You are browsing the archive for Peter Brookes.

The Round-up

April 28, 2013 in Events, General, Links, News

North Stand © Huw Aaron @Procartoonists.org

Kudos to Procartoonists.org member Huw Aaron, who was recently highly commended in the Cartoonist of the Year category of the 2013 Sports Journalism Awards for his rugby-themed strip, North Stand (the prize was eventually won by The Telegraph’s Matt Pritchett for his coverage of the London Olympics). Huw has also been busy with other projects, including producing stop-motion animations for S4C science programme Corff Cymru.

Following the recent publication of his Gin Lane Gazette, PCO member Adrian Teal has been leading guided tours of London.

Harry Venning, the cartoonist and comedy writer behind Clare in the Community, is opening up his Brighton studio for four weekends during May as part of the Brighton Festival. See the brochure to find out more about the Artists Open Houses event. Harry’s studio is at 93 Islingword Road.

Amazon has launched a new tool enabling cartoonists and comic creators to produce digital versions of their work for Kindle. Read more here.

Graphic journalist Dan Archer tells the BBC about how he uses comic strips to report on major political and social issues. Elsewhere, New Yorker cartoonist Liza Donnelly writes for Forbes about the importance of cartoons by women around the world.

Cartoonists and illustrators including Simon Tofield, Sir Quentin Blake and Peter Brookes are among the artists taking part in Gromit Unleashed, painting statues of the beloved Aardman dog for charity.

And finally, any cartoonist will appreciate the humour in this series of letters about rejection from Mad magazine.

If you come across a piece of cartooning news we might not have spotted, please let us know.

 

Heard the one about Twitter jokes?

February 13, 2013 in Comment, General

Procartoonists.org member Royston Robertson on the rise of Twitter jokes

“Everyone’s a comedian” is a phrase often uttered sarcastically, but with the rise of the Twitter joke it almost seems true.

If you’re not familiar with the phenomenon you need to be hanging around on Twitter when a major news story breaks. Recent stories such as the horsemeat scandal, the resignation of the Pope, and the unearthing of the body of Richard III, have provoked huge numbers of jokes (click those links to see some of them). Some are by those in the business of writing jokes but most are not.

Twitter cartoon by Royston Robertson

© Royston Robertson @ Procartoonists.org

Of course there are plenty of clunkers, and quite a few groaners, but a lot of them are really rather good. And it leads to a bit of a problem for cartoonists: how do you follow that?

It can be tricky to come up with new and original ideas, possibly to be seen a day – or several days – later, in an age when a colossal wave of jokes travels around the world as soon as a story breaks.

Well, the simple answer is that you just have to up your game. Of course, you can’t read every tweet to make sure your joke hasn’t been done, you just have to get on with it. Twitter is clearly here to stay, so there’s no point in complaining.

For political cartoonists, the problem is even more acute as people have taken to predicting on Twitter how the following days cartoons will turn out, most notably when the Richard III story broke on the same day that the MP Chris Huhne changed his plea to guilty.

As predicted by the Twitterati, some cartoonists did combine the two stories. But if it is done with enough skill and original thought, it’s clear that there is a big difference between a beautifully crafted cartoon and a 140-character quip.

Ultimately, what the trend for Twitter jokes tells us is that millions of people love to look at the world and all its problems through the prism of humour.

And that has to be good news for cartoonists.

Editor asks: Do you agree? Please tell us what you think in the comments.

The Round-up

January 4, 2013 in General, Links, News

© Gerald Scarfe @Procartoonists.org

Gerald Scarfe has revisited an old project by producing a new series of cartoons to illustrate the on-screen revival of Yes, Prime Minister. This drawing, above, of its stars David Haig and Henry Goodman, is also gracing billboards and bus shelters ahead of the show’s debut on the TV channel Gold on 15 January. Scarfe produced a memorable series of cartoons for the original Yes, Minister series. Those suffering from Thatcherite nostalgia can watch the original opening credits here.

Steve Bell guides us through a year of cartoons for The Guardian in this video (warning: contains expletives, contraceptives and bondage gear). Meanwhile, Peter Brookes selects the best from his own 2012 output for The Times (subscription required), and the Daily Mail’s Mac does the same here. Matt Buck (Hack) looks back at his own 2012 output here.

Dotter of Her Father’s Eyes, written by Mary Talbot and illustrated by her comics veteran husband, Bryan, has won the biography category of the 2012 Costa Book Awards – the first graphic novel to win in any of the five categories. Read more about the book, and what its success might mean for the medium more generally, here.

The weekly children’s comic The Phoenix has launched an app that allows readers to buy and download a digital version, and which includes free access to a sample “issue zero”.

And finally, Procartoonists.org patron Martin Wainwright brings us the story of an intriguing battle over intellectual property and the public domain.

by Royston

Cartoonists and illustrators on show

November 13, 2012 in Events, General, News

David Hockney by Jonathan Cusick

David Hockney by Jonathan Cusick (detail) @ Procartoonists.org

The cartoonists Peter Brookes, Matt Pritchett and Procartoonists.org member Jonathan Cusick, above, feature in The Illustrators, the annual winter show held at the Chris Beetles Gallery in St James’s, London.

Featuring 800 works from across three centuries, this year’s exhibition marks the bicentenaries of the births of both Charles Dickens and Edward Lear, with drawings and watercolours by close friends and collaborators. Later illustrations to a number of Dickens editions also feature.

The selling exhibition opens this Saturday (17 November) and runs until 5 January. For details on opening times visit chrisbeetles.com You can view a PDF of the show’s catalogue online here.

The Round-up

February 10, 2012 in Links

 

The big story in cartooning this week unfolded in the US, as a large number of editorial cartoonists took issue with The New York Times for soliciting cartoons on-spec (see No!Spec for useful background on this issue).

