You are browsing the archive for live cartooning.

Profile photo of Royston

by Royston

Herne Bay Cartoon Festival 2017:
The End of the Pier Show

August 10, 2017 in Events, General, News

The Herne Bay Cartoon Festival main event was held on the Pier for the first time on Sunday, after four years at the Bandstand. It proved a perfect fit for a live cartooning event. The sun shone and a good time was had by all.

Photos © Kasia Kowalska unless otherwise stated

The cartoonists' parade

The cartoonists’ parade their way on to the Pier with HBCF pencils, led by
Rob Murray, Chris Burke, Martin Rowson and Dave Brown

Cartoonists' group pic

The town crier announces the event as many of the cartoonists assemble

The cartoonists who took part were: Nathan Ariss, Jeremy Banx, Rupert Besley, Andrew Birch, Dave Brown, Des Buckley, Chris Burke, Pete Dredge, Noel Ford, Clive Goddard, Alex Hughes, Glenn Marshall, Rob Murray, Roger Penwill, Helen Pointer, Royston Robertson, Martin Rowson, Tim Ruscoe, Tim Sanders, Rich Skipworth, The Surreal McCoy, Steve Way and Chris Williams.

Chris Burke draws a seaside peep board

Where to begin? Chris Burke makes a start on creating a seaside peep board

Chris Burke's finished board

Chris Burke’s finished board is peerless. Photo © Richard Baxter

Martin Rowson and Andrew Birch

A day of contrasts: Martin Rowson with Andrew Birch

Martin Rowson draws

Martin Rowson’s Jeremy Corbyn cartoon drew a few disapproving glances but the kids loved it. Photos © Jason Hollingsworth

Click here for our blog post on Martin Rowson’s talk at the festival.

Caricaturists in action

The caricaturists — Helen Pointer, Alex Hughes and Pete Dredge — were kept constantly busy. Photo © Jason Hollingsworth

Family caricatured

Happy customers with caricatures by the three artists. Photo © Kerry Riley

Glenn Marshall's Punch and Judy v The Zombies

Glenn Marshall created a cartoon Punch and Judy show with a modern twist. That, as they say, is the way to do it

Public drawing board

As ever, the public were given a chance to draw, overseen by cartoonist the Surreal McCoy. Photo © Kerry Riley

Royston Robertson's Brexit board

Royston Robertson did board entirely filled with Brexit cartoons

Andrew Birch draws

Andrew Birch draws a seaside-themed board

Fake cartoons

Many of the cartoonists contributed to the Fake Cartoons shared board, mostly gags about Donald Trump. SAD! Photo © Richard Baxter

Rob Murray's The Scream big board

In the frame: Rob Murray poses with his board based on The Scream, with an info panel from “Tat Modern”. Photo © Richard Baxter

Dave Brown with big board

No Herne Bay Cartoon Festival would be complete without big board cartoon from The Independent’s Dave Brown

Cartoonists on the merry go round

To end the day, the cartoonists went on the merry-go-round. Pictured are
Noel Ford, who made his Herne Bay debut, Chris Williams and Alex Hughes. Photo © Karol Steele

Caricaturist Helen Pointer

The caricaturist Helen Pointer also appeared at Herne Bay for the first time. Photo © Jason Hollingsworth

That’s all, folks. You can see more by visiting @HBCartoonFest on Twitter or Facebook.com/ HBCartoonFest.

Herne Bay Cartoon Festival is sponsored by the Professional Cartoonists Organisation and supported using public funding by Arts Council England.

Profile photo of Royston

by Royston

Herne Bay Cartoon Festival approaches

July 1, 2015 in Events, General, News

Herne Bay Cartoon Festival poster by Jeremy Banx

With the scorching hot weather we’re having, it’s a good time to think about planning a trip to the seaside. And Herne Bay in Kent is just the place to go.

The third Herne Bay Cartoon Festival begins later this month with an exhibition called Lines in the Sand opening at the Beach Creative gallery on 28 July. As you can see from the excellent poster above, by Procartoonists.org member Jeremy Banx, there will also be a live cartooning day in the Bandstand on the sea front once again, with big board cartoons, caricatures, and a few surprises. That takes place on Sunday 2 August.

