You are browsing the archive for gag cartoons.

by Royston

Joke cartoons show opens

January 27, 2010 in General

pak_joking

The Only Joking! exhibition, a collection of gag cartoons old and new, opened at the Cartoon Museum in London today (Jan 27).

The show is designed to raise spirits in the deep winter with a few much-needed hearty chuckles, though when PCOer Martin Honeysett attended the private view yesterday he found that many people were clearly at home nursing winter colds (like this Bloghorn writer!)

Martin said: “I suppose the sparcity of cartoonists in the pub beforehand should have indicated the smallness of the throng attending. Never mind, all the better to get a good view of the fine work on display, extolling the virtues of this form of comic art and the lack of current appreciation.

“It’s a nice mix of old and new and an opportunity to see some gems from the museum collection. Well worth a visit.”

So, sup up your Lemsip (other cold remedies are available) and get down to the Cartoon Museum in Little Russell Street before the exhibition ends on March 1. For more details visit the website.

by Royston

Joke cartoons to lift the winter blues

January 11, 2010 in General

pak_joking An exhibition entitled Only Joking! is at the Cartoon Museum, London, from January 27 until March 1. The show is billed as a collection of joke cartoons old and new designed to raise spirits in the deep winter. Meanwhile, you have until January 24 to catch 30 Years of Viz at the museum. For more, visit the website.

by Royston

Oldie cartoon book and exhibition

September 29, 2009 in General

oldie_cartoons“Many readers would not admit it but the first thing they do with a magazine like The Oldie is to flick through it to look at the cartoons. If that is true, as I think it is, then the cartoons assume enormous importance.”

Richard Ingrams, editor of The Oldie, and former editor of Private Eye, in an intro to The Oldie Book of Cartoons 1992-2009

Read the full piece here

The Oldie is hosting an exhibition at London’s Cartoon Museum from this Thursday, October 1, until December 24, 2009. A selection of cartoons from the new book will be on display.

You can also buy more than 100 original cartoons just around the corner at Abbott and Holder Ltd on Museum Street. See them online here

by Royston

Prospect magazine profiles cartoonists and launches new strip

June 8, 2009 in General

stephencollins
Helping mammon soften his image, by Stephen Collins

The Prospect magazine blog continues its Cartoonist of the Month series by firing questions at PCOer Alex Matthews. You can also read interviews on the bog with Nick Downes and Clive Goddard.

Meanwhile, the magazine has also announced a new regular cartoon strip, excerpt above, drawn by Times cartoonist and Cartoon Art Trust award winner Stephen Collins.

by Royston

Cartoonist Les Barton dies

October 22, 2008 in General

Les Barton, a fine cartoonist who worked in both the gag cartoons and the comics markets, has died. He was as well known for cartoons in magazines such as Punch as for his comic work, including the much-loved “I Spy” in Sparky.

Born in 1923, he began selling cartoons in the 1940s and was a long-standing member of the Cartoonists’ Club of Great Britain, attending its inaugural meeting in 1960.

Cartoonist and blogger Lew Stringer has more on the comics work of Les Barton.
UPDATED: 26th November 2008. Full obituary written by Dr Mark Bryant from The Independent newspaper.

The PCO: Great British cartoon talent

by Royston

How to publish a cartoon book

October 8, 2008 in General

PCOer Gerard Whyman on how cartoonists can use the internet to bypass traditional publishers

This month sees my publishing debut: a 112-page cartoon compilation book entitled Oddly Distracted – a collection of nearly 190 cartoons of my best published and unpublished work. The book was edited, designed, produced and published entirely by myself using a PC and Lulu.com, the world’s largest self-publishing website.

Gerard Whyman’s new book. Click the image to enlarge

I hadn’t realised until recently that next year marks my 15th year in the cartooning business – being first published in 1994 – and so this book is a timely marker of that fact. Not that it was the prime motivator – I was inspired by seeing Tim Harries’ excellent self-published cartoon books last year and decided to have a go myself. Another factor was that Tim gave me free copies of his book with the promise that I give him one of mine when it was done. Twelve months on and I’ve managed to keep my side of the bargain.

Lulu is a “print-on-demand” service which means that books are only printed when ordered. The beauty of this system is that there is no minimum print run – you can just have one copy of book if you wish. So, with no storage costs, the process is cheap; there are no set up costs and the only investment is your time and energy. You must, however, be computer literate to be able to produce a printable book. I bought an optional distribution deal with Lulu for £79.95 which gave me an ISBN number and the availability of my book to online stores like Amazon which opens up a huge market.

The process of creating the book turned out to be a bit tricky and frustrating at times. Figuring out the software to lay out the pages was one thing – it took a while to master the Page Plus package – but using Lulu’s rather complex website was quite another. It doesn’t help if you’re like me and wade straight in without reading the small print closely. One error was to initially make the book 7.5”x 7.5” square, a size ineligible for the distribution deal I had bought with them. So I had to start from scratch and redesigned the book to a crown quarto format.

Financial Adviser, from Gerard Whyman’s book. Click to enlarge

The cartoon pages are loosely themed – there are ones on couples with troubles, business, and entertainment, among many other topics. There is work that has been published in The Spectator, The Oldie and Reader’s Digest and there are several full page cartoons that were originally printed in Punch. There is also a large contingent of my favourite unpublished gags.

I’m very pleased with the way has book has finally turned out. The print quality is first class and really does justice to the original drawings. Of course, the hardest part now is to convince the buying public to part with their hard-earned cash for my product – not easy in these difficult times.

Oddly Distracted is priced £7.95. You can see a preview of Gerard’s book and order copies by clicking this link

The PCO: Great British cartoon talent

by Royston

It's all about presentation

August 27, 2008 in News

It’s something all cartoonists dread: you open up a magazine and see one of your precious works in print but they have done something to it.

It may be a changed caption, an amended drawing, the cartoon has been printed too small … whatever, it’s a bit annoying. Here, cartoonist and blogger Mike Lynch takes a US magazine to task for printing captions over the drawing!

Talking of presentation, it’s a no-brainer for a department store to turn to a local celebrity when looking to publicise the opening of a new branch. So hats off to Harvey Nicks for their choice when opening a store in Bristol:


Don’t they look lovely? The BBC News website has the story

The PCO: British cartoon talent

by Royston

The Cartoonists' Olympics

August 13, 2008 in General


Bored with the Beijing Olympics already? Don’t worry, there’s always the Cartoonists’ Olympics.

At least there is in the mind of the New Yorker cartoonist Mick Stevens. He imagines what the 2008 Magazine Cartoonists’ Olympic Games would be like on his aptly named blog I really should be drawing.

Events include: The Reject-Toss (see above) in which contestants toss crumpled-up balls of paper containing unsuccessful ideas across a large room, attempting to hit a small wastebasket on the other side; and Drawing-Table Tennis, which involves two cartoonists batting ideas back and forth across a drawing table until the ideas become completely unrecognizable and devoid of humour.

Any cartoonists wishing to take part in these Olympics, please note: caffeine is a banned substance.

The PCO: British cartoon talent