You are browsing the archive for Bob Mankoff.

The Round-up

April 12, 2013 in General, Links, News

© Ed Fisher/Cartoon Bank @Procartoonists.org

Cartoon captions are a major theme in this week’s Round-up. Bob Mankoff, cartoon editor of The New Yorker, looks back at the work of Ed Fisher (including the excellent meta-cartoon above), and also recalls some of the best caption contest entries by Roger Ebert. Both Ebert and Fisher passed away recently.

Over at The Telegraph, editorial cartoonist Christian Adams has unveiled his first caption competition, and is offering the original artwork as a prize for the best suggestion. Each contest will be topical, and this week’s features the late Baroness Thatcher. Head over to his blog to enter.

Unsurprisingly, Thatcher has been the subject of many cartoons in the past week or so. Gerald Scarfe, a cartoonist famous for his savage depictions of the former PM, talks about his relationship to his subject in this Q&A for the BBC. Elsewhere, David Ziggy Greene posts a piece he wrote and drew for French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo back in 2010. Read it here.

One of our members, the delightfully talented Gabriel Alborozo, has launched a new project. Simple Pleasures celebrates those small moments in life that make everything a little better. Alongside his own ideas, Gabe is taking suggestions from visitors to the site. You can also follow the project.

A new documentary film, Dear Mr. Watterson, celebrates the world of Calvin and Hobbes, while the strip’s creator, Bill Watterson, is also discussed in this article from Salon which argues that we should all respect the great man’s privacy.

The Round-up

January 28, 2013 in General, Links, News

© Graeme Bandeira @Procartoonists.org

Procartoonists.org member Graeme Bandeira is one of a group of artists who will feature in the Fantasista 2013 Exhibition of football illustration this spring. Alongside Graeme’s caricature of Ryan Giggs (above), you can also find his depiction of José Mourinho at the Telegraph site.

Libby Purves, Procartoonists.org patron and cartoon fanatic, will be interviewing Private Eye editor Ian Hislop at a special event for the Royal Geographical Society on 27 February. Read more and book tickets here.

Bob Mankoff, the cartoon editor at The New Yorker, shows us how his own health fears have found their way into his gag cartoons.

The Association of American Editorial Cartoonists has issued a statement condemning plagiarism and supporting originality. Meanwhile, US cartoonist Bill Day has been accused of self-plagiarism.

And finally, two editorial cartoonists – Matt Wuerker and Scott Stantis – speak to NPR about their depictions of Barack Obama as he starts his second presidential term. Listen to the interview here.

The Round-up

October 12, 2012 in General, Links, News

Ralph Steadman – the acclaimed cartoonist, Hunter S. Thompson collaborator and member of Procartoonists.org – is the subject of a new documentary film, which premieres at the BFI London Film Festival this evening. Watch the trailer of For No Good Reason, above, and read more about the film courtesy of Empire magazine.

Sticking with cinema, Charles Schulz‘s Peanuts characters are set to celebrate their 65th anniversary in 2015 by appearing in a new feature film.

Christian Adams of The Telegraph writes about the challenges that can arise for a topical cartoonist tackling daily newspaper deadlines, and reveals a cartoon that didn’t make it into print this week. Read the blog post here.

And finally, some entertaining pieces by New Yorker cartoon editor Bob Mankoff. In one, he looks at the importance of writing to the gag cartooning process, and Peter Steiner pitches in with his thoughts on making the transition from cartoonist to novelist. In another post, Mankoff offers some statistical advice to help you win the magazine’s caption contest.

The Round-up

September 14, 2012 in General, Links, News

© Mick Stevens/The New Yorker @ Procartoonists.org

A recent New Yorker cartoon by Mick Stevens, above, led to a temporary ban on the magazine’s Facebook page this week, because it apparently broke the social network’s decency rules. Bob Mankoff, the New Yorker’s cartoon editor, looks in detail at the supposed offence on his blog.

The latest collection of Punch artwork focuses on the full-colour, and often full-page, cartoons, illustrations and caricatures that graced the magazine’s pages throughout the 20th century. The Best of Punch Cartoons in Colour also features a large number of cover illustrations and artist biographies, and includes work by FougasseE H Shepard, Trog, Quentin Blake, Norman Thelwell and Procartoonists.org member Mike Williams, among many others.  See more here.

Kevin Kallaugher, political cartoonist for The Economist under his pen name KAL, provides an interesting overview of how his depictions of US leaders have changed as they have been weathered by their time in office (for similar insights from other cartoonists, see last week’s Round-up).

And finally, Forbidden Planet responds to a BBC report about the decline in reading among children, by calling on adults to help create new comic readers.

 

 

The Round-up

July 27, 2012 in General, Links, News

© Tom Humberstone @Procartoonists.org

As the 2012 Olympics get under way here in the UK, a piece of comics journalism by the cartoonist Tom Humberstone considers the negative impact that an event of this size can have on the host nation. Read the strip here.

New Olympics-themed works by Banksy have presented the London authorities with a dilemma. Meanwhile, The New Yorker offers a slideshow of its best Olympics gags.

Sticking with The New Yorker, a three-part blog entry by the cartoon editor Bob Mankoff takes a look back at a classic episode of Seinfeld – in which the characters struggle to “get” the magazine’s cartoons – to consider what’s funny and why. Read part one, part two and part three.

Terry Gilliam‘s daughter Holly is archiving her father’s work online, and has already unearthed some visual gems. Take a look here, and revisit for more treats as they are added.

As ever, please post any comments below.

