more.

Meanwhile, Kellogg’s has defended its use of cartoon characters on its breakfast cereal packaging, after the Cancer Council claimed that cartoons on cereal boxes help promote unhealthy foods to children.

But wait, there’s some good news regarding kids and cartoons. It turns out, according to the Daily Telegraph, that Scooby-Doo is the healthiest cartoon. Zoinks!

Bloghorn is made on behalf of the UK Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation

Doonesbury hits 40

October 27, 2010 in News

The first ever Doonesbury, published 26th October 1970

American cartoonist Garry Trudeau has notched up 40 years of drawing his comic strip Doonesbury. The strip first appeared as ‘Bull Tales’ in his student newspaper at Yale University from where it was picked for syndication in the national press.

As its popularity grew, rights for its publication were sold overseas and it has been a popular and long-running feature in the Guardian newspaper in the UK as a result. We know this because of the howls of protest when it was dropped as a part of an ill-advised redesign during 2009. The paper backed down and the strip was hastily reinstated.

The 40th anniversary of the strip is being marked by the publication of Doonesbury 40: A Retrospective, and by celebration of all things Doonesbury-esque in the online magazine Slate, including an interview with Trudeau.

Cause and effect: Cartoonists’ Showcase

August 18, 2010 in Events, News

“Double Dip and Toil and Trouble !!” by Nick Hayes,
from the Guardian’s summer cartoonists showcase.

As previously mentioned in Bloghorn, the Guardian is showcasing six up-and-coming cartoonists whilst regular incumbent Steve Bell is on his summer holidays.

Since the last week of July, the cartoons of Anna Trench, Lou McKeever (aka Bluelou), Ben Jennings, Tanya Tier, Bob Moran and Nick Hayes have been adding their own visual takes on the day’s news. Their contributions haven’t been without controversy, with many cartoons receiving over 100 comments each, including numerous pieces or rebuttal from fellow Guardian cartoonist, Martin Rowson. As Martin says in the comments:

The reason for giving these cartoonists an airing here – including, of course, the opportunity to fail – is that these days it’s almost impossible to undergo that kind of baptism of fire in a national newspaper , and thus hone your native skills.

and on the subject of the comments:

[…] these six debutants have overturned an original editorial decision not to have comments on their work when it appears on this site. I think that’s quite brave of them, so it might be worthwhile some of you repaying the compliment by being constructive in your criticism, rather than just trolling about as usual, beating up this particular bus shelter on the side of the information superhighway with the kind of reckless abandon that seems to come so easily to the heroically anonymous.

On a related note, Steve Bell and Martin Rowson will be in conversation at the Edinburgh International Book Festival this weekend, whilst Steve will also be chatting to American political cartoonist Garry Trudeau and comic book writer Alan Moore.

Profile photo of Royston

by Royston

Cartoon Pick of the Week

November 14, 2008 in General


It’s a US Elections Comedown Special this week…

One: Garry Trudeau’s Doonesbury strip in The Guardian on withdrawal symptoms

Two: Gerald Scarfe in the Sunday Times on sweeping up

Three: Liza Donnelly in the New Yorker on the woe of winning

The PCO: British cartoon talent

Cartooning the US Presidential Election

November 4, 2008 in General

We’ve seen how they covered the recent Democratic and Republican Conventions, but as the USA goes to the polls today, how do cartoonists cover an election?

Probably the most controversial approach is that being taken by Garry Trudeau of Doonesbury (seen here in the Guardian) – to draw the artwork for Wednesday’s strip in advance and in essence ‘call the election‘, in this case for Obama – an approach not without it’s dangers, as dealt with here by Cincinnati.com‘s Jim Borgman.

Of course, in these days of blogging, it’s now possible for a cartoonist to live-blog their drawings, like Marshall Ramsey in the Mississippi Clarion Ledger or the Politicker.com‘s Rob Tornoe. The Daily Cartoonist‘s Alan Gardener will be live-blogging the live-bloggers as the results come in tonight as well.

The PCO: Great British cartoon talent

Cartoon review: Phill Jupitus on Radio 4

July 24, 2008 in General

Strip by comedian and wannabe cartoonist Phill Jupitus

PCOer Neil Dishington reviews Comic Love, Phill Jupitus’s BBC Radio Four show in praise of newspaper comic strips

Apparently Phill Jupitus is a thwarted cartoonist.

Aren’t we all?

I should admit that he is not my favourite comedian, and I am not a particular fan of comic strips, as opposed to stand-alone cartoon jokes.

Much of what Jupitus had to say in his Radio 4 show seemed like a repeat of what most cartoonists talk about when they get together: lack of markets and indifferent editors.

The interviewees in the show were able to speak from strength – Garry Trudeau (Doonesbury), Steve Bell (If), Peattie and Taylor (Alex). But I always think that artists like this have become part of the establishment they lampoon. Is it just as easy to get stuck into royalty, celebs and the City of London when you are selling strips in umpteen countries around the world and your stuff is syndicated all over the place?

I do think Steve Bell has kept his integrity, but I wonder how much attention people pay to “cartoonists with attitude”? We, as a nation, do seem happy to accept bland publishable stuff as the norm.

I did like some of the comments by the cartoonists interviewed by Jupitus, such as Steve Bell’s call for a “missionary zeal” in making cartoons which have something to say. In contrast, I was not so keen to hear that the future of cartoons will be online.

Overall, I found the programme bland, smug and much of it decidedly familiar. A real time-filler. It was lazy broadcasting and lazy journalism.

And lo and behold, in the Guardian newspaper of July 22, an article by Jupitus retelling the same stuff as the programme, accompanied by a cartoon strip drawn by … celebrity cartoonist Phill Jupitus.

Thanks for the review Neil. Bloghorn says click D for Dishington.

The BBCs Listen again facility is here – and the program will be online until Saturday 26th July.

Full-time British cartoon talent