This year there will also be an exhibition of cartoons from the British Cartoon Archive, on the history of cartoons and people taking offence at them, as well as a show in tribute to the late Martin Honeysett, who exhibited and appeared at the first two Herne Bay cartoon events.

This year’s event builds on the success of the first one, when it was part of a Marcel Duchamp celebration, and last year’s standalone Cartoonists Beside the Surrealside. It sponsored by the PCO and supported using public funding by Arts Council England.

We’ll have more on the festival nearer the time. Meanwhile, you can seen lots more PCO coverage of the previous two events, including great videos by David Good, in the Herne Bay archive.

Clive’s gig is a walk in the park

September 11, 2013 in Events, News

© Clive Goddard draws for Radio 2 at Hyde Park @ Procartoonists.org

© Clive Goddard draws for Radio 2 at Hyde Park @ Procartoonists.org

Procartoonists.org member Clive Goddard tells us about a star-studded event

I’ve been drawing a regular cartoon for the website of Radio 2’s Alex Lester for four years now, a connection that meant I got asked along to the BBC station’s Hyde Park gig on Sunday.

The brief was to draw live caricatures of all the artists appearing – around 30 people – as well as the radio presenters who were taking part, in one large image.

As I’m not a natural “on-the-spot” caricaturist, I took the precaution of preparing roughs before the event, then inking them up on the day, but leaving out the hairstyles just in case something radical had happened to them (i.e. Jessie J).

They provided me with a space in the production area, which turned out to be a pair of teepees and far more palatial than the damp Portakabin I’d been expecting. As well as housing the console that Terry Wogan, Jo Whiley and Ken Bruce etc sat behind to do their shows, there was a comfy sofa for celeb interviews, a bar, table football, smoke machine, mirrorball – not a dump in the slightest.

Assorted famous faces drifted in and out during the day, occasionally commenting on their likenesses or perceived lack thereof.

Simon Mayo looks for a chance to say "Hello to Jason Isaacs" @ Procartoonists.org

Simon Mayo wonders if Clive Goddard's drawing features a chance to say "Hello to Jason Isaacs" @ Procartoonists.org

At some points it was all a bit overwhelming: Johnny Walker sitting on my stool so I could get his hair right; the singers Jack Johnson and Josh Groban and Radio 2’s legendary Sally Traffic stopping for a chat; and Elaine Paige saying I’d made her boss-eyed (I had).

Whispering Bob Harris turned up unexpectedly and had to be pencilled in in the corner – while the Manic Street Preachers played an acoustic set behind me. It was enough to keep me in name-dropping anecdotes for years to come.

The Ed adds: Thanks, Clive. Keep an eye out for Clive’s cartoon as it may be auctioned for this autumn’s Children in Need.

Shropshire Live talks Shrewsbury

April 3, 2013 in Events, News

Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival by Wilbur Dawbarn

Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival © Wilbur Dawbarn @ Procartoonists.org

The website Shropshirelive.com has a detailed preview of the 10th Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival, which takes place this month (19-21 April).

The piece gives another outing to this fine cartoon of The Square in Shrewsbury during the cartoon festival by Procartoonists.org member Wilbur Dawbarn, which originally appeared in The Oldie magazine.

Shrewsbury: Now we are ten

February 27, 2013 in General

Shrewsbury International Cartoon Festival

Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival @ Procartoonists.org

This year’s Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival is the tenth one. Appropriately, in this significant year, the theme will be “Time”.

The exhibitions start just under a month from now, on 22 March, and the main weekend of events is 19-21 April. But before it all gets going, we thought we’d mark the occasion with a brief look back at Shrewsburys past, to give you a flavour of the event.

Shrewsbury scenes

Caricaturists, live drawing, workshops and exhibitions at Shrewsbury 2012 @Procartoonists.org

Here is a video from the festival made by Procartoonists members in 2010 (when this site was called the Bloghorn).

So if you haven’t been to the festival before, come along and tell us what you think …

The Melodrawma at Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival

The Shrewsbury "Melodrawma" @ Procartoonists.org

Entente cordiale at St Just festival

October 22, 2012 in Events, News

The Surreal McCoy reports on the recent St Just Cartoon Festival

Spotlights on the Brits exhibition

Nathan Ariss salutes the Spotlights on the Brits exhibition, and an Olympics cartoon from the show by © Roger Penwill @ Procartoonists.org

Entente cordiale. Sounds like something you find on the shelf alongside the bottles of elderflower and blackcurrant flavours right? Wrong.

Actually, the final weekend of the St Just Cartoon Festival, near Limoges in France, was full of such friendly understanding, with 100-plus cartoonists and caricaturists mingling with each other and the general public with great bonhomie.

I was attending as the European liaison officer for Procartoonists.org, along with chairman Nathan Ariss, to represent UK cartoonists, most of them members of our organisation, whose work was being exhibited as Spotlights on the Brits.

The St Just committee had asked for cartoons on the themes of the Queen’s Jubilee and the London Olympics. Our members duly responded with a wide variety of caricatures and cartoons that were prominently displayed in the purpose-built exhibition hall.

Billeted with local familes for the weekend, we were treated with great hospitality. Food and drink was plentiful, long tables were the order of the day. There was much to see on the walls, from the Cartooning For Peace display on elections around the world to the extraordinary rat paintings.

Manu at work

The cartoonist Manu draws for the crowds at St Just @ Procartoonists.org

Cartoonists set up shop with their books and comics for sale on the big round tables. Visitors were caricatured and cartooned, business cards exchanged, contacts made.

The American editorial cartoonists Daryl Cagle (Cagle Post Syndication) and Eric Allie gave a presentation on the state of political cartooning in the US.

On the Saturday afternoon, a brown carpet was rolled out and more mystifying visitor arrived. The area is famous for its Limousin cows so the festival was being honoured with a visit from one of them. It was not, as we had initially thought, the French penchant for a Surrealist installation.

The St Just cow

The St Just cow. Not a Surrealist installation @ Procartoonists.org

The cow also doubled up as a prize for cartooning achievement – this year it went to the French cartoonist Aurel. (Apparently it’s the same cow every year, which would explain why she was completely unfazed by the paparazzi’s flash bulbs.)

Sunday morning saw a large assembly of cartoonists crammed into the local priest’s drawing room for the traditional drinks party he hosts each year. We all spilled out into the courtyard in front of the 12th century church in a pastis-induced blur of congeniality before boarding the special cartoonists’ carriage of the Paris train.

A little knowledge of French can get you a long way, mais oui!

When cartoonists meet The Public

May 1, 2012 in Events, General

Bill Stott at Big Board

Bill Stott gives us his "meeting The Public" look

Bill Stott, who will be writing regularly for the Procartoonists.org blog, gives us his take on the Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival:

Shrewsbury is an opportunity to meet that most unpredictable of creatures: The Public. At Shrewsbury at least, they take cartooning in their stride. I was inking my 8ft by 5ft Big Board, when a couple (“We’ve come all the way from Wolverhampton for this.”) sidled up to watch.

He said, “It’s quite good, that.” Then she said, “’Course, I expect you get all your drawings off the internet.” She was wearing a plastic rain hood so I forgave her.

Later, whilst drawing fast black-and-white cartoons for Noel Ford’s instant gallery in the market, I was slightly disheartened by the number of people who weren’t taking any notice.

Suddenly, and at close hand, a male voice shouted, “Irene, they’re over here!” Good, thought I. Fans. Then there was another much louder shout. “IRENE! IRENE! THE TOILETS! THEY’RE OVER HERE!” He was right. They were.

Mr and Mrs Deafbladder bustled through. Much, much later he may have been puzzled by the black felt-tip pen stroke across the back of his mac.

Bill Stott will be back next week with more musing on the life of the professional cartoonist.

This will be our final post on Shrewsbury 2012, so we’ll finish with a round-up of links to personal blogs written by festival attendees this year: Alex Lester, the Radio 2 presenter and patron of the festival, wrote not one, but two blogs; and posts have also been written by the Procartoonists.org members Huw Aaron, Tim Harries, Rob Murray and Royston Robertson.

Photo by Nicolette Petersen

Profile photo of Royston

by Royston

Cartoonists idle away the evening

March 10, 2011 in News

Jonathan PughTwo top cartoonists are to give a talk on their art at a new venue set up in London by the Idler magazine.

Jonathan Pugh, pictured, and Tony Husband will host an event called Secrets of the Master Cartoonists at The Idler Academy on March 31 at 7pm.

After many years at The Times, Pugh is now the Daily Mail’s chief cartoonist, and Tony Husband contributes to The Times, Private Eye and many magazines. At this one-off event they will take questions from the audience, as well as drawing cartoons live.

