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The Round-up

March 23, 2014 in Events, General, Links, News

Clive Goddard draws for Sport Relief at the BBC

Clive Goddard draws for Sport Relief at the BBC

Kasia Kowalska writes:

Procartoonists.org member Clive Goddard played his part in the most successful Sport Relief to date when he showed his support for BBC Radio 2 host Jo Whiley during her 26-hour treadmill challenge. He posted more pictures here.

More PCO members are out and about: Ahead of a talk at Hornchurch Library next week, Adrian Teal spoke to a local paper about his book The Gin Lane Gazette and political satire. And next month Martin Rowson is hosting a workshop for The Laurence Sterne Trust.

In anticipation of Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in the UK at the British Library, the artist behind Tank Girl and the band Gorillaz, Jamie Hewlett, has unveiled new artwork for the exhibition poster.

Following the parody-heavy backlash after the recent post on tax cuts by Grant Shapps on Twitter, Pam Cowburn of Open Rights Group bemoans the fact that UK copyright law is no laughing matter when it comes to parody. The planned reforms appear to have been kicked into the long grass due to parliamentary delays.

Bob Mankoff has written a memoir

Bob Mankoff has written a memoir that doubles as a guide for aspiring cartoonists

The memoirs of The New Yorker cartoon editor Bob Mankoff, went on on sale yesterday in the US (readers in the UK will have to wait until 14 April). How About Never — Is Never Good for You? My Life In Cartoons will become a guide for aspiring cartoonists, according to Janet Maslin of The New York Times.

To coincide with the release of the book, CBS’s 60 Minutes produced a report on Mankoff and the art of choosing cartoons.

The Washington Post caused a furore by publishing a cartoon by Zunar criticising the Malaysian government’s response to the disappearance of the Malaysian Airlines flight MH370. The Malaysian editorial cartoonist was previously charged for sedition in 2010 for publishing his book of cartoons Cartoon-O-Phobia.

Not every cartoonist has an asteroid named in their honour. 4942 Munroe bears the name of xkcd creator Randall Munroe whose book What If? is due to be published later this year.

The Seattle cartoonist Tatiana Gill has created a collection of comic art to celebrate Women’s History Month. What is that? you may ask. This cartoon by Rob Rogers of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette may help (or not!)

Finally, Procartoonists.org members never make mistakes, of course, but just in case, the BBC reports on a pen that spots errors.

The Round-up

February 10, 2014 in Events, General, Links, News

Kasia Kowalska writes:

Dave Walker, a Procartoonists member, talks about what makes him tick in a short film by Michal Dzierza, above, called Being A Cartoonist.

If you like to know what makes other people tick, a new exhibition celebrating the life and work of Mel Calman has opened at the Freud Museum in Hampstead, London. Titled Calman meets Freud, it explores the much-loved cartoonist’s interest in psychiatry and mental health.

Andy Davey has put his recent lecture on the future of political cartooning, which we previewed here, on his website “in windbaggy blog form” (his words, not ours).

Though they may not always admit it, cartoonists are often inspired by other cartoonists. Michael Maslin wanted to know what cartoon collections inspired his colleagues at The New Yorker. He calls these collections “Cartoon Bibles”.

scott adams book

Passion – even for cartoons – is not everything: Scott Adams, the man behind Dilbert, ponders the virtues of failure in this video interview. He has succeeded in writing a book about failure, above.

Sometimes even the most creative ventures fail, as the DrawQuest founder Chris Poole found out.

Yet some cartoons are destined for success. It has been 25 years since The Simpsons broke the mould and made social satire a household name. To celebrate, Lego has teamed up with Fox to re-create them as its iconic figures. Keeping with the celebratory spirit, the cartoonist and animator David Silverman has published early Simpsons drawings on Twitter.

Bill Watterson made the news by winning the Grand Prix at 41st Angouleme Festival in France for his timeless strip Calvin and Hobbes. Also, the 30th Aydın Doğan International Cartoon Competition in Turkey announced its winners, with the top prize going to a Polish cartoonist, Krzysztof Grzondziel.

One cartoonist who may be certain that such recognition will not present itself in his own country is Bonil of Ecuador. Following a press watchdog’s ruling that he had insulted Rafael Correa, the president, the newspaper El Universo was forced to publish a suitable “correction” from the cartoonist.

The Round-up

November 10, 2013 in General, Links, News

© Mike Williams @Procartoonists.org

In the wake of recent disappointing decisions elsewhere in the mainstream press, it’s encouraging to see cartoons being celebrated this week in a major newspaper. The Independent is the latest to provide coverage of Private Eye’s new retrospective cartoon book, and PCO members feature prominently in the article, which includes quotes from Nick Newman and is accompanied by classic gags from Ken Pyne and Mike Williams (above), among others. Read the article here.

Bob Mankoff, The New Yorker’s cartoon editor, reveals the exhaustive lengths he and his staff go to in order to ensure cartoons used by the magazine bear no similarity to ones already used.

The latest Asterix book – and the first without co-creator Albert Uderzo wielding the pen – has launched to strong sales. Meanwhile, on this side of the Channel, Stephen Collins has received a nomination for his graphic novel, The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil, for this year’s Waterstones Book of the Year. Hear from Collins and fellow strip cartoonist Tom Gauld in this video from the Edinburgh Book Festival.

Comic strips, of course, are nothing new – but cartoonists are always finding new ways to approach them.

 

The Round-up

August 11, 2013 in Events, General, Links, News

 

© Kipper Williams @Procartoonists.org

Above: with the Duchamp in Herne Bay festivities now behind us, there’s just room for this cartoon by Kipper Williams – featuring the names of participating cartoonists, many of whom are among our membership. The original is hanging in a gallery space in the Kent seaside town, as part of an exhibition of art cartoons to tie in with the celebrations.

Alexander Matthews, a cartoonist for The Beano and member of Procartoonists.org, has started a campaign to improve the quality of children’s comics by making them more reliant on great content and less on cover-mounted freebies. He is suggesting a change to the way in which free gifts are treated under VAT rules, and is seeking support for the campaign – which he believes would benefit comic fans and cash-strapped parents alike. Read more on Alex’s blog.

Another PCO member, Tony Husband, has had cartoons about his father’s dementia tweeted to millions, courtesy of Stephen Fry. See the cartoons here, here and here. Fry also wrote the introduction for I Nearly Died Laughing, a collection of Tony’s gag cartoons that was published last year.

Looking ahead to October, Sue Grayson Ford of The Campaign for Drawing writes about what to expect from this year’s Big Draw, and how to take part.

In an interview for Truthout, political cartoonist Matt Bors discusses his influences, the dangers of on-spec work, and the value of comics journalism. Read it here.

And finally, The New Yorker’s Bob Mankoff looks at what is often considered to be one of the hardest forms of cartoon to master: the captionless gag.

The Round-up

June 21, 2013 in General, Links, News

 

Tim Harries (right) signs one of his cartoon collections @Procartoonists.org

Tim Harries, a member of Procartoonists.org and creator of the long-running comic strip Never Say Dai, was special guest at a cartooning and comic book fair in Newport last Saturday. Read more about the event here.

Two recently posted video clips see New Yorker cartoonist Matthew Diffee discussing the element of design in gag cartoons, and the need to overcome rejection and generate ideas. Shortly after his presentation, Diffee also sat down for an interview with Forbes.

Head over to BBC iPlayer to learn more about the history and longevity of that notorious subversive, Mr Punch, in a half-hour programme from Radio 4 Extra.

A one-minute anti-war animation one-minute has been rediscovered, in which (an unauthorised) Mickey Mouse meets his fate in Vietnam. Watch the cartoon and read more at Cartoon Brew.

Finally, a pair of broadcast experts – veterans of Aardman Animations and the BBC – are looking to invest in new creative ideas. Read more here.

That’s the way to do it - Ed.

The Round-up

June 1, 2013 in Events, General, Links, News

© The Surreal McCoy @Procartoonists.org

New Yorker cartoonist Liza Donnelly has curated an exhibition of work by international cartoonists on the subject of women’s rights – including the cartoon above by one of our members, The Surreal McCoy. Donnelly explains the project here.

Speaking at this year’s Hay Festival, Sir Quentin Blake has said that illustrations are vital in getting young children onto the path of reading for enjoyment. Read his argument here.

In July, Brighton will play host to an unusual conference that spans both comics and healthcare. downthetubes has more.

Across two blog posts, New Yorker cartoon editor Bob Mankoff publishes imaginary inventions, as devised by his cartoonists. Explore them in Part 1 and Part 2.

Finally, comics expert Paul Gravett reports on Sequential, a new app for the iPad that is making graphic novels accessible in digital format – including, in the first round of releases, the recently-launched compendium of work by Procartoonists.org member Hunt Emerson. Read Gravett’s article for more information.

