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The Round-up

July 15, 2013 in General, Links, News

Chris Burke in his studio © Anke @Procartoonists.org

Chris Burke, the widely published caricaturist and illustrator – and Procartoonists.org member – gives a local blog a tour of his home and studio in Royal Tunbridge Wells. Read the resulting feature interview, and see plenty of examples of Chris’ work,  here.

The Guardian has an interview with David Fickling and family – the tribe behind weekly comic The Phoenix – told in comic-strip format.

Charlie Paul, director of the Ralph Steadman documentary For No Good Reason, shares a short time-lapse film showing the Procartoonists.org member in action. (Brought to our attention by the Cartoon Museum – follow them on Twitter: @cartoonmuseumuk.)

Following a long-awaited British – or is that Scottish? – victory in the men’s singles event at Wimbledon, Andy Murray has been popping up in many a cartoon. He appears alongside his mother, Judy, in the 75th anniversary issue of The Beano; has been knighted courtesy of Procartoonist Andy Davey in The Sun; and was cynically adopted by the politicians, in cartoons by Christian Adams for The Telegraph and Peter Brookes for The Times.

The Round-up

January 4, 2013 in General, Links, News

© Gerald Scarfe @Procartoonists.org

Gerald Scarfe has revisited an old project by producing a new series of cartoons to illustrate the on-screen revival of Yes, Prime Minister. This drawing, above, of its stars David Haig and Henry Goodman, is also gracing billboards and bus shelters ahead of the show’s debut on the TV channel Gold on 15 January. Scarfe produced a memorable series of cartoons for the original Yes, Minister series. Those suffering from Thatcherite nostalgia can watch the original opening credits here.

Steve Bell guides us through a year of cartoons for The Guardian in this video (warning: contains expletives, contraceptives and bondage gear). Meanwhile, Peter Brookes selects the best from his own 2012 output for The Times (subscription required), and the Daily Mail’s Mac does the same here. Matt Buck (Hack) looks back at his own 2012 output here.

Dotter of Her Father’s Eyes, written by Mary Talbot and illustrated by her comics veteran husband, Bryan, has won the biography category of the 2012 Costa Book Awards – the first graphic novel to win in any of the five categories. Read more about the book, and what its success might mean for the medium more generally, here.

The weekly children’s comic The Phoenix has launched an app that allows readers to buy and download a digital version, and which includes free access to a sample “issue zero”.

And finally, Procartoonists.org patron Martin Wainwright brings us the story of an intriguing battle over intellectual property and the public domain.

The Round-up

December 14, 2012 in General, Links, News

© Axel Scheffler for Royal Mail @Procartoonists.org

Axel Scheffler, the illustrator best known for his work on the Gruffalo books, has produced the designs for Royal Mail’s Christmas stamps this year. Scheffler talks to the BBC about this latest commission, and looks back at his early work, in this short video.

After widespread publicity about falling sales and the decision to cease printing, The Dandy has now gone digital. Check out the first issue of the interactive web comic here.

Newsagent Des Barr requested 50,000 copies of the last print edition of The Dandy and has been selling them from a pop-up store in Glasgow, as well as via the internet. Somewhat ironically, sales have apparently been strong – read about it here, or buy a copy.

In related coverage, New Statesman looks at the UK children’s comic industry – from the online Dandy to The Phoenix and others – and finds it is in rude health. The article is one of several published as part of a week-long celebration of British comics by the magazine. Find the other pieces here.

As part of The Guardian’s coverage of the Edinburgh International Book Festival, illustrator in residence Chris Riddell writes that he has high hopes for the future of illustration in the digital realm.

And finally, Procartoonists.org member Royston Robertson has written an article for Sabotage Times in which he lists 10 cartoonists who have influenced him.

Round-up: What the Bloghorn saw

October 14, 2011 in News

Rob Murray writes:

Life magazine has compiled a diverse selection of wartime caricatures of Adolf Hitler, and points out that “in the right hands a pen, a paint brush, or a crude puppet can be an effective weapon.” You can see the slideshow here.

A new film has turned to animation to tell the story of the Green Revolution in Iran in 2009. Ali Samadi Ahadi’s The Green Wave animates written accounts that were posted on blogs and Twitter, to to tell the story of the uprising, along with mobile-phone footage posted online. The animation by Ali Reza Darvish provides a unique way of reconstructing a story that emerged via the web, as the regime blocked all media and brutally crushed the protests. For more on this, see: The Green Wave film website.

The Phoenix, a new weekly children’s comic due to launch in January, will feature a strip by The Dandy’s Etherington Brothers called Long Gone Don, as well as The Lost Boy by Kate Brown. The Phoenix is being launched by the former editor of short-lived comic The DFC, David Fickling, and has already announced new strips by Jamie Smart and by Daniel Hartwell and Neill Cameron.

Finally, a competition is offering a fan of The Beano a chance to star in a Dennis the Menace or Minnie the Minx strip, and to visit the comic’s Dundee office. See The Beano’s DC Thomson stablemate, The Courier, for more details.

The Bloghorn is made on behalf of the UK’s Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation

Round up : What the Bloghorn saw

July 16, 2011 in Comment, News

Rob Murray writes:

More details are emerging about The Phoenix, a new weekly comic from the former editor of the short-lived DFC that is due to launch in January. The Phoenix blog features an animated trailer for one of its strips, The Pirates of Pangaea by Daniel Hartwell and Neill Cameron, while its latest email newsletter provides this interactive teaser for a strip by Dandy cartoonist Jamie Smart.

Saudi Arabia’s lone female newspaper cartoonist, Hana Hajjar, tells CNN about the importance of her role in a male-led society and how her cartoons speak out for women. You can read the interview here (thanks to fellow cartoonist Lou McKeever for spotting the story).

In Malaysia, cartoonist Zunar has been unsuccessful in his attempt to lift a ban on two of his cartoon collections, according to news agency Bernama. Zunar was arrested in September under the country’s Sedition Act for publishing books considered ‘detrimental to public order’. An open letter from Chuah Siew Eng of Malaysia’s Centre for Independent Journalism calls the latest decision disappointing. Zunar intends to appeal.

Timed to coincide with the release of the final Harry Potter film, cartoonist Lucy Knisley has launched a humorous comic that condenses the entire series. Time Out Chicago has the full story, and Knisley’s blog features an incredibly detailed poster to download (but beware of spoilers!).

If there is something Bloghorn really shouldn’t really have missed please add it in the comments below. Thank you.

 

Rising from the ashes

March 18, 2011 in News

Remember the DFC, the short-lived subscription-only comic weekly? Well, it looks like it might be returningsort of.

Many of the DFC’s former artists and writers including Philip Pullman, Laura Howell, Gary Northfield, Garen Ewing, and the PCO‘s own Wilbur Dawbarn attended what may have been the launch party for The Phoenix in Oxford.

Although details are a little sketchy, it appears this isn’t strictly a re-launch but a new comic edited by the DFC’s former editor Ben Sharpe. Or, as Lew Stringer puts it in Blimey!

So, a new comic with the same editor as The DFC which held a party to announce the new comic, attended by many ex-DFC contributors, and allegedly also involving Will Fickling who was previously involved with The DFC. Other than that, not a revival of The DFC.

DFC or not, it appears that the new comic is expected to launch in early 2012. You get more information by signing up for their mailing list at www.thephoenixcomic.co.uk, or by following editor Ben Sharpe on Twitter.