You are browsing the archive for professional cartoonists.

Draw The Line Here cartoon book launch in London

July 9, 2015 in General, News

Draw The Line Here Cartoon Book for Charlie Hebdo Cartoonists

DRAW THE LINE HERE, the cartoon book produced by the Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation with English Pen and Crowdshed, was officially launched last night at an event hosted by Crowdshed in London.

Crowdshed owner Henry Freeman at the Draw The Line Here cartoon book launch

Photo by Mika Schick

The proceedings were kicked off by Crowdshed owner Henry Freeman who welcomed everyone to the event which has been the culmination of more than six months activity ever since the tragic events in Paris back in January.

Libby Purves speaks at Draw The Line Here cartoon book launch

Photo by Mika Schick

Foreword writer and PCO patron, the journalist, broadcaster and novelist Libby Purves spoke to an impressively large audience in the comfortably appointed performance space above the Crowdshed offices.

PCO Chairman Bill Stott speaks at the Draw The Line Here cartoon book launch

Photo by Mika Schick

Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation Chairperson Bill Stott gave an impassioned speech about the role of cartooning and satire in upholding the human right of freedom of speech.

Independent Cartoonist Dave Brown addresses the crowds at the Draw The Line Here cartoon book launch

Photo by Mika Schick

The Independent Newspaper cartoonist Dave Brown backed this up from his own perspective as a leading daily poilitical cartoonist well-used to sticking his neck out in the interests of Satire, Truth and the Cartoonist’s Way.

Robert Sharp of English Pen at Draw The Line Here cartoon book launch

English Pen organiser Robert Sharp also spoke about Draw The Line Here’s contribution to their ongoing global campaigns for freedom of speech.

Audience at Draw The Line Here Cartoon Book Launch

Photo by Mika Schick

There was an impressively large audience of enthusiasts, supporters and cartoonists and the event was well covered in social media.

Draw The Line Here cartoon Book Launch Tweets

 

 

 

BUY DRAW THE LINE HERE –  HERE (amazon) >>> or HERE (English Pen)>>> All funds go to help the families of Charlie Hebdo victims and to English Pen’s campaigns for freedom of speech. Not only that, but it’s also a fantastic collection of cartoons given completely freely by some of the UK’s best cartoonists in response to a terrible historic event.

 

 

 

 

Cartoon News – Round Up – links

July 1, 2015 in News

 

CARTOON NEWS ROUND UP:

Women in Cartooning – a talk by Ann Telnaes at Moses Znaimer’s IdeaCity Conference in Toronto earlier this month.

Ann Telnaes

 

RONALD SEARLE – a tribute site covers lesser-known facets of his life complete with wonderful illustrations

American politician “jokes” about wanting to shoot a cartoonist…

ASSOCIATED PRESS

Astonishing case of Cartoon Plagiarism. American cartoonist Bob Englehart reveals how his flags cartoon was brazenly ripped off.

Scotland’s comic book festival is now on in Glasgow:

Charlie Hebdo cartoon book Draw The Line Here published

June 8, 2015 in News

Draw The Line Here Cartoon Book for Charlie Hebdo Cartoonists

AFTER A LONG and checkered production process, the book of cartoons for the families of those who died in the Charlie Hebdo atrocity and in support of free speech, Draw The Line Here, has finally hit the bookshelves. All the crowdfunding pledgers were posted their copies last week and the historic collection of cartoons has been available on Amazon for a few weeks already.

The idea arose when English Pen, under the project management of Robert Sharp, approached crowdfunding organisation Crowdshed to find out if it would be possible to produce a book of cartoons by professional cartoonists in direct response to the Paris atrocity which occurred in January.

Cartoons inside Draw The Line Here by professional cartoonists

 

Draw The Line Here, available to buy HERE and, on Amazon HERE is a collection of more than 100 cartoons with a foreword by Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation patron Libby Purves. Profits from the sale of tyhe book will be split between a fund for the families of the victis of the atrocity and English Pen’s Writers At Risk Programme defending freedom of expression around the world.

Containing cartoons by professional cartoonists including the very well-known Steve Bell, Peter Brookes, Kevin Kallaugher, Martin Rowson and Ralph Steadman, this collection is a historic, albeit sad, essential volume for every cartoon collector.

 

Cartoonist Terry Anderson – Profile

May 17, 2015 in News

Terry Anderson-1

PROFESSIONAL CARTOONISTS’ Organisation member, Terry Anderson has been a cartoonist since the age of seventeen with illustrations and strips for The Glasgow Herald.

He studied at the Joe Kubert School in New Jersey before returning to Scotland and becoming a founding member of the Scottish Cartoon Art Studio in 1999. Since then he’s served in an organisational role as well as working as a cartoonist, most recently getting the Auld Acquaintance Exhibition on the road (you can see the PCO coverage HERE. Terry has also been a past president of the Scottish Artists Union.

Visual Minute

As well as caricaturing (as well as workshops, most recently at the Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival) Terry does a lot of visual minutes/graphic recording; this is when  cartoonist is hired by companies to graphically illustrate the main points of a business discussion. His most recent ‘visual minutes’ gig was for the Scottish Parliament’s Cross Party Group on Culture; nothing on their site yet but, apparently, drawings will appear there shortly.

Caricature Commission

Illustrations for educational and promotional purposes are also part of the Terry Anderson mix.

Terry usually keeps an eye on topical affairs on his Twitter account HERE.

The Studio and SAU: http://scottishcartoons.com   http://www.sau.org.uk

GE2015 Leaders-1

Cartoonist Terry Anderson – Profile

May 17, 2015 in General, News

Terry Anderson-1

PROFESSIONAL CARTOONISTS’ Organisation member, Terry Anderson has been a cartoonist since the age of seventeen with illustrations and strips for The Glasgow Herald.

He studied at the Joe Kubert School in New Jersey before returning to Scotland and becoming a founding member of the Scottish Cartoon Art Studio in 1999. Since then he’s served in an organisational role as well as working as a cartoonist, most recently getting the Auld Acquaintance Exhibition on the road (you can see the PCO coverage HERE. Terry has also been a past president of the Scottish Artists Union.

Visual Minute

As well as caricaturing (as well as workshops, most recently at the Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival) Terry does a lot of visual minutes/graphic recording; this is when  cartoonist is hired by companies to graphically illustrate the main points of a business discussion. His most recent ‘visual minutes’ gig was for the Scottish Parliament’s Cross Party Group on Culture; nothing on their site yet but, apparently, drawings will appear there shortly.

Caricature Commission

Illustrations for educational and promotional purposes are also part of the Terry Anderson mix.

Terry usually keeps an eye on topical affairs on his Twitter account HERE.

The Studio and SAU: http://scottishcartoons.com   http://www.sau.org.uk

GE2015 Leaders-1

Profile of PCO Chairperson/ Cartoonist Bill Stott

April 27, 2015 in General

PROFESSIONAL CARTOONISTS’ Organisation Chairperson, Bill Stott had a varied start to working life. He says that he was “a lot of ‘exes’” – including using his Fine Art degree as an ex-Art Teacher and ex-Schools Inspector. Quite what he was inspecting at schools isn’t told but it undoubtedly contributed to his ever-flowing reservoir of ideas for cartoon gags.

Bill’s cartoons started appearing a wide range of publications including Punch, The Oldie, Private Eye, Automobile and Classic Car Buyer, Saga Magazine and an obvious candidate for the Have I Got News For You Magazine of the week, The Stationary Engine.

Over forty cartoon books were produced over the years and Bill is looking forward to two new ones being published after a gap of eight years. In the corporate/private sector, Bill’s cartoons are often used on humorous calendars.

A regular participant and organiser of the Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival (although, unfortunately, not this year), Bill has always been a prominent fixture at the Big Boards with his unique giant water-colour style of huge cartoon.

Bill Stott at Big Board

As the Chairperson of the Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation, Bill keeps a protective eye on the concerns and struggles of UK professional cartoonists from all walks of life and is currently steering the way through to the imminent publication of Draw The Line Here, a collection of Charlie Hebdo-inspired cartoons, in aid of their familes and for freedom of speech charity, English Pen. 

 

Shrewsbury International Cartoon Festival 2015

April 20, 2015 in News

AS USUAL, IT seems like a dream now. As with most Cartoon Festivals, they come and go in a flash with so many activities and social get-togethers lubricated by the products of many hostelries that ‘real life’ doesn’t seem real for the first couple of days back home.

The Twelfth Shrewsbury International Cartoon Festival (yes – TWELFTH!) went off with its customary sparkle provided by the town’s influx of cartoonists from all over the country. Oh, and one all the way from Australia, Dean Alston, just so that the ‘international’ tag could be legitimized!

The high-quality exhibition at the Bear Steps Gallery was on the theme of ‘Style’ this year and it was probably as loose-fitting a theme as you could get allowing an awful lot of leg-room for cartoony inspiration. Shrewsbury is spoiled by having a unique exhibition like this every year – on display for over a month, not just during the festival weekend.

The Market Square, as always provided a focal point for the public to spot cartoonists and caricaturists at work. The well-established favourites, the Big Boards, were as usual becoming repositories for brilliant works of cartoon art and well-thought out gags. The new concept of ‘cartoon busking’, initially performed by Roger Penwill and Noel Ford and the ‘quick-on-the-draw’ style entertainment of the Cartoon Melodrawma were more ingenious ways of bringing the concept of cartooning memorably under the public gaze. Workshops in both caricaturing and comic strips were on offer, thanks to Terry Anderson and Tim Harries and Guardian cartoonist Martin Rowson gave an illustrated talk on his view of the last five years of a coalition government.

As usual, the cartoonists sampled the hospitality of various establishments around the town and left the paper tabelcoths in the Henry Tudor House restaurant liberally spattered with cartoony inspiration.

Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival is probably the longest-running UK cartoon festival ever and its organisers are already meeting to discuss the agenda for the thirteenth one in 2016. Contrary to traditional belief, that’s a lucky number for many people.

Publishers must “create space for new cartoons” says PCO Chairman

February 10, 2015 in Comment

THE RECENT FLURRY of cartooning activity precipitated by the tragic events in Paris towards the beginning of January has caused several pauses for thought. When you get beyond the bigger picture of rights to freedom of speech and the arguments for and against depicting whatever religious leader, we cartoonists arrive at the same modern-day conundrum: Where are our cartoons being PUBLISHED?

While, the modern age allows a little self-satisfaction with instant ‘publication’ through the media of Facebook and Twitter, it’s a sort of vanity-publishing whose merits shrink in size next to a big fat commission from a national newspaper or, perhaps, a global advertising campaign. Many cartoonists acquire a steady stream of, mainly private or ‘below the line’, bread and butter work by advertising themselves as such on social media but the kudos of being chosen by an art editor or creative director is a much less frequent experience these days. Perhaps, this is partly the fault of the aforementioned social media, too?

Cartoon-Editor-Save-Money

Bill Stott, the Chairman of the Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation writes:

The Draw the Line Here book of mainly UK cartoons, many from members of the PCO demonstrates, proves even, the power of good cartoons. The book will be published. Through sales of the book, funds will be sent to the relatives and families of those so mindlessly murdered in France. All of that is as it should be.

But what really puzzles, nay, infuriates me is that in the face of this demonstration of the power of humour, many UK publishers are ditching their cartoonists like unwanted ballast. The UK boasts some of the best cartoonists in the world. On current performance, UK publishers, of newspapers and magazines, do not value the UK’s professional cartooning talent. How many local newspapers still carry cartoons? Not many, in my view. What replaces the cartoon? Adverts?

The public loves cartoons. UK cartoon festivals, like Shrewsbury’s prove this, year on year. But there is an obvious disconnect between publishers’ thinking about cartoons and what the public like. New media, so-called social media, tweets, apps, and mobiles which can make toast or tell you what’s in your fridge might well have a hand in this disconnect, but the public doesn’t really have a voice here. It’s as likely to write to papers en masse about a lack of cartoons as there is to be a ninety percent turnout in a local government by-election. Newspaper sales are falling fast. It’s time for UK publishers to take a gamble. They must stop regarding the cartoon as the easiest thing to drop and be revolutionary. Reinstate dumped cartoons. Create space for new cartoons. Get brave! Bill Stott, Chair, PCO

Cartoon-Editor-Accountant

Cartoonists rally around for Draw The Line Here Cartoon Book

February 9, 2015 in News

Cartoonists rally around in aid of Charlie Hebdo families and Freedom of Speech

Draw The Line Cartoon Book Cover

THE PROFESSIONAL CARTOONISTS’ Organisation has been heavily-occupied with work on the  Draw The Line Here Cartoon Book in aid of the Charlie Hebdo victims and in support of freedom of speech charity English Pen.

Approached by the crowdfunding platform Crowdshed, the Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation are aiming to produce ’100 cartoons by 100 cartoonists’ in reaction to the terrorist murders of cartoonists and others in Paris on January 7th. Freedom of Speech charity English Pen were also approached to form a three-part partnership in order to create a historic collection of cartoons by some of the UK’s best cartoonists.

Contributions from cartooning icons such as Ralph Steadman, Steve Bell, Martin Rowson and Dave Brown are promising to make this a cartoon book to be given pride of place in any collection. it will be an assortment of political cartoons, gag cartoons and caricature illustrations and will be a very memorable, entertaining and yet poignant landmark in cartoon publishing.

The book campaign received a boost from Stephen Fry recently who kindly retweeted our appeal for more people to advance-purchase the book.

Tweet from Stephen Fry for Cartoon Book

We’re still urgently collecting funds throught the crowdfunding site Crowdshed, and YOU can be one of the first to receive the book once it’s published. Simply go HERE and choose your option!

St Just for laughs

October 22, 2014 in Events, General, News

St Just poster © Daryl Cagle

St Just poster © Daryl Cagle

Simon Ellinas writes:

I was lucky enough to be able to visit the Salon International Du Dessins de Presse et d’Humor at St Just-le-Martel in France. Impressively installed in a brand new building on the outskirts of this small satellite of the city of Limoges, this cartoon festival has been running for 33 years.

The permanent display of cartoons and caricatures from around the world makes this the largest public museum of cartoon art in Europe. The last time I was there, five years ago, the events took place inside a series of marquees, while the first bricks for the centre were being laid.

My cartoonist friend John Landers and I travelled by Eurostar to Paris where we met other cartoonists. The travel is laid on by the festival organisers and local residents put visitors up in their own homes. I was delighted to find that we had been handed over to my previous hosts, who live in a very spacious and comfortable house 12km away in Boisseuils.

Cartoonists Simon Ellinas, left, and John landers, second right, with new friends at the St Just festival

Cartoonists Simon Ellinas, left, and John landers, second right, with their hosts at the St Just festival

The whole weekend is taken up with a huge exhibition of cartoons and caricatures from around the world and a grand hall full of cartoonists drawing for the public. And the public really do appreciate this event, arriving in many hundreds on both days. The festival is actually spread out over ten or so days, with the first and second weekends being peaks of activity.

Various awards are handed out by the charismatic mayor and chief initiator of the whole thing, Gerard Vandenbroucke, the main award of the festival going to the Venezuelan cartoonist Rayma Suprani.

stjust_doc

We were treated to a French cabaret evening on the Friday and a superb visit to an old cinema in nearby St Leonard. This was to see the Cartooning for Peace documentary Caricaturistes: Fantassins de la Democratie (poster above). This featured 12 cartoonists from around the world who have been working, many under great restrictions from their governments, to uphold their rights to democracy and to free speech.

Featuring Suprana as well as the Cartooning for Peace organiser Jean Plantu, the film also revealed the difficulties faced by cartoonists as far afield as China, Palestine and Israel. A very moving film which I would urge you to see.

Daryl Cagle, left, with a caricature drawn by Philippe Moine, right

Daryl Cagle, left, with a caricature drawn by Philippe Moine, right

There was a contingent of political cartoonists from America, led by Daryl Cagle and including Monte Wolverton, Rick McKee, Steve Sack, Nate Beeler and Adam Zygler. The differences between US and UK political cartooning are interesting to compare. My impression is that the UK style is more predominantly “painterly” while the US cartoons are heavily populated with a very cartoony comic-strip style.

Jean Gouders, in the striped  shirt, and John Landers, in the traditional "defacing" of tablecloths

Jean Gouders, in the striped shirt, and John Landers, demonstrate the traditional “defacing” of tablecloths

Of course, part of the celebration and festivity are the meals with fellow cartoonists and friends. These take place at long tables in a huge marquee with the paper tablecloths becoming the centre of attention for all the artists and their arsenals of pens and markers.

All in all, a very inspiring if ultimately exhausting experience. I’ll be back.