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The Round-up

October 28, 2012 in General, Links, News

MAD Magazine Alfred Champagne 300x411 Happy 56th Birthday, Alfred E. Neuman!

MAD's Alfred E. Neuman @Procartoonists.org

Fastcocreate.com looks back at the 60-year history of MAD, the subversive comic magazine, in this in-depth article and slideshow. For even more on the subject, MAD’s editors have put together an exhaustive new book.

In a short video, BBC News talks to the US cartoonists Pat Bagley and Nick Anderson about lampooning Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. Watch it here.

Martin Rowson draws our attention to the announcement that a former Daily Mirror showbiz reporter, 93-year-old Donald Zec, has won The Oldie’s first art award. See Donald’s winning portrait, and the other shortlisted pictures, here.

Is it a bird? A plane? Or yet more evidence of the decline of the newspaper industry? Clark Kent has quit his job at the Daily Planet (thanks to Pete Dredge for spotting the report).

The Round-up

June 10, 2012 in General, Links, News

The Huffington Post looks as the wartime work of Dr Seuss, best known for his children’s books but also a prolific political cartoonist. Find the article and a slideshow here. The entire archive of Dr Seuss’ Second World War cartoons is available here.

To coincide with his appearance at the Hay Festival, Matt Pritchett, the pocket cartoonist for The Telegraph, is interviewed for the paper about his creative process and what got him started. Read the piece here.

After Indian politicians recently called for unflattering cartoons to be removed from school textbooks, The Indian Express looks back at the history of political cartooning in Indian newspapers, and suggests that the art form has been edged out there too.

Finally, with Mad magazine turning 60 this year, j.weekly.com looks back on its history and considers its roots in Jewish humour.

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by Royston

Apple U-turn on cartoonist's iPhone app

November 16, 2009 in News

bobble_reps_approved
Since we reported last Wedneday (November 11) that Apple rejected an iPhone application by MAD magazine cartoonist Tom Richmond, which featured caricatures of members of the US Congress, it seems the company has done a U-turn and approved it.

Apple had claimed that the app “contains content that ridicules public figures” and is in violation of “the iPhone Developer Program License Agreement”. That is no longer the case and it appears that the online reaction to the news may have played a part in getting the decision overturned.

Ray Griggs, who produced and financed the app, called Bobble Reps, said: “I would like thank all of the websites, news stations, Twitter, Facebook, internet bloggers, and email sources that showed their support.”

Daryl Cagle’s Political Cartoonists Index has the full story.

Apple get the pip over iPhone caricatures

November 11, 2009 in Comment

Screenshot-2009.10.26-11.22.57MAD Magazine caricaturist Tom Richmond reports on his blog how technology firm Apple has refused to allow an iPhone application featuring caricatures of the US Congress to be sold through its iTunes store.

Richmond’s application or App, which is called called Bobble Rep, allows users to find the names and contact details for any of the 540 US congressmen and women currently in office. It was rejected on the grounds that it “contains content that ridicules public figures and is in violation of Section 3.3.14 from the iPhone Developer Program License Agreement.”

All iPhone applications have to be approved by Apple before they can be sold and installed on individual iPhones or iPod Touch. This decision may set a precedent for other cartoonists keen on moving into the lucrative iPhone app market.

Since posting about this on Monday, Richmond’s story has been picked up by columnists for CNN, the New York Times and MacWorld. US cartoon agency Cagle.com has also revealed it has a product in development with Apple.

What the digital cartoonist does

December 1, 2008 in General

US caricaturist Tom Richmond demonstrates on his blog how he digitally colours his illustrations for Mad magazine:

The PCO: Great British cartoon talent