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The Round-up

April 7, 2013 in General, Links, News

Above: The Gin Lane Gazette, produced by Procartoonists.org member Adrian Teal, has now hit the shops. The book receives an enthusiastic academic review here, showing that it’s not only a lot of fun, but also bang on target. Elsewhere, Ade explains how he went about crowd-funding the project.

Mike Barfield, the man behind Apparently in Private Eye, has also been working on a new book. Swat! A Fly’s Guide to Staying Alive is published on 16 April. In the meantime, you can read an interview with Mike here.

Cartoonist Simon Chadwick will be abseiling down the Spinnaker Tower in Portsmouth on 27 May to raise money for the Myositis Support Group. Simon has previously written and illustrated a children’s book, Teddy-Bo’s Feeling Tired, a copy of which is given to every child diagnosed with the condition. To sponsor Simon and support his abseil attempt, click here.

Rachel Cooke of The Observer describes a favourite cartoon by Tom Gauld, in a comment piece about the need to separate art from artist.

And finally, the comics artist Lew Stringer has launched a new blog. It focuses solely on his own work, old and new – unlike his previous venture, Blimey!, which became a Herculean task as he looked at the entire history of British comics. We say fair play to Lew (and, after all, Blimey! can still be seen here) and it’s always nice to see works in progress. Check it out.


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by Royston

Mike Barfield exhibition. Apparently

October 4, 2011 in Events

An exhibition of Apparently strips from Private Eye, by the cartoonist Mike Barfield, is being held at the City Screen Picturehouse, York.
Apparently by Mike Barfield

The free exhibition, of around 100 strips, opens tomorrow (October 5) and runs for a month.

On Sunday 23 October, Mike will be in the gallery from 1pm onwards selling original artwork — along with some of his music CDs. Bloghorn readers may remember that he wrote a World Cup song last year.

Mike will also be available to answer questions on anything you care to ask him, though he’s not hot on languages or geography. Apparently.
Apparently by Mike Barfield

The City Screen is at 13-17, Coney Street, York. Call 0871-902 5726. On November 4, Mike will talk about cartoons and writing, and will perform poems and songs at An Evening With Mike Barfield at the Millennium Hall, Helperby, near York. Tickets are £5. Call 01423-360 364

The Bloghorn is made on behalf of the UK’s Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation

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by Royston

Cartoonist's football song gets animated

June 14, 2010 in News

Cartoon by Patrick Blower
A football song created by the cartoonist Mike Barfield has been used as the soundtrack to a World Cup animation by another cartoonist, Patrick Blower.

As everyone seems to be releasing Eng-er-land football songs these days, it’s probably no surprise that there’s one by a cartoonist. But while most are all about flag-waving optimism, the song by Mike Barfield, who draws the strip Apparently in Private Eye, is a little more down to earth.

Called Don’t Set Your Sights Too High, Mike’s ukulele ditty, recorded on a home computer, made it into the final of a World Cup song contest on Radio 5 Live last week. Mike described the song as “an antidote to all the bombastic, triumphalistic swagger of pretty much every World Cup England song you’ve ever heard”.

Mike insists the song is realistic, rather than pessimistic – and bearing in mind the England team’s performance on Saturday, he may have a point – but in the end blind faith won and the song came second to one called, ahem, We Are The Rulers.

Now Mike’s song has been set to animation by Patrick Blower, a member of the PCO which runs the Bloghorn, and creator of the new Private Eye strip iBores. That’s a screen shot above, and you can see the full animation – and hear the song – here.

It’s part of Patrick’s Livedraw series which is featured on the Guardian’s Comment is Free website. The video seems to have attracted quite a few vitriolic comments (is there any other type on the internet?) though in fairness to the cartoonists concerned, that’s more to do with the Guardian’s decision to use the headline “Celebrating the British way”, rather than English. Still, it’s one way to get a debate going.