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The Round-up

July 1, 2014 in Events, General, Links, News

Kate Charlesworth. Photo by Kasia Kowalska

Kate Charlesworth. Photo by Kasia Kowalska

Kasia Kowalska writes:

Twelve cartoonists have been commissioned to create artwork about the First World War to accompany the BBC Radio 4 series 1914 Day by Day, in a collaboration between 14-18 NOW and the Cartoon Museum.

Margaret MacMillan, author of The War That Ended Peace, follows the events that led to the conflict in a daily broadcast at 4.55pm. The Procartoonists.org members Kate Charlesworth, above, with her artwork at the museum, Steve Bell and Ralph Steadman are involved in the project.

Quentin Blake tells Simon Schama that he is “not frightened by the word museum” in an interview for the FT about his inaugural exhibition at the new House of Illustration, in King’s Cross, London. The exhibition, called Inside Stories, runs from 2 July to 2 November and includes illustrations for children’s books as well as artwork for Candide by Voltaire. UPDATE: The BBC News website has a new feature on the House of Illustration.

From the Satirical City exhibition by Martin Rowson

From the Satirical City exhibition by Martin Rowson (click to enlarge)

PCO member Martin Rowson has an exhibition of London-themed cartoons called Satirical City at the Building Centre until 12 July. The exhibition marks the 15th anniversary of London Communications Agency and displays close to 120 cartoons, drawn over the past 15 years, and a new mural. The cartoonist talks to BBC London News about the exhibition here, and writes about it here.

Andy Murray kicked off Wimbledon by becoming a guest editor of The Beano. “This might be my greatest title yet,” he told The Guardian.

What connects Finding NemoBambi and countless other cartoons? The writer Sarah Boxer (In the Floyd Archives) asks Why are all the cartoon mothers dead? in an article published by The Atlantic.

Moose Kids Comics launched online

Moose Kids Comics is available as PDF for free

The new kids’ publication Moose Kids Comics, above, brainchild of the cartoonist Jamie Smarthas launched for free online but is on the look out for a publisher.

The BBC has a report on the elaborate appeal of William Heath Robinson. The building of a museum to house his work begins in the autumn.

Following the exodus of Spain’s top cartoonists from the satirical magazine El Jueves last month (we covered that here), a rival digital version has appeared online titled Orgullo y Satisfacción (Pride and Satisfaction). It has had 30,000 downloads since its launch a few weeks ago. The digital magazine will become a regular monthly publication from September.

The 31st Aydın Doğan International Cartoon Competition in Turkey announced its winners, with the top prize going to the Turkish cartoonist, Kürşat Zaman. More than 800 cartoonists from 70 countries took part and the panel of judges was led by the cartoonist Liza Donnelly, of The New Yorker, and included the Cartoon Museum curator Anita O’Brien.

The US cartoonist Etta Hulme has died. She was twice named best editorial cartoonist by the National Cartoonist Society and was the subject of the documentary Trailblazer: The Editorial Cartoons of Etta Hulme. And one of the most distinguished US sports cartoonists, Amadee Wohlschlaeger, has died, aged 102.

© Charles Barsotti/The New Yorker

© Charles Barsotti/The New Yorker

Finally, we remember the New Yorker cartoonist Charles Barsotti, who died on 16 June. He is fondly remembered by the magazine’s cartoon editor Bob Mankoff. And there is a selection of Barsotti cartoons on his favourite theme here.

The Round-up

March 3, 2014 in Events, General, Links, News

Handsworth Creative cartoon by Hunt Emerson

© Hunt Emerson/Handsworth Creative cic

Kasia Kowalska writes:

Hunt Emerson, the comics artist and Procartoonists.org member, is helping launch a new project called Handsworth Creative cic.

The “cic” stands for community interest company. The not-for-profit venture is part Lottery-funded and aims to develop creative local history projects by and for the residents of Handsworth, Birmingham. Appropriately, the first product will be a comic, with input from young, aspiring cartoonists, charting the history of the area.

Cartoonists often share work on social networks these days, but Dacs and Own-It emphasise that it’s important to read the small print and have collaborated on an article: Social media: understanding the terms and conditions

What would become of us if we could not grumble? Two familiar PCO names, Andy Davey and Bill Stott, have adopted alter egos in order to let off steam in a new venture titled Men of Letters. There are some rather good cartoons there too, of course.

Bash Street sign

Bash Street becomes reality © The Beano

To celebrate the 60th anniversary of The Bash Street Kids, Dundee has named a street after the notorious Beano characters and has unveiled a unique illustrated sign, above. The Courier has a video of the event.

