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by Royston

Shooting Cartoonists at the Seaside

August 17, 2015 in Events, General, News

Shooting Cartoonists at the Seaside (Herne Bay) © David Cross

Shooting Cartoonists at the Seaside (Herne Bay), a watercolour © David Cross. Click image to enlarge

We’re grateful to David Cross for sending us this wonderful watercolour of cartoonists in action at the Herne Bay Cartoon Festival. Click the image to enlarge and see how many cartoonists, and other great details, you can spot.

David, who curated the Outrage! exhibition at the Seaside Gallery, called the painting Shooting Cartoonists at the Seaside (Herne Bay).

He explains: “I was around all day, mainly taking photos and noticing all the other heavy-camera guys snapping away like crazy. I sat at the drawing board the next day and put it together from photos and memory and some invention.”

The photographer pictured at the front is George Wilson, a recorder of Herne Bay’s social and cultural life since the 1960s.

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by Royston

Herne Bay: the exhibitions

August 9, 2015 in Events, General, News

Private view of the Lines in the Sand exhibition. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Private view of the Lines in the Sand exhibition. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Three exhibitions were held at the Herne Bay Cartoon Festival this year. Private views for two of those took place on 1 August, the day before the festival’s main live-drawing event. Photos by Kasia Kowalska and Gerard Whyman.

Photo © Gerard Whyman

Photo © Gerard Whyman

Photo © Kasia Kowalska

The Independent’s Dave Brown with his work. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Lines in the Sand, the main festival exhibition, featured work by more than 50 artists. There were cartoons on the subjects of seaside and surrealism, as is usual at Herne Bay, plus there was a room dedicated to cartoons on the fallout from the Charlie Hebdo massacre in January. The book Draw the Line Here was on sale at the exhibition.

There was even some drawing on the walls by the cartoonists. Here's Nathan Ariss and Tim Sanders in action. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

There were lines drawn on the wall at the Lines in the Sand viewing. Here are cartoonists Nathan Ariss and Tim Sanders in action. Photos © Kasia Kowalska

There was also a viewing of the exhibition in tribute to the late Martin Honeysett at the Bay Art Gallery. That was opened by Sir Roger Gale, the Herne Bay MP.

Sir Roger Gale, the town's MP, opened the exhibition of Martin Honeysett cartoons. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Sir Roger Gale opened the exhibition of Martin Honeysett cartoons. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

One of Honeysett's timelessly brilliant cartoons. Photo © Gerard Whyman

One of Honeysett’s timelessly brilliant cartoons. Photo © Gerard Whyman

Sir Roger Gale with Steve Coombes, one of the festival organisers, and Penny Precious, Martin Honeysett's widow, who curated the exhibition. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Sir Roger Gale with Steve Coombes, one of the festival organisers, and Penny Precious, Martin Honeysett’s widow, who curated the exhibition. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

On the previous evening there was a viewing of Outrage! A brief history of offensive cartoons, the third festival exhibition, held at the Seaside Museum. It featured work from the British Cartoon Archive in Canterbury. But there was also a never-before-seen Ralph Steadman, his response to the Charlie Hebdo massacre.

Steve Coombes at the Outrage! exhibition with Ralph Steadman's cartoon. Photo © Steve Coombes

Steve Coombes at the Outrage! exhibition with Ralph Steadman’s cartoon. Photo © Steve Coombes

As if all this wasn’t enough, for the first time this year the festival has a fringe exhibition! The One New Street gallery showed a small exhibition called Not Just Cartoons, featuring Glenn Marshall, Ingram Pinn and others.

Promotional mug at the One New Street Gallery, featuring Glenn Marshall. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

Promotional mug at the One New Street Gallery, featuring Glenn Marshall. Photo © Kasia Kowalska

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by Royston

Outrage! First Herne Bay Cartoon Festival exhibition opens

July 20, 2015 in Events, General, News

Outrage! A brief history of offensive cartoons -- poster

The exhibition Outrage! A brief history of offensive cartoons is now on at the Seaside Museum in Herne Bay, Kent, the first event in the third Herne Bay Cartoon Festival.

It includes works from the British Cartoon Archive in Canterbury and features David Low, the infamous Oz schoolkids’ edition, a cartoon Private Eye didn’t dare publish and a one that provoked a diplomatic incident. There is also a never-before-seen Ralph Steadman, his response to the Charlie Hebdo massacre, which is also a demonstration of the right to offend.

The museum is at 12 William Street, Herne Bay, open Tues-Sun, 10am-4pm. The show runs until 16 August.

The main festival exhibition, Lines in the Sand, will be held at Beach Creative from 28 July to 9 August. The gallery is in Beach Street and is open Tues-Sat 10am-4pm and Sun 11am-3pm.

There will also be an exhibition of cartoons by the late Martin Honeysett, who exhibited and appeared at the first two Herