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The Round-up

November 10, 2013 in General, Links, News

© Mike Williams @Procartoonists.org

In the wake of recent disappointing decisions elsewhere in the mainstream press, it’s encouraging to see cartoons being celebrated this week in a major newspaper. The Independent is the latest to provide coverage of Private Eye’s new retrospective cartoon book, and PCO members feature prominently in the article, which includes quotes from Nick Newman and is accompanied by classic gags from Ken Pyne and Mike Williams (above), among others. Read the article here.

Bob Mankoff, The New Yorker’s cartoon editor, reveals the exhaustive lengths he and his staff go to in order to ensure cartoons used by the magazine bear no similarity to ones already used.

The latest Asterix book – and the first without co-creator Albert Uderzo wielding the pen – has launched to strong sales. Meanwhile, on this side of the Channel, Stephen Collins has received a nomination for his graphic novel, The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil, for this year’s Waterstones Book of the Year. Hear from Collins and fellow strip cartoonist Tom Gauld in this video from the Edinburgh Book Festival.

Comic strips, of course, are nothing new – but cartoonists are always finding new ways to approach them.

 

The Round-up

May 10, 2013 in Events, General, Links, News

© Christian Adams for The Telegraph @Procartoonists.org

The Premier League was rocked this week by the unexpected news of Sir Alex Ferguson‘s retirement, and cartoonists had a ball with it (sorry). In The Telegraph, Christian Adams put the news in context (above), while Matt Pritchett drew parallels with another recent shock resignation. Over in The Guardian, Kipper Williams considered the impact on industry. On the news that David Moyes is taking the reins, Procartoonists.org member Andy Davey pictures the handover in The Sun.

Rob Murray (full disclosure: the writer of this post!) will be opening up his studio to the public from 16-19 May, exhibiting and selling original cartoons from Private Eye, Reader’s Digest, The Spectator and elsewhere as part of the Summer Open Studios show at Wimbledon Art Studios. Entry is free and all are very welcome.

Stephen Collins celebrates the publication of his new book, The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil, with a launch party this evening at Gosh! in London. See preview pages in the ‘Big Comics’ section of his website.

Own-it offers a helpful and concise look at the ongoing controversial changes to UK copyright legislation, which pave the way for licensing of orphan works. Read it here.

An obituary for Margaret Groening reveals that her son – Simpsons creator Matt – believes in writing about what (or who) he knows. The Telegraph picks up on the story and provides this handy interactive family tree.

And finally, having recently challenged New Yorker cartoonists to a reverse-engineered caption contest, cartoon editor Bob Mankoff invites readers to have a go.

 

The Round-up

March 4, 2013 in General, Links, News

Above: an animation by Procartoonists.org member Paul Baker, commissioned for (and projected at) the launch of the new InterContinental London Westminster hotel. Inspired by its location, the hotel is politically themed and features a gallery of cartoons by Gerald Scarfe alongside other political caricatures.

Fellow PCO member Ian Baker is one of a number of international cartoonists who have contributed artwork to a new book about 007. Ian has also written a foreword for James Bond: 50 Years in Caricatures. The book is seeking crowd-funded contributions in order to be released in special-edition hardcover format. Click here to look inside the book and pledge your support.

The Daily Cartoonist has posted a 1986 TV interview with Gary Larson, creator of The Far Side. Watch it here.

A new online reality show, Strip Search, is pitting a dozen cartoonists against each other.

Finally, cartoonist and illustrator Stephen Collins has produced a series of designs for the Time to Change campaign to end mental health discrimination. Some of the work can be seen here, and several of his designs can be sent as e-cards by clicking here. Collins comments on the campaign here.

The post-Christmas Round-up

December 28, 2012 in General, Links, News

© Robert Thompson @Procartoonists.org

The gifts may have been exchanged and the turkey polished off, but there’s still time for a few festive treats of the cartooning variety that may have escaped your attention over the Christmas period.

You can enjoy every installment of Peattie and Taylor‘s 15-part seasonal Alex tale, It’s A Wonderful Crisis, as it unfolds over at the Telegraph site.

Quentin Blake becomes a Sir in the new Year’s Honours. The BBC describes him as  an illustrator*.

Procartoonists.org member Royston Robertson has put together a cartoon advent calendar again this year, with a different gag posted to his blog each day in the run-up to Christmas. Take a look at Royston’s festive goodies here. Elsewhere, The Telegraph’s Matt Pritchett provides a topical – but far less appealing – advent calendar of his own.

Ben Jennings brings a Dickensian feel to proceedings over at The Guardian, while Martin Rowson riffs on the Slaughter of the Innocents for the same paper. At The Telegraph, Christian Adams has his own take on Plebgate.

For The Independent, Dave Brown cautions against festive overeating and Peter Schrank brings a topical slant to the Christmas sales. Finally, Stephen Collins takes the PM on a merry chase for The Spectator.

* Please feel to discuss ‘what’ he is in the comments should you be so minded.

The Round-up

February 17, 2012 in Links

Rosie Brooks, a member of the Professional Cartoonists’  Organisation, which runs the Bloghorn, has found a piece of her artwork adorning a US postage stamp. That’s because she painted the guitar that Sir Paul McCartney is pictured with on one of a range of stamps for the animal welfare charity PETA. You can watch Rosie painting the guitar (at high speed) here.

The Christian Institute has latched onto a recent cartoon by The Telegraph’s Matt Pritchett, arguing that his gag reflects public opinion over the recent banning of prayers as part of council meetings. You can read their take on the cartoon here.

Stephen Collins, cartoonist for The Guardian, Prospect, The Spectator and others, has contributed a range of cartoon postcard designs for the Time To Change mental health campaign. See them here.

Forbidden Planet reports here on Marvel’s legal victory over the comic-book writer Gary Friedrich, while The Daily Cartoonist points out that the legal tussle does the publisher no favours with fans.

Lord Baker of Dorking appears on the Panel Borders podcast to discuss his love of cartoons and his contributions to the Cartoon Museum’s latest exhibition, Her Maj.

And finally, Matt Groening, creator of The Simpsons, Life In Hell and Futurama,  has received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Prize guys

November 10, 2010 in General, News

Image © Stephen Collins from In Room 208

On Sunday, the winner of the fourth Cape/Observer Graphic Short Story prize was announced as Stephen Collins. His story - In Room 208won him £1,000 and a full reprint of the tale in the Observer newspaper.

Collins was chosen by a jury that included comic historian and organiser of the Comica festival Paul Gravett, illustrator David Hughes and The Time Traveler’s Wife author Audrey Niffenegger, who also highlighted Square Eyes by Anna Mill and Luke Jones as the runner up. The winning entries and five other ‘commended’ entries can be seen at the Graphic Short Story Prize Exhibition at Orbital Comics, 8 Great Newport Street, London WC2, until the 30th November.

British cartoonist and comic artist Dave Gaskill has won the award for Best Comic Book Artist at the Stanley Awards for his graphic novel Moll Perkins in America. BBC Lincolnshire has a report here. The Stanleys are awarded annually by our brother, sister, and sheila organisation – the Australian Cartoonists’ Association.

You can also  find cartoonist Frank Dickens and his character Bristow published regularly in Australia’s Melbourne Herald and Sydney Morning Herald.

The stories of a company man have been in continuous publication since they first appeared in the Aberdeen Press and Journal on the 18th September 1961 and happily this amazing achievement been included in the latest Guinness Book of World Records as the longest-running cartoon strip by a single author.

Bloghorn’s congratulations to all three.

2010 Election cartoon round-up

May 12, 2010 in General

Keep Calm and Cameron cartoon ©Nathan Ariss Find his portfolio at http://www.procartoonists.org UK Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation

Alex Hughes reports.

You may have not noticed, but there’s been a general election in Britian recently. And a general election means it’s open season for the political cartoonists, so here Bloghorn presents a brief summary of the events of the last month or so in cartoon form, starting at the beginning of the election with Dave Brown of the Independent on the runners and riders and the Guardian‘s Martin Rowson on the approaching media obsession.
During the campaign The Guardian‘s Steve Bell talks about drawing at the manifesto launches, the Sky debate, and drawing Nick Clegg, Peter Mandelson and David Cameron (and the cartoon that came from this).

The TV debates may have changed the direction of the election, but they were seen differently by Tim Sanders in the Independent, Dave Brown, Peter Brookes of the Times, Steve Bell and Paul Thomas of the Daily Expesss,whilst Morten Morland of the Times produced a series of short animated responses to each of the debates (ITV, Sky, BBC).

The debates lead to widespread Cleggmania as seen by Stephen Collins in Prospect, Matt in the Daily Telegraph, Martin Rowson and Paul Thomas, and the inevitable media backlash as satirised by Peter Brookes and Dave Brown.