The Round-up

February 8, 2013 in General, Links, News

© Kevin Siers for The Charlotte Observer @Procartoonists.org

Kevin Siers, editorial cartoonist for The Charlotte Observer, has found his name on a list of hostiles kept by the National Rifle Association. Read Siers’ response here.

Mike Lynch tells an amusing story – through the medium of cartoons, naturally – about his early attempts to sell gags to that most notoriously esoteric of markets, The New Yorker. Read The Petty Indignities That Ruin My Life here.

Elsewhere, New Yorker cartoonists have been trying out an Etch A Sketch app – with decidedly mixed results. The experiment was so disastrous for Mick Stevens that it resulted in him speaking out against all forms of digital drawing. Read more, and see their attempts, here.

Lafayette, Louisiana newspaper The Advertiser provides a full and comprehensive answer to a reader’s question about how political cartoons are selected (be sure to click through to page 2 for the full response).

And finally, for those with an interest in animation, Complex.com has compiled a list of 25 cartoons that aren’t for children.

The Round-up

January 28, 2013 in General, Links, News

© Graeme Bandeira @Procartoonists.org

Procartoonists.org member Graeme Bandeira is one of a group of artists who will feature in the Fantasista 2013 Exhibition of football illustration this spring. Alongside Graeme’s caricature of Ryan Giggs (above), you can also find his depiction of José Mourinho at the Telegraph site.

Libby Purves, Procartoonists.org patron and cartoon fanatic, will be interviewing Private Eye editor Ian Hislop at a special event for the Royal Geographical Society on 27 February. Read more and book tickets here.

Bob Mankoff, the cartoon editor at The New Yorker, shows us how his own health fears have found their way into his gag cartoons.

The Association of American Editorial Cartoonists has issued a statement condemning plagiarism and supporting originality. Meanwhile, US cartoonist Bill Day has been accused of self-plagiarism.

And finally, two editorial cartoonists – Matt Wuerker and Scott Stantis – speak to NPR about their depictions of Barack Obama as he starts his second presidential term. Listen to the interview here.

The Round-up

November 24, 2012 in General, Links, News

© Dave Walker @Procartoonists.org

Dave Walker, regular contributor to Church Times and a member of Procartoonists.org, produced the cartoon above for The Guardian this week, following the Church of England’s decision to reject the ordination of women bishops. Dave’s cartoon has attracted more than 100 comments, and counting.

Having moved into greeting card designs, Matthew Inman – the cartoonist behind US website The Oatmeal – is being sued for trademark infringement. Inman was involved in another legal rights battle earlier in the year, against online content aggregator FunnyJunk. In that instance, FunnyJunk had been using Oatmeal material without permission – but bizarrely issued a lawsuit against Inman. Refresh your memory by reading our coverage of the case.

Darren Davis, the man behind independent comics publisher Bluewater Productions, is embracing a move into digital publishing, but is finding another side of the internet – online criticism – hard to take.

The New Yorker has published its third annual ‘bookazine’ cartoon compilation. The New Yorker Cartoons of the Year 2012 features more than 250 of the best gags that have run in the magazine this year, along with new material. No word yet on whether it will be distributed outside the US, but previous editions have made their way to the UK courtesy of discerning stockists including the London Review Bookshop.

After Gin Lane: Giving it all away

September 6, 2012 in Comment, General

Following From Gin Lane to the Information Superhighway we see that there are cartoonists who are positively embracing this new era of social media and sharing.

Hairy Steve © Steve Bright @ Procartoonists.org

Webcomics and viral cartoons are a couple of the ways that you can effectively give your work away to the web but get paid back by other means. Successful webcomics work on a business model based on the idea that you give away a regularly updated cartoon on your website and build a following of readers who come back day after day. British examples include John Allison‘s Bad Machinery or Jamie Smart‘s Corporate Skull.

© Peter Steiner @ Procartoonists.org

The profit comes from selling merchandise to the more loyal fans – bound compilations, prints, sketches, T-shirts, toys and so forth. Similarly, viral cartoons can drive lots of new readers to your website. How much money can be directly attributed to virals is arguable, although, for example, the well-known New Yorker cartoon “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog” is said to have earned its creator, Peter Steiner, more than $50,000.

The website Kickstarter has recently become one of the biggest publishers of comic books in the USA, from independent cartoonists using the crowd-funding model to raise money directly from their fan-base. Here in the UK, Procartoonists.org‘s very own Adrian Teal (The Gin Lane Gazette) and Steve Bright (Hairy Steve – in collaboration with Jamie Smart) have developed their own crowd-funded projects.

We’ll be considering another aspect of the communication change – After Gin Laneand what it means for cartoonists next week