A different kind of street art can be seen in Newcastle, where a graffiti artist has made a stand against Russia’s “gay propaganda” laws. Meanwhile, Russia has become a focal point for cartoonists in the wake of the crisis in Ukraine, both in Russia and abroad.

A cartoonist in Germany has been accused of anti-Semitism, for depicting Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook as a hook-nosed octopus, after the company acquired WhatsApp. Burkhard Mohr apologised for any offence caused, which he said was unintentional, and provided an alternative cartoon.

Procartoonists.org member Jonathan Pugh is among the nominees for Cartoonist of the Year award at the Press Awards 2013. Other nominees include Peter Brookes, Ingram Pinn, Matt, Chris Riddell and Gerald Scarfe.

In the US, the National Cartoonists Society has published nominations for the 2013 Reuben Award for Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year. Bob Mankoff of The New Yorker has more on the difference/overlap between Twitter wisecracks and cartoon captions. Ed Koren, the recently appointed Cartoonist Laureate for Vermont has got stuck in to his new role.

And the award for immortalising the Oscars in cartoon form … goes to Liza Donnelly.

The Round-up

December 2, 2013 in General, Links, News

© Liza Donnelly @Procartoonists.org

Liza Donnelly, cartoonist for The New Yorker, shares with Forbes.com the transcript of a recent speech in which she looks at how cartoonists can use humour as a force for peace.

Huw Aaron, a member of Procartoonists.org, shares some strips from his ongoing North Stand series and asks, ‘Who’d be a rugby fan?’

Patrick Blower, whose editorial cartoons can regularly be seen in the Daily Telegraph, has been spotted drawing live to illustrate BBC political editor Nick Robinson‘s report on the energy industry. Watch the video, embedded in a related blog post by Robinson, here.

Still with the BBC, a report on how comic strips are helping doctors improve their bedside manner. Meanwhile, over at The Guardian, psychologist Neil Cohn attempts to analyse the sophisticated language of cartoons.

And finally, “visual journalist” (or straightforward “comics artist”?) Joe Sacco talks to Salon about his work and how the graphic novel makes it possible to deal with difficult subjects. Read the interview here.

Human rights in cartoon form

September 16, 2013 in News

Know Your Rights. Cartoon © Ali Ferzat @ Procartoonists.org

Amnesty's Know your Rights booklet. Cover cartoon © Ali Ferzat @ Procartoonists.org

Amnesty International has come up with a memorable way to remind people about the Universal Declaration of Human Rights: it has issued the document as a booklet illustrated with cartoons.

Know your Rights is published in conjuction with Waterstones and features 14 cartoonists, including the Procartoonists.org members Tony Husband, Fran Orford and Royston Robertson, illustrating various articles of the Declaration.

© cartoon Tony Husband

Article 4. No one shall be held in slavery or servitude © Tony Husband @ Procartoonists.org

The booklet features an introduction by the writer A.L. Kennedy and includes thoughts on human rights from the cartoonists themselves. Michael Heath accompanies his cartoon with a succint thought: “It’s nice to be able to draw anything you want without being arrested.”

The cover is by the Syrian cartoonist Ali Ferzat who was beaten up because he drew cartoons critical of the Assad regime.

Publication marks the fact that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was ratified 60 years ago this month. The booklet contains the full text of the Declaration.

© Royston Robertson cartoon

Article 27. Everyone has the right freely to participate in the cultural life of the community © Royston Robertson @ Procartoonists.org

The other cartoonists in the booklet are: Steven Appleby, Liza Donnelly, Merrily Harpur, Neil Kerber, Martha Richler (Marf), Chris Riddell, Gerald Scarfe, David Shrigley [Does this mean he’s officially a cartoonist now? – Ed] and Judith Vanistendael.

Know your Rights can be found by the tills in branches of Waterstones nationwide, priced £2.

The Round-up

June 1, 2013 in Events, General, Links, News

© The Surreal McCoy @Procartoonists.org

New Yorker cartoonist Liza Donnelly has curated an exhibition of work by international cartoonists on the subject of women’s rights – including the cartoon above by one of our members, The Surreal McCoy. Donnelly explains the project here.

Speaking at this year’s Hay Festival, Sir Quentin Blake has said that illustrations are vital in getting young children onto the path of reading for enjoyment. Read his argument here.

In July, Brighton will play host to an unusual conference that spans both comics and healthcare. downthetubes has more.

