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The Round-up

November 26, 2013 in Events, General, Links, News

© Steve Bright @Procartoonists.org

Above: This cartoon by Steve Bright – a member of Procartoonists.org – is one of 12 political cartoons selected as among the best of the year by BuzzFeed. Other PCOers, Gary Barker and Martin Rowson, are also included. See the full list here.

Elsewhere another of our cartoonists, Steve Bell, talks to the BBC about the history of political cartooning and its legacy today. Watch the video here.

An exhibition of some 90 prints by Thomas Rowlandson has opened in Edinburgh. See the Daily Record for more information.

Head over to the Forbidden Planet blog for a full overview of the winners of this year’s British Comic Awards. The Herald speaks to the best emerging talent winner Will Morris, while FP itself looks at Garen Ewing, winner of the young people’s award, which was voted for by children.

And finally, the cartoonist and illustrator Ros Asquith talks to BookTrust about how she uses her work to highlight disability and diversity.

The Round-up

October 13, 2013 in Events, General, Links, News

Cartoon © Tony Husband / Photo © Rob Doyle @Procartoonists.org

Above: It’s difficult to whinge when your work is given pride of place in a fancy art gallery, but Procartoonists.org member Tony Husband still managed to include this observation of the cartooning community in the Hey Wayne! cartoon show currently taking place in Manchester. Tony’s art-related cartoons share the walls of the Richard Goodall Gallery with the work of fellow PCOers Bill Stott and Chris Madden, as well as that of Bill Tidy. Thanks to Rob Doyle for the photo, taken at Saturday’s private view. (There are many more pictures available here on Facebook.)

Another of our members, the fresh-faced and talented Will McPhail, was featured on ITV News last week after being named Young Cartoonist of the Year.

Steve Bell will be at the University of Aberdeen next month to give a free talk about early visual satirists including Hogarth, Gillray and Cruikshank. Find more details here. Another of those early satirists, Thomas Rowlandson, will be the subject of an exhibition in Edinburgh later this year.

Denise Dorrance talks about Mimi, her new cartoon series for The Mail on Sunday’s You supplement, in this interview.

And finally, the Illustration Cupboard gallery in London will be holding a selling exhibition of Daily Express cartoons by Paul Thomas, opening on 24 October. See the invite here.

The Round-up

September 1, 2013 in Events, General, Links, News

© Stanley Franklin @Procartoonists.org

Cartoons of Margaret Thatcher – including The Pit and The Pendulum by Stanley Franklin, above, has been showing at Leeds Gallery over the summer. Read a review of the exhibition here.

The British Cartoonists’ Association is on the lookout once again for Young Cartoonists of the Year and will now also accept digitally produced artwork (although a hard copy must be submitted). Find out more about how to enter the contest here.

Artwork from Procartoonists.org member Hunt Emerson‘s adaptations of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Frankenstein will be exhibited by The Wordsworth Trust in Grasmere, Cumbria, for one month from 4 October. Read more at downthetubes.net.

Procartoonists.org member Steve Bell discusses his depictions of US presidents in this audio interview and transcript.

Those interested in going behind the scenes with cartoonists and illustrators should check out both The Tools Artists Use and 20 Questions With Cartoonists.

The Oldie, one of the most high-profile markets for UK gag cartoonists, has reached 300 issues. Richard Ingrams, founder of the magazine and former editor of Private Eye, looks back on his time with both organs in this piece from The Telegraph. A new Oldie Book of Cartoons is released next month.

Also due to land on bookshelves and coffee tables in September is Private Eye: A Cartoon History. Edited by longtime Eye man Nick Newman, the book will feature more than 1,000 gags from the past 50 years. It certainly looks jam-packed, if these sample pages are anything to go by.

Ed adds: Late entry from Sarah McIntyre, aka @Jabberworks, at the Telegraph: Comic adventures for kids of all ages.

Avatar of Royston

by Royston

The Round-up

March 29, 2013 in General, Links, News

Birmingham Arts Lab by Hunt Emerson

Birmingham Arts Lab © Hunt Emerson

Hunt Emerson has been interviewed for Birmingham’s Flatpack Festival as part of a respective on the Birmingham Arts Lab, above, the influential arts collective that ran from the late 1960s to the early 1980s. The article is here.

