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by Royston

The Round-up

March 19, 2014 in Events, General, Links, News

Boredom by Thomas Rowlandson

Boredom by Thomas Rowlandson @ Procartoonists.org

A new exhibition called The Long Nineteenth Century, which looks at British art from 1789 to 1918, opened at the Chris Beetles Gallery in London this week.

Many of those charting the huge changes in society over this period were cartoonists, of course, and the show features work by Gillray and Rowlandson, above, through to Tenniel and Heath Robinson. The exhibition runs until 12 April.

A study of 20th century satire, the Arena documentary Whatever Happened to Spitting Image?is to be broadcast on BBC Four tomorrow (20 March). See clips and more here. It ties in with the puppet show’s 30th anniversary celebrations.

Still on BBC Four documentaries with questioning titles, the Scottish comic book artist Frank Quitely has been profiled in What Do Artists Do All Day?, which you can watch now on iPlayer.

The organisers of the Melksham Comic Con in Wiltshire are looking to expand the event in 2014 and have turned to Kickstarter for help. They clearly had fun making this “charity appeal” for the non-profit event. The target is just £5,000 and they emphasise that every £1 counts.

Salmond and Cameron From The Auld Acquaintance © Scottish Cartoon Art Studio
From The Auld Acquaintance © Scottish Cartoon Art Studio


The Scottish Cartoon Art Studio is injecting some much-needed humour into the independence debate with an international touring exhibition called The Auld Acquaintance, above. Find out more here.

This year Finland is celebrating the centenary of the birth of Tove Jansson, creator of the Moomins. If you don’t know your Moominmamma from your Moominpappa, you can get up to speed with this article by Mark Bosworth.

Finally, as if last week’s Bananaman vs Stephen Hawking photo wasn’t enough for fans of the Dandy superhero, we now hear that there is a Bananaman film in the works, though so far all we have to go on is this teaser campaign. The Metro suggests five other TV cartoons that should follow it to the big screen.

After Gin Lane: Giving it all away

September 6, 2012 in Comment, General

Following From Gin Lane to the Information Superhighway we see that there are cartoonists who are positively embracing this new era of social media and sharing.

Hairy Steve © Steve Bright @ Procartoonists.org

Webcomics and viral cartoons are a couple of the ways that you can effectively give your work away to the web but get paid back by other means. Successful webcomics work on a business model based on the idea that you give away a regularly updated cartoon on your website and build a following of readers who come back day after day. British examples include John Allison‘s Bad Machinery or Jamie Smart‘s Corporate Skull.

© Peter Steiner @ Procartoonists.org

The profit comes from selling merchandise to the more loyal fans – bound compilations, prints, sketches, T-shirts, toys and so forth. Similarly, viral cartoons can drive lots of new readers to your website. How much money can be directly attributed to virals is arguable, although, for example, the well-known New Yorker cartoon “On the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog” is said to have earned its creator, Peter Steiner, more than $50,000.

The website Kickstarter has recently become one of the biggest publishers of comic books in the USA, from independent cartoonists using the crowd-funding model to raise money directly from their fan-base. Here in the UK, Procartoonists.org‘s very own Adrian Teal (The Gin Lane Gazette) and Steve Bright (Hairy Steve – in collaboration with Jamie Smart) have developed their own crowd-funded projects.

We’ll be considering another aspect of the communication change – After Gin Laneand what it means for cartoonists next week