Across two blog posts, New Yorker cartoon editor Bob Mankoff publishes imaginary inventions, as devised by his cartoonists. Explore them in Part 1 and Part 2.

Finally, comics expert Paul Gravett reports on Sequential, a new app for the iPad that is making graphic novels accessible in digital format – including, in the first round of releases, the recently-launched compendium of work by Procartoonists.org member Hunt Emerson. Read Gravett’s article for more information.

The Round-up

May 25, 2012 in General, Links, News

 

© Dave Walker

Dave Walker, regular cartoonist for The Church Times and a member of the Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation, has been interviewed about his work by Christian.co.uk. You can read it here.

Kevin ‘KAL‘ Kallaugher, editorial cartoonist for The Economist, proves that a single cartoon can change politics.

Elsewhere, politics is changing cartooning, with the fall of the Ben Ali regime in Tunisia having done away with the censorship that was preventing political cartoons flourishing.

Meanwhile, four Iranian cartoonists – Firoozeh Mozafarri, Kianoush Ramenzani, Hassan Karimzadeh and Mana Neyewstani – have received this year’s Cartooning for Peace award. One of the judges, New Yorker cartoonist Liza Donnelly, writes about what she saw in their work.

Finally, Forbidden Planet looks at the trend for reviews in comic form.

Profile photo of Royston

by Royston

A Monday Round-up

April 16, 2012 in News

"Is there any news of the Iceberg?" © Bill Tidy

You may have noticed a lack of blog posts last week, this was caused by various changes going on behind the scenes to this website. To make it up to you, we offer an early round-up of cartooning links this week, as later we’ll be concentrating on this week’s Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival (April 19-22).

First up, you may have noticed that it’s 100 years since a certain large boat sank, and if you’ve not had enough of the excessive media coverage, here’s Bob Mankoff of the New Yorker on The world’s largest comedy cliche. We also revisit the definitive cartoon on the subject, above, originally in Punch in 1968, by the Procartoonists.org patron Bill Tidy.

Still on matters New Yorker, Liza Donnelly has transcribed one of her talks so you can read it on her blog: Word and image: The art of cartooning. And Carolita Johnson outlines her somewhat unusual career trajectory for the women’s website The Hairpin inHow to become a cartoonist in about 20 jobs.

Robert Crumb continues to be lauded by the art establishment in France, where he lives, and talks to AP about how odd he still finds it to see his art on walls in galleries. And talking of Art with a capital A, Charles Saatchi has his eye on a cartoonist.

Here’s something of which we were aware, from the AOI’s magazine, Varoom, but we hadn’t realised was now online. It’s a great read too. Martin Colyer, design director at Reader’s Digest, talks to cartoonists John CuneoSteve Way and Tom Gauld aboutThe process of cartoons.

Mark “Andertoons” Anderson does a bit of soul-searching on his blog and tells us Why I’m a cartoonist.

The popular DC Thomson comic strip The Numskulls is 50 years old, so comics artist Lew Stringer looks at how this story of little people in our heads fascinates and considers its many imitators, in Variations on a small theme.

The little people in my head tell me that’s enough links to be going on with. Expect Shrewsburyness tomorrow.

Profile photo of Royston

by Royston

How one woman was saved by cartoons

February 1, 2011 in Comment

Here’s a great video from the New Yorker cartoonist Liza Donnelly that shows how cartoons can make serious points and provide hearty laughs at the same time.

In an illustrated lecture for Technology, Entertainment and Design (TED), a non-profit organisation dedicated to “Ideas worth spreading”, which it makes available through talks posted on its website, Donnelly talks about how she found her identity as a woman using the medium of cartoons, while growing up in turbulent times.

Liza Donnelly cartoon
“I can’t decide what I’m going to be when I grow up — a good girl or a slut.”

You can read more here: Cartooning has been my saviour.

“I have lived the privileged life of an American, but nonetheless have felt great difficulty in figuring out who I am and why I am here. It may sound funny, but cartooning has been my saviour. And I believe that the art form is unique in its ability to open people’s eyes – and not just those of us who practise it.”

Donnelly certainly seems to have succeeded making people laugh as well as opening their eyes, check out the video for the response to her Sarah Palin cartoon, in particular.

Profile photo of Royston

by Royston

Cartoon Pick of the Week

November 14, 2008 in General


It’s a US Elections Comedown Special this week…

One: Garry Trudeau’s Doonesbury strip in The Guardian on withdrawal symptoms

Two: Gerald Scarfe in the Sunday Times on sweeping up

Three: Liza Donnelly in the New Yorker on the woe of winning

The PCO: British cartoon talent