Meanwhile, Pete Ashton, who carried out the interview, talks about meeting one of his cartooning heroes on his blog.

It’s ten years since the invasion of Iraq and The Guardian has a video of Steve Bell talking about his cartoons on the subject. It’s every bit as angry and vitriolic as you might expect.

“Ask most people in Wales to name a famous cartoonist, and the odds are that an overwhelming majority would say Gren” , the BBC correctly surmises, but it points out that J.M. Staniforth,whose work first appeared in 1890, blazed a trail. The work of the Western Mail cartoonist is now being digitised.

The issue of same-sex marriage is as current in the US as it is here, with the matter being discussed by the Supreme Court. The International Business Times has a round-up showing how cartoonists have responded. While The New Yorker has a round-up of marriage cartoons, same-sex and otherwise.

David Cameron drawings by Ian Cater

David Cameron drawings © Ian Cater

Cartoonists are not usually too pleased when politicians approve of their work, but in the case of a series of cartoons of David Cameron, at least it’s in a good cause.

The Prime Minister gave a thumbs-up to the drawings by Ian Cater, above, showing him in the garb of various musical genres, which were originally drawn to publicise the Witney Music Festival, in the PM’s constituency. Now they are being sold to raise money for a local hospice.

The Round-up

February 1, 2013 in General, Links, News

Above: a timely rant from animator Stephen Silver about the perils of agreeing to produce creative work ‘on spec’. (Originally seen at Tom’s Mad Blog)

The HS2 rail proposal provided plenty of fodder for cartoonists on the dailies this week. For The Telegraph, Christian Adams assesses George Osborne’s involvement here and here, while Matt Pritchett suggests a get-out clause. In The Daily Mail, Mac focused on what might almost turn out to be the reality for commuters. Meanwhile, Procartoonists.org member Steve Bell looks down the track for The Guardian.

Bell’s stablemate at the Guardian, fellow PCO member Martin Rowson, is interviewed for the paper alongside comedian (and occasional cartoonist) Phill Jupitus. Read the Q&A here.

After his car was towed away, New Yorker cartoonist Corey Pandolph decided to sell some of his ‘unselected’ cartoons on Etsy to cover his costs. The Huffington Post has more on Pandolph’s plight here.

Finally, a selection of drawings by the late, great Ronald Searle is set to be offered at auction.

Publishers, the patrons of the art

January 29, 2013 in Comment, General, News

A public kerfuffle over a Gerald Scarfe cartoon published after the recent Israeli elections has resulted in a public apology from Rupert Murdoch the publisher of The Sunday Times, the paper in which the image appeared.

A publisher apology is a rare thing in journalism of any sort but it should be noted that neither the paper, its acting editor or the cartoonist himself have apologised for the publication of the image itself. Any regret expressed has been directed towards the timing of publication, as the cartoon appeared on Holocaust Memorial Day.

If nothing else, this story reveals that even within strictly hierarchical print-publication businesses, dissent and, perhaps, mistakes are still possible.

Updated 10am: You can listen to a lively debate on Radio 4 Today between cartoonist Steve Bell (one of our members) and Stephen Pollard, editor of The Jewish Chronicle.

Updated 6.15pm: The cartoonist has issued a short statement. The acting editor of the newspaper, Martin Ivens, has now also offered an apology stating that the cartoonist “had crossed a line”. You can read the full statement from the newspaper here.

Updated 9am, 30 January: Press Gazette (UK journalism trade magazine) reports that Scarfe’s cartoon is now also removed from all e-editions of The Sunday Times.

You may also watch the BBC Newsnight segment on the story on iPlayer.

The Round-up

January 4, 2013 in General, Links, News

© Gerald Scarfe @Procartoonists.org

Gerald Scarfe has revisited an old project by producing a new series of cartoons to illustrate the on-screen revival of Yes, Prime Minister. This drawing, above, of its stars David Haig and Henry Goodman, is also gracing billboards and bus shelters ahead of the show’s debut on the TV channel Gold on 15 January. Scarfe produced a memorable series of cartoons for the original Yes, Minister series. Those suffering from Thatcherite nostalgia can watch the original opening credits here.

Steve Bell guides us through a year of cartoons for The Guardian in this video (warning: contains expletives, contraceptives and bondage gear). Meanwhile, Peter Brookes selects the best from his own 2012 output for The Times (subscription required), and the Daily Mail’s Mac does the same here. Matt Buck (Hack) looks back at his own 2012 output here.

Dotter of Her Father’s Eyes, written by Mary Talbot and illustrated by her comics veteran husband, Bryan, has won the biography category of the 2012 Costa Book Awards – the first graphic novel to win in any of the five categories. Read more about the book, and what its success might mean for the medium more generally, here.

The weekly children’s comic The Phoenix has launched an app that allows readers to buy and download a digital version, and which includes free access to a sample “issue zero”.

And finally, Procartoonists.org patron Martin Wainwright brings us the story of an intriguing battle over intellectual property and the public domain.

Procartoonists bag couple of CATs

December 10, 2012 in Events, News

The Cartoon Art Trust Awards, an annual fundraiser for the Cartoon Museum in London, were held last week, and this year’s winners, including two Procartoonists.org members were as follows:

Christmas cartoon by KJ Lamb

Cartoon © KJ Lamb

Joke cartoonist Kathryn Lamb, above, (Private Eye, The Oldie, The Spectator)

Strip cartoonist Steve Bell for “If …” (The Guardian)

Pocket cartoonist Banx (aka Jeremy Banks, Financial Times)

Caricaturist James Ferguson (Financial Times)

Political cartoonist Christian Adams (Daily and Sunday Telegraph)

Congratulations to all the winners.

 

Cartoon round-up: Bob Diamond and the MPs

July 5, 2012 in Comment, General, News

Stanley McMurtry in The Daily Mail @ procartoonists.org

“You fool, Bob! How are we going to manage now?” © Stanley McMurtry for The Daily Mail @ procartoonists.org

Following our post on Monday about Bob Diamond of Barclays bank, here is how some of the UK’s cartoonists have responded to his resignation and appearance at the Treasury Select Committee at Westminster.

Dave Brown Independent cartoon on Barclays @ procartoonists.org

© Dave Brown for The Independent @ procartoonists.org

Steve Bell for The Guardian @procartoonist.org

© Steve Bell for The Guardian @ procartoonists.org

Matt Pritchett in the Telegraph @ procartoonists.org

© Matt Pritchett for the Telegraph @ procartoonists.org

Matt Buck cartoon for MSN @procartoonists.org

© Matt Buck Hack cartoon for MSN @ procartoonists.org

Andy Davey cartoon in the Sun @ procartoonists.org

© Andy Davey for The Sun @ procartoonists.org

Kerber and Black at The Mirror @ procartoonists.org

© Neil Kerber and David Black for The Mirror @ procartoonists.org

Kipper Williams for The Guardian @procartoonists.org

© Kipper Williams for The Guardian @procartoonists.org

 

If you have seen any more we should feature please let us know in the comments. Our membership portfolios are also full of work like this.

Round up – What the Bloghorn saw

October 7, 2011 in News

Hergé’s most controversial Tintin book, the infamous Tintin in the Congo, has come under fire again, with a Belgian court being asked to ban the comic bookon the grounds of racism.

Political cartoonist and PCO member Steve Bell has been busy on the party conference circuit over the past few weeks for the Guardian, which has posted a selection of his sketches from this week’s Tory get-together in Manchester.

Maus, the Pulitzer-winning graphic novel by underground cartoonist Art Spiegelman, is 25 years old. In a new book, MetaMaus, he tells the story of how he created his epic Holocaust allegory. NPR has a 30-minute interview with Spiegelman here.

US satirical cartoonist Peter Bagge - who received advice from Spiegelman early in his career – has been interviewed by Reason, the libertarian magazine for which he has been a contributor since 2003. Bagge talks about his political views and how they have affected his comics work – watch the video here.

Ahead of an exhibition of magazine illustrations by Edward Sorel at the School of Visual Arts in New York, the cartoonist and illustrator has been interviewed by The Atlantic about his long career. You can read the article here.

The Bloghorn is made on behalf of the UK Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation