You are browsing the archive for Gerard Whyman.

by Royston

Bloghorn victorious in Battle

September 14, 2009 in General

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After several years as the plucky underdog, the Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation’s team, this year rebranded as Team Bloghorn, has finally emerged victorious from the annual Battle of the Cartoonists.

Our team came joint first with Private Eye in the Big Draw event in which four teams completed a large banner on the theme of “Now We Are Ten”, celebrating a decade of The Campaign for Drawing. They faced stiff competition from teams from The Sun and The Independent.

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A banner year: The Bloghorn team was made up of, left to right, Andy Bunday, Clive Goddard, captain Pete Dredge, holding the cup, who oversaw proceedings, and Nathan Ariss

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Work in progress: Clive and Pete get drawing. Click here, to see the full, completed banner

In a post-match interview, Pete told the Bloghorn: “Justice and victory at last for the PCO’s Battle of the Cartoonists’ team, albeit jointly with the Eye (Shurely shome mistake – Ed). What seemed like a clear-cut decision was mysteriously drawn out into a “cheer-off” head-to-head. And even then our clearly louder decibel reading was insufficient for us to be declared outright winners. A big draw indeed!”

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Joint winners: The Private Eye team, left to right, Simon Pearsall, Richard Jolley and Ken Pyne, also a PCO member, with MC Andrew Marr, who is a patron of the PCO

But the event is not just about the glory of winning. PCO members Tim Harries, and Cathy Simpson were on hand to run drawing workshops for children and adults at the event, which took place at the Idea Generation gallery in Shoreditch, London.

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Drawn to it: Cathy Simpson hosted a workshop for children

The workshoppers were ably assisted by The Surreal McCoy. All photographs here are by Gerard Whyman, who was on hand as the official PCO photographer.

by Royston

Shrewsbury 2009 – the Humurals

April 29, 2009 in General

humurals

by Royston

How to publish a cartoon book

October 8, 2008 in General

PCOer Gerard Whyman on how cartoonists can use the internet to bypass traditional publishers

This month sees my publishing debut: a 112-page cartoon compilation book entitled Oddly Distracted – a collection of nearly 190 cartoons of my best published and unpublished work. The book was edited, designed, produced and published entirely by myself using a PC and Lulu.com, the world’s largest self-publishing website.

Gerard Whyman’s new book. Click the image to enlarge

I hadn’t realised until recently that next year marks my 15th year in the cartooning business – being first published in 1994 – and so this book is a timely marker of that fact. Not that it was the prime motivator – I was inspired by seeing Tim Harries’ excellent self-published cartoon books last year and decided to have a go myself. Another factor was that Tim gave me free copies of his book with the promise that I give him one of mine when it was done. Twelve months on and I’ve managed to keep my side of the bargain.

Lulu is a “print-on-demand” service which means that books are only printed when ordered. The beauty of this system is that there is no minimum print run – you can just have one copy of book if you wish. So, with no storage costs, the process is cheap; there are no set up costs and the only investment is your time and energy. You must, however, be computer literate to be able to produce a printable book. I bought an optional distribution deal with Lulu for £79.95 which gave me an ISBN number and the availability of my book to online stores like Amazon which opens up a huge market.

The process of creating the book turned out to be a bit tricky and frustrating at times. Figuring out the software to lay out the pages was one thing – it took a while to master the Page Plus package – but using Lulu’s rather complex website was quite another. It doesn’t help if you’re like me and wade straight in without reading the small print closely. One error was to initially make the book 7.5”x 7.5” square, a size ineligible for the distribution deal I had bought with them. So I had to start from scratch and redesigned the book to a crown quarto format.

Financial Adviser, from Gerard Whyman’s book. Click to enlarge

The cartoon pages are loosely themed – there are ones on couples with troubles, business, and entertainment, among many other topics. There is work that has been published in The Spectator, The Oldie and Reader’s Digest and there are several full page cartoons that were originally printed in Punch. There is also a large contingent of my favourite unpublished gags.

I’m very pleased with the way has book has finally turned out. The print quality is first class and really does justice to the original drawings. Of course, the hardest part now is to convince the buying public to part with their hard-earned cash for my product – not easy in these difficult times.

Oddly Distracted is priced £7.95. You can see a preview of Gerard’s book and order copies by clicking this link

The PCO: Great British cartoon talent

by Royston

Through the keyhole: a peek into the creative life

March 19, 2008 in General

People aspiring to work in creative areas, whether it be drawing cartoons, illustration, graphic design or writing novels, are always fascinated with how other people actually go about it. And, indeed, the usual questions – Where do you draw/write? What equipment do you use? etc – are often as fascinating to those already making a living in these areas.

The Guardian’s Saturday Review section has a regular feature in which we get to poke our noses into the studies and studios of well-known creative types, and what’s the betting that it’s the most widely read part of that high-brow supplement? But did you know there is a blog that provides the same facility?

It’s called On My Desk and features words and pictures from artists and other creative folk, letting us into their home studios and telling us how they work. You can search through the archive or upload your own details if you want to let others know how you do it. Several cartoonists can be found on there, including the PCO’s own Tim Harries and Gerard Whyman.

Have a nose round, it’s fun. It’s a bit like an online version of TV’s Through the Keyhole, so you won’t be able to resist the temptation to adopt a Loyd Grossman voice and whine “Who works in a house like thiiis …?”

British cartoon talent