Aardman Animations, the studio behind Wallace and Gromit, has denied it is unhappy with comparisons between their hapless inventor character and Labour leader Ed Miliband in cartoons by Times cartoonist Peter Brookes. Responding to press reports that had claimed it was concerned about damage to its brand, Aardman said the cartoons are ‘great fun’. A piece in The Telegraph goes further, suggesting that Miliband should be flattered by the comparison.

When singer-songwriter Ryan Adams banned photography from his latest tour, the St. Louis Riverfront Times sent an illustrator along instead.

In Morocco, an 18-year-old has appeared in court after posting caricatures of King Mohammed VI on Facebook.

Royal Mail has unveiled a new set of Roald Dahl stamps, with illustrations by Quentin Blake.

And there’s more on the Cartoon Museum‘s alternative Jubilee show, Her Maj, as curator Anita O’Brien guides Culture24 though the exhibition.

by Royston

Hard Times at Chris Beetles Gallery

October 11, 2011 in Events

Peter Brookes Hard Times

"Tell me about your Big Society ..."

Hard Times, a new exhibition by the Times cartoonist Peter Brookes, opens at the Chris Beetles Gallery in St James’s, London, today and runs until November 5.

The selling show features more than 120 of Brookes’ most recent editorial cartoons from The Times, and ties in with the launch of his new book, also called Hard Times.

To see the exhibition online, go to www.chrisbeetles.com

The Bloghorn is made on behalf of the UK’s Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation

by Royston

Powerful stuff goes on display

September 1, 2011 in Events

Has Bambi got teeth? by Peter Brookes

Artwork from the political cartoon collection of Jeffrey Archer is to go on show for the first time, at the Monnow Valley Arts Centre, Herefordshire, from Saturday (September 3).

Image of Power will feature 100 cartoons owned by the writer and former Tory MP who has been collecting cartoons for 25 years. They include this early image of Tony Blair, Has Bambi got teeth?, by Peter Brookes of The Times.

The exhibition, which spans three centuries from Gillray to Scarfe, is being curated by the art collector Chris Beetles. It features images of Churchill, Macmillan, Kennedy, Reagan, Nixon, Thatcher and more.

Lord Archer says on his website: “I continue collecting, as there are still gaps to be filled, but it’s my long-term intention to produce an illustrated book on the collection, and to leave the works to the nation. Mind you, finding a home for them may not prove easy. “

The exhibition will be opened by Lord Archer on Saturday at 3pm and runs until October 30.

Cartooning in real-time

July 21, 2011 in Events, News

Response to printed and digital cartoons is now pretty much instant as this tweet about a drawing by Peter Brookes of The Times shows.

View Status

Peter’s colleague Morten Morland (a PCO member) had a swift response below

View Status

The standard response of editorial cartoonists to feedback like this is

View Status

Or complete silence, but when the controversy crosses the oceans in seconds to other influential commentators…

View Status

This speed of interaction between opinion, response and offence  pose, in Bloghorn’s view both a challenge and an opportunity to makers of drawings. What do you think cartoonists should do in the social media era?Answers welcome in the comments.

Updated: 2pm

View Status

Further response from the internet

Updated: Wednesday 27th JulyThe Guardian is reporting a letter from seven UK academics complaining about the publication of this cartoon. Read the story here and please comment below if you would like.

House of Illustration

November 25, 2010 in General, News

Illustration from The Very Hungry Caterpiller by Eric Carle

Cartoons and illustrations by some of the biggest names in the business are due to go under the hammer next month in support of the House of Illustration. The Sotheby’s auction, to be held on the 16th December, will feature work by Peter Brookes, Gerald Scarfe, Eric Carle (from children’s classic The Very Hungry Caterpiller), Beryl CookeRonald Searle and organiser Quentin Blake, amongst others. Some of the pieces up for grabs can be seen here.

The House of Illustration aiming to be the world’s first centre dedicated to the art of illustration, and has a site earmarked in the Kings Cross regeneration centre in central London.

Top spot for cartoons

September 3, 2010 in News

Blair cartoon from The Times by PCOer Morten Morland

The advent of statistics recording visits to web sites has allowed web publishers to see exactly which pages readers head for. Unsurprisingly, many have embraced this technology to show you – the reader – which pages are most popular.

So, I ask you to go to The Times website. Scroll down. No, you don’t have to get past the Great Pay Wall of Murdoch to do this – no small denomination payments are required. Look at the “Most Read” list of sections which are – as you might guess – the paper’s most popular click-through reads.

Of course, I don’t know when you’re reading this but I bet you that coming in the top three with a bullet will be “Cartoons”. I have checked assiduously for the past several weeks. “Cartoons” has been at or near the top spot for almost all of my visits (many times at Number One).

As I write, I am not chastened by the fact that nestling at number 2 is “Top Ten Chinos”.Well, a chap’s got to look the part while perusing the best of cartoon art online. Standards, you know. (Of course, if you want to actually look at the cartoons, you WILL have to pay at this point).

It’s a subject close to the hearts of us cartoonists. The popularity of The Times’ cartoons is, of course, not unrelated to the fact that they boast two fine cartoonists in Peter Brookes and Morten Morland, together with legend-inna-lifetime Gerald Scarfe at the Sunday title.

But it’s not just that. Readers love cartoons. We know that. It’s such a pity that this simple fact doesn’t prevent culls of cartoonists to cut costs at newspapers facing hard times. It seems counter-intuitive to us. For example the loss of almost all cartoon content from The Observer recently was mourned widely. So Bloghorn says hats off to the wildly good taste of Times readers.