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by Royston

The Round-up

March 19, 2014 in Events, General, Links, News

Boredom by Thomas Rowlandson

Boredom by Thomas Rowlandson @ Procartoonists.org

A new exhibition called The Long Nineteenth Century, which looks at British art from 1789 to 1918, opened at the Chris Beetles Gallery in London this week.

Many of those charting the huge changes in society over this period were cartoonists, of course, and the show features work by Gillray and Rowlandson, above, through to Tenniel and Heath Robinson. The exhibition runs until 12 April.

A study of 20th century satire, the Arena documentary Whatever Happened to Spitting Image?is to be broadcast on BBC Four tomorrow (20 March). See clips and more here. It ties in with the puppet show’s 30th anniversary celebrations.

Still on BBC Four documentaries with questioning titles, the Scottish comic book artist Frank Quitely has been profiled in What Do Artists Do All Day?, which you can watch now on iPlayer.

The organisers of the Melksham Comic Con in Wiltshire are looking to expand the event in 2014 and have turned to Kickstarter for help. They clearly had fun making this “charity appeal” for the non-profit event. The target is just £5,000 and they emphasise that every £1 counts.

Salmond and Cameron From The Auld Acquaintance © Scottish Cartoon Art Studio
From The Auld Acquaintance © Scottish Cartoon Art Studio


The Scottish Cartoon Art Studio is injecting some much-needed humour into the independence debate with an international touring exhibition called The Auld Acquaintance, above. Find out more here.

This year Finland is celebrating the centenary of the birth of Tove Jansson, creator of the Moomins. If you don’t know your Moominmamma from your Moominpappa, you can get up to speed with this article by Mark Bosworth.

Finally, as if last week’s Bananaman vs Stephen Hawking photo wasn’t enough for fans of the Dandy superhero, we now hear that there is a Bananaman film in the works, though so far all we have to go on is this teaser campaign. The Metro suggests five other TV cartoons that should follow it to the big screen.

The Round-up

July 8, 2013 in General, Links, News

Above: Cartoon editor Bob Mankoff on the anatomy of a New Yorker cartoon. Over at New Yorker HQ, Mankoff’s blog features a guest column about using cartoon captions in the classroom.

Several months after taking The Dandy purely digital, DC Thomson has suspended its existing app, saying that “the technology and format have let us down”. But the company has stressed that this is not the end of Britain’s longest-running comic.

A spokesperson said: “Discussions and planning are already under way to re-examine The Dandy’s digital offering. It is still too early to announce what form this next stage will take but we would like to reassure readers that The Dandy remains a very important part of the company’s plans for the future.”

We at Procartoonists.org will revisit the story when there is more to tell.

Meanwhile, the Dandy contributor Jamie Smart has taken the opportunity to voice his opinions about what could be done to strengthen the British comics industry.

In a timely slideshow, Howard Tayler, a webcomic creator, looks at how cartoonists can succeed in the digital world.

Jonathan Pugh, the regular pocket cartoonist for the Daily Mail and procartoonists member, has a new range of greetings cards available online. Click here to peruse them.

And finally, how much do you know about the humble pencil?

The Round-up

January 11, 2013 in General, Links, News

Lord Snooty by Alexander Matthews for The Beano @Procartoonists.org

Procartoonists.org member Alexander Matthews has resurrected Lord Snooty for The Beano (above), and writes about his approach to the character on his blog. Snooty has been absent from the comic for a while (and was even replaced by his grandson for a time). Alex has also recently brought his distinctive style to another classic Beano character, Baby-Face Finlayson.

In more DC Thomson news, former Dandy editor Morris Heggie will be giving a talk about the comic’s 75 years at the National Library of Scotland in Edinburgh on 15 January. The talk, which follows a cartoon workshop for adults held on Wednesday, complements the library’s ongoing Dandy exhibition. Read more here.

Reassuring news (at least, reasonably reassuring)  for gag cartoonists came from Reader’s Digest (UK) this week, after mass redundancies painted a bleak picture. While the company – which was bought out of administration in 2010 – is downsizing and will no longer sell retail goods, it apparently intends to continue publishing the monthly magazine as normal. Read the story here.

Axe Cop, the bizarre webcomic created by a five-year-old boy and illustrated by his cartoonist older brother, has been made into an animated TV show. Watch a clip here.

And finally, click here to be taken on a brief tour of The Certified Hunt Emerson, an iPad app featuring more than 200 pages of work by the renowned underground cartoonist (and Procartoonists.org member).

 

 

The Round-up

December 22, 2012 in General, News

© Jamie Smart – Fumboo.org @ Procartoonists.org

They said it would be the end of the world, but they were wrong … The Dandy is still with us (albeit in digital form), as mentioned here last week. There is, however, a documentary on 75 years of the comic, Just Dandy, showing on BBC One on New Year’s Eve, featuring contributions from the likes of Frank Skinner, Brian Cox, Bill Paterson and Nick Park. The programme is only being shown in Scotland, sadly but perhaps it will turn up on the iPlayer.

Following on from last week’s series of articles in the New Statesman celebrating British comics, the Economist chips in with an article on the rise of the webcomic, whilst their editorial cartoonist Kevin ‘KAL’ Kallaugher reflects on 35 years of drawing for the magazine.

For another perspective on the state of British comics check out Dandy contributor Jamie Smart’s blog post “I love stupid comics”.

Less happily, The Guardian reports the death of its longtime cartoonist and illustrator Peter Clarke.