© John Roberts @ Procartoonists.org

The Round-up

June 23, 2012 in General, Links, News

The final instalment of Life In Hell, © Matt Groening

Life In Hell, the long-running syndicated comic strip that first made a name for Simpsons creator Matt Groening, has come to an end after 32 years and a total of 1,669 installments. Read more about the strip and Groening’s decision to call time on it here, here or here.

A little under a year after his hands were broken in an assault by members of the Assad regime, the Syrian cartoonist Ali Ferzat is drawing again and appears in this moving video on The Guardian site.

In a piece for his New Yorker blog, cartoon editor Bob Mankoff looks at some of the seemingly innocuous cartoons published by the magazine that have nevertheless succeeded in causing offence.

The Mankoff post includes a case in which a cartoon was both attacked and defended on Facebook. Elsewhere on the social networking site, Procartoonists.org member Clive Goddard has discovered that one of his cartoons has drawn thousands of ‘likes’ and dozens of comments – check out the responses (and more importantly, the cartoon) here.

 

 

The Round-Up

June 1, 2012 in General, Links, News

© Alexander Matthews and Wilbur Dawbarn / The Phoenix

Alexander Matthews and Wilbur Dawbarn, both Procartoonists.org members and known for gag cartoons as well as comic strips, are collaborating on “Useleus”, a new series for the weekly comic The Phoenix. Alex writes the strip, while Wilbur provides the artwork, above. The strip will tell the story of “by far the most rubbishest warrior in all of Ancient Greece”. You can find out more here. Meanwhile, Alex is also working on a new strip for the Dandy, called “Grrrls!”, as alluded to on his blog.

Vanity Fair conducts an interview with Bob Mankoff, cartoon editor of The New Yorker, about that most prevalent of cartoon cliches:  the desert island.

Tom Richmond, cartoonist for MAD Magazine, has been awarded the top honour of Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year at the Reuben Awards. Read more here.

And finally, don’t make him angry, it’s his birthday. Time magazine looks back at 50 years of the Incredible Hulk in this slideshow.

 

The Round-up

May 11, 2012 in General, Links, News

© Martin Rowson

The Iranian cartoonist Mahmoud Shokraye has been sentenced to 25 lashes after an MP took offence at a caricature. The Guardian has more on the story here, and fellow cartoonists, including Procartoonists.org members Martin Rowson, above, and Clive Collins, have reacted with pictures of their own.

Bob Mankoff, cartoon editor at The New Yorker, has written a very entertaining blog post looking at the creative process as depicted in cartoons. He also writes about the need for magazine cartoonists to be constant innovators, and the piece is illustrated throughout by choice New Yorker gags. Enjoy it here.

The Pittsbugh Post-Gazette writes about “rage comics”, a growing trend in internet humour whereby amateur cartoonists vent their frustrations in order to make others laugh. Read more here.

Following the sad death of the writer and illustrator Maurice Sendak earlier this week, Forbidden Planet collects several fitting tributes and other comic creators pay their respects.

And finally, Daily Cartoonist looks back 258 years to what is considered the first example of an American editorial cartoon.

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by Royston

A Monday Round-up

April 16, 2012 in News

"Is there any news of the Iceberg?" © Bill Tidy

You may have noticed a lack of blog posts last week, this was caused by various changes going on behind the scenes to this website. To make it up to you, we offer an early round-up of cartooning links this week, as later we’ll be concentrating on this week’s Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival (April 19-22).

First up, you may have noticed that it’s 100 years since a certain large boat sank, and if you’ve not had enough of the excessive media coverage, here’s Bob Mankoff of the New Yorker on The world’s largest comedy cliche. We also revisit the definitive cartoon on the subject, above, originally in Punch in 1968, by the Procartoonists.org patron Bill Tidy.

Still on matters New Yorker, Liza Donnelly has transcribed one of her talks so you can read it on her blog: Word and image: The art of cartooning. And Carolita Johnson outlines her somewhat unusual career trajectory for the women’s website The Hairpin inHow to become a cartoonist in about 20 jobs.

Robert Crumb continues to be lauded by the art establishment in France, where he lives, and talks to AP about how odd he still finds it to see his art on walls in galleries. And talking of Art with a capital A, Charles Saatchi has his eye on a cartoonist.

Here’s something of which we were aware, from the AOI’s magazine, Varoom, but we hadn’t realised was now online. It’s a great read too. Martin Colyer, design director at Reader’s Digest, talks to cartoonists John CuneoSteve Way and Tom Gauld aboutThe process of cartoons.

Mark “Andertoons” Anderson does a bit of soul-searching on his blog and tells us Why I’m a cartoonist.

The popular DC Thomson comic strip The Numskulls is 50 years old, so comics artist Lew Stringer looks at how this story of little people in our heads fascinates and considers its many imitators, in Variations on a small theme.

The little people in my head tell me that’s enough links to be going on with. Expect Shrewsburyness tomorrow.

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by Royston

Remember the first time?

March 6, 2012 in General, News

Bob Mankoff illustration

Bob Mankoff, cartoon editor at The New Yorker, has invited several established cartoonists to talk about their first gags that hit the mark at the magazine.

First up was Mick Stevens, followed by Jack Ziegler. Both are now considered to be part of the “old or at least oldish guard now”, says Mankoff on his New Yorker blog, but they were new once. First-time memories from the cartoonists Roz Chast and Michael Maslin will follow.

Mankoff himself told the story of how he broke through as a cartoonist at the magazine in three parts here, here, and here in 2010. 

Cartoon by Bob Mankoff