Tony, a contributor to The Idler, was asked to do a talk and demonstration by the magazine’s editor Tom Hodgkinson. Tony told the Bloghorn:

“I thought it would be good to do it with a Jonathan Pugh, a cartoonist and friend whose work I admire. I’m not sure how it will go or where it will end up but it should be fun.

“The Academy is a great idea, a place where you can go to read, learn, listen and talk, drink coffee and meet like minded folks. Perhaps a new movement may start there, who knows, its a fascinating experiment and well worth supporting.”

The Idler Academy is a bookshop, café and “centre of learning” in West London. Founded by Hodgkinson and his wife, Victoria Hull, the intention is to bring back old-school teaching subjects and styles in the relaxed manner for which the magazine is known.

Their website says: “We want to combine the atmosphere of cultivated leisure that distinguished Plato’s Academy with the lively conviviality of the 18th century coffeehouse, and add a good dose of the 1950s grammar school.”

For more information on this and other events, visit the Idler Academy website. Tickets for the cartoon talk are £18.

Profile photo of Royston

by Royston

Performance cartooning in New York

December 6, 2010 in Comment

Live performance cartooning
We have told you many times about the Battle of the Cartoonists, part of the Big Draw and have reported on performance cartooning at the Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival.

Now, news reaches us of a performance event in New York, above, featuring three teams of cartoonists from The New Yorker coming up with improvised drawings based on a selection of words.

The New York Observer has the story: Battle of the Sharpies: Cartoonists square off with their pens. The author of the piece, Alice Gregory, explains the appeal of this kind of live cartooning event:

There’s nothing more impressive than good improv. To see spontaneous wit at work may be the most humbling form of entertainment. What, no Google to confirm spelling? No coffee to spur that sparkle? On-the-spot illustration is fun to witness.

The voting system sounds familiar to any cartoonist who has taken part in the Big Draw’s Battle of the Cartoonists:

In lieu of a scientific system—tallied points, say—the victors were determined by subjective shouts. The decibel levels were ambiguous, but an executive decision was made for the sake of efficiency.

We feel the losers’ pain! But, it’s all just for fun, of course, and the greater goal is achieved: reminding people how much fun cartoons can be.

Thanks to The Surreal McCoy for the link.

Footnote: The Big Draw 2011 is looking for help with funding.
Go here: The Big Give

Cartoons and poetry meet on stage

September 9, 2008 in General

PCOer Clive Goddard on a unique cartooning event

It’s not every day you hear of a comedy double-act show featuring a poet and a cartoonist. I recently got a ticket for such an event at the Cornerstone Theatre, Didcot.

The cartoonist in question was Tony Husband, whose work I’ve admired for years, and the poet was TV and radio’s Ian McMillan, (“the Shirley Bassey of performance poetry”) best known for appearances on the likes of Have I Got News For You.

The pair have been touring their show around large chunks of the country for several years now. It was billed as “A Cartoon History of Here” which intrigued me as I imagined these two Lancashire blokes would know very little about Didcot, an Oxfordshire dormitory town with a railway station, a power station and not much else. As it turned out, they did know very little about Didcot – that’s where the audience came in.

Right from the off Ian McMillan was very funny. He did an excellent job of making everyone feel very relaxed, which was just as well considering the audience participation which was to follow. We had to wait a while for Tony’s contribution. For the first half hour or so he sat anonymously behind a desk at the back, like the Pet Shop Boys’ keyboard player.

The idea, it emerged, was for Ian to elicit ideas (preferably silly ones) about the town from the audience, which were turned into an improvised communal poem, acted out by lucky volunteers and illustrated by Tony’s cartoons.

Tony drew on sheets of acetate directly onto an overhead projector so we got to see how fast he drew – and thought (both of which were pretty damn fast). The style was relaxed, confident and instantly recognisable, which is what you’d expect of someone who has been Cartoonist of the Year several times.

At the end of the evening Tony gave away his drawings to an appreciative group of clamouring young fans, which meant I didn’t get one.

All in all, a great idea and great fun. As was the remainder of the evening in the pub where we fearlessly grilled the pair on their intimate lives and learned nothing. Well, nothing printable.

Thanks, Clive. Bloghorn says click G for Goddard.

The PCO: British cartoon talent