 

The Round-up

December 14, 2012 in General, Links, News

© Axel Scheffler for Royal Mail @Procartoonists.org

Axel Scheffler, the illustrator best known for his work on the Gruffalo books, has produced the designs for Royal Mail’s Christmas stamps this year. Scheffler talks to the BBC about this latest commission, and looks back at his early work, in this short video.

After widespread publicity about falling sales and the decision to cease printing, The Dandy has now gone digital. Check out the first issue of the interactive web comic here.

Newsagent Des Barr requested 50,000 copies of the last print edition of The Dandy and has been selling them from a pop-up store in Glasgow, as well as via the internet. Somewhat ironically, sales have apparently been strong – read about it here, or buy a copy.

In related coverage, New Statesman looks at the UK children’s comic industry – from the online Dandy to The Phoenix and others – and finds it is in rude health. The article is one of several published as part of a week-long celebration of British comics by the magazine. Find the other pieces here.

As part of The Guardian’s coverage of the Edinburgh International Book Festival, illustrator in residence Chris Riddell writes that he has high hopes for the future of illustration in the digital realm.

And finally, Procartoonists.org member Royston Robertson has written an article for Sabotage Times in which he lists 10 cartoonists who have influenced him.

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by Royston

The Dandy in the news

December 5, 2012 in General

You can’t have failed to hear the news about the end of the print edition of The Dandy, which ran across all the media yesterday.

BBC news had the story, national newspapers covered it, The One Show ran a profile of Desperate Dan (why do TV people always have to put the presenters in boxes with speech bubbles when they cover comics?) and there were early thoughts on the new digital edition.

But here are a few links you may have missed, blog posts from those closer to the story: Dandy contributors Andy Fanton, Jamie SmartLew Stringer and Wilbur Dawbarn.

Dandy looks back, and forward

October 24, 2012 in Events, News

Dandy exhibition

Dandy characters celebrate 75 years © DC Thomson and Co. Ltd

The Dandy: 75 Years of Biffs, Bangs and Banana Skins opens at the Cartoon Museum in London today.

The exhibition runs until 24 December, effectively out-living the comic itself, as the final print issue comes out on 4 December – 75 years to the day since its launch.

The comic will be moving online though, and the Cartoon Museum says that the exhibition will look forward “as Dandy prepares to embark on a new digital adventure“. It will include some exclusive material from the new Dandy which is currently in development,

Lots of favourite characters from the past feature in the show, such as Desperate Dan, Korky the Cat, Corporal Clot, Winker Watson, Brassneck and Bananaman. Younger readers will be able to see Harry Hill, PreSkool Prime Minister and other recent strips. Visit the Cartoon Museum website for more details.

The Round-up

August 31, 2012 in General, Links, News

Edward Lear @Procartoonists.org

Edward Lear is best known for his humorous illustrations and nonsense verse, but his highly-detailed zoological illustrations are the focus for a new exhibition at The Royal Society. Read more here.

With the Paralympic Games now underway, The Beano features Oscar Pistorius as a sporting special guest.

Mark Anderson outlines some of the major markets for a freelance cartoonist and shares some of his own experiences in this blog post. And at a time when protecting copyright seems more important than ever, Japanese artist Shuho Sato is allowing others to use and adapt his manga work without paying royalties.

And finally: a new book, Naked Cartoonists, sees cartoonists such as Sergio Aragonés, Art Spiegelman, Will Eisner, Charles Schulz,  and Scott Adams depicting themselves in the buff. Click here for a preview.

The Round-up

August 24, 2012 in General, Links, News

© Martin Rowson for The New Statesman @ procartoonists

After The New Statesman published this cover story in its current edition, The Spectator has responded by calling on the NS to publish more cartoons. Not a bad idea, if we say so ourselves…

Comics expert Paul Gravett interviews illustrator and picture-book author Shaun Tan over on his blog. As prevously mentioned, Tan will be in conversation with Quentin Blake at a Comica event this Monday, for which tickets have sold out.

Following the announcement that The Dandy is to cease printing in December, Charlie Brooker argues that the move to online-only is only natural – and also writes about his own early experiences as a cartoonist. Read the piece here. Elsewhere, Dandy regular Jamie Smart calls on other artists and comic fans to work together for the benefit of the medium. Read his views on the direction comics should take here.

Forbidden Planet has a sneak peak of Hunt Emerson‘s new adaptation of Dante’s Inferno, due out in October.

And finally, just to disprove all those people who think that capturing a likeness is easy…

The Round-up

August 19, 2012 in General, Links, News

© DC Thomson

The Dandy has received a huge amount of media interest since our post earlier this week about the comic’s struggle for survival, and sadly it has now been announced the last print edition will be published in December.

Judge Dredd co-creator John Wagner has paid tribute to the comic, and the Dandy cartoonists Jamie Smart, Lew Stringer and Procartoonists.org member Alexander Matthews have all said their piece in support of the comic, which will continue online. In a report for the BBC, Anita O’Brien, curator at The Cartoon Museum in London, points out that this does not signal the demise of comics as a format.

In happier Dandy-related news, publisher DC Thomson has teamed up with the University of Dundee to launch a competition asking cartoonists to revamp one of the comic’s old characters. Read more here.

Cartoonist Joe Sacco talks about the inevitable impact of subjectivity and morality on his war reportage, while a thought-provoking article considers the importance of truth and honesty in autobiographical comics.

Finally, Matt Pritchett, the celebrated pocket cartoonist for The Telegraph, tells the paper about how his experience of the housing market has inspired some of his pithiest cartoons.