Gordon Brown made what was probably the biggest political gaffe of the campaign by calling a member of the public a “bigoted woman”; Peter Brookes, and Dave BrownMac of the Daily MailPaul Thomas provided their own takes on Bigotgate.

The election night itself inspired Tim Sanders and Matt, but as we now know it resulted in a hung parliament, as shown variously the Sun‘s Andy DaveyDave Brown, Matt, Peter Brookes, Paul Thomas and Mac (and even a hung parliament themed game), Gordon Brown’s departure as seen by Nick Garland and eventually the Con-Lib coalition Christian AdamsTim SandersMorten Morland and Martin Rowson.

Looking forward to the challenges for the new Government were Harry Venning’s Clare in the Community and Kal in the Economist, and looking back, Bloghorn‘s very own Matt Buck produced a series of  weekly despatches for the Guardian from the 1710 campaign as seen by Tobias Grubbe (2, 3, 4, 5).  The Times produced a 9 page comic summary of the election campaign available for download here (PDF, 7Mb).

(“Keep Calm and Cameron” cartoon by Nathan Ariss).

The Editor adds: We are bound to have missed many other great examples of cartooning so please do feel free to add things you have seen in the comments. Thanks.

Avatar of Royston

by Royston

Prospect magazine profiles cartoonists and launches new strip

June 8, 2009 in General

stephencollins
Helping mammon soften his image, by Stephen Collins

The Prospect magazine blog continues its Cartoonist of the Month series by firing questions at PCOer Alex Matthews. You can also read interviews on the bog with Nick Downes and Clive Goddard.

Meanwhile, the magazine has also announced a new regular cartoon strip, excerpt above, drawn by Times cartoonist and Cartoon Art Trust award winner Stephen Collins.

Avatar of Royston

by Royston

The 14th Cartoon Art Trust Awards

November 20, 2008 in General

The Cartoon Art Trust Awards were presented last night at The Mall Galleries in London. The trust, which runs the Cartoon Museum in London, has presented the awards annually since 1995. Gag cartoonist Grizelda, left, was among the winners.

PCOer and Private Eye regular Will “Wilbur” Dawbarn was there and sent Bloghorn this personal report:

I was fortunate enough to be invited to join the Private Eye table this year, and what a star-studded occasion it seemed to this small-town boy! I even got my suit out of mothballs for the occasion.

After a brief time spent standing around with no-one to talk to, trying to earwig Ken Clarke’s conversation (for cartoon research purposes of course), scoffing as many canapés as I could get my hands on, and examining some marvellous Giles originals, I soon fell in with the coterie of Eye cartoonists, particularly the garrulous Simon Pearsall (“First Drafts”), who chatted non-stop in my left ear (most entertainingly) during the meal, leaving me only dimly aware of cartoons being auctioned off for thousands of pounds and awards being dished out to the worthy.

In my right ear at the table was Mark Warren, the writer of the Celeb strip. It turns out it’s only Charles Peattie who does both Alex and Celeb – I’d always assumed it was the same writer-artist combo doing both.

I missed a few more awards whilst outside having a fag with Simon P. and Martin Rowson (who was very charming and gracious to the winner of the Under 18 Young Cartoonist of the Year award, telling her to email him for advice and the like – though he bluntly refused me the same courtesy when I enquired …)

The Award Winners

Joke cartoon award: Grizelda of the New Statesman and others

Strip cartoon award: Stephen Collins of the Times

Pocket cartoon award: Jeremy Banks aka “Banx” of the FT

Caricature award: Nicola Jennings of the Guardian

Political cartoon award: Nicholas Garland of the Daily Telegraph

Young cartoonists of the year: Emilia Franklin (under 18) and James Hood (under 30).

The Pont prize for drawing the British Character: Charles Peattie and Russell Taylor of the Daily Telegraph for Alex. The Pont Award was set up five years ago in memory of Graham “Pont” Laidler, whose drew the brilliant series The British Character in Punch in the 1930s and 40s.

Lifetime achievement award: Raymond Briggs. The creator of the acclaimed books The Snowman and When the Wind Blows was responsible for some of the earliest British “graphic novels” – long before the term or the form was generally known. Previous winners of the award have included, Ronald Searle, Gerald Scarfe, Fluck and Law, and Trog.

PCOer Morten Morland has a first person report here as does Christian Adams of the Telegraph has his take on the events here too and Down the Tubes also has a round up.

The PCO: Great British cartoon talent