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Cartoon coasts along for 30 years

June 7, 2011 in News

Postcard cartoon by Rupert Besley

Cartoons are inextricably linked to the seaside, so it was no surprise that when the new series of BBC Two’s Coast headed to Margate for a piece on the heyday of seaside landladies, they chose to illustrate that with a cartoon postcard.

Being very well looked after, detail above, by Rupert Besley, a member of the PCO, which runs the Bloghorn, was featured to illustrate the stereotype “battleaxe” and her endless lists of rules.

For Rupert, who has drawn hundreds of postcards, almost all for the holiday trade, national TV exposure was a mixed blessing, as the cartoon they chose was drawn more than 30 years ago. Rupert told the Bloghorn:

“If you’re lucky enough to get a cartoon taken up for use in a television programme, it does seem a bit mealy-mouthed then to start complaining about the one selected, given the choice available. But which would you rather have fill the screen, a recent cartoon that you were secretly quite pleased with or something done more than 30 years back, an early hamfisted attempt at a cartoon? Well, they said they’d pay me, so I won’t go on about it.”

Bloghorn will gloss over Rupert’s comments – the typical insecurity of the cartoonist! – and say it’s a great cartoon, perfectly illustrating the subject matter at hand.

You can see more seaside postcards in Margate in July, when a selection those digitised by the British Cartoon Archive goes on show. Bloghorn will have more on this nearer the time.

4 responses to Cartoon coasts along for 30 years

  1. Those Besley noses haven’t changed in 30 years.

  2. I still think that one’s a cracker, Rupert! And don’t forget to mention it in your DACS claim!

  3. Its the slightly upswept glasses on the bloke which do it for me. Rupert – in case you haven’t read it, I can recommend “Cream Teas, Traffic Jams and Sunburn. The Great British Holiday ” by Brian Viner. Your landlady’s in it. Several times.

  4. Many thanks, all, for kind words, much appreciated.

    Bed ‘n Breakfasts, eh. I think our worst (or maybe best) was some years back in Ireland, where I found the bottom sheet nailed to the wall. The bed sagged so badly that, after several hours of fitful sagging, I decided the only chance of sleep was to be had by decamping to the floor, which my wife had opted for a good deal earlier. I reckoned on taking the bedclothes with me. My quick tug at the sheets produced a loud tearing noise, enough to wake the landlady in the next room. Inspection by torch showed the sheet (now shredded) was tacked full length to the wall. I trust it was a fresh sheet at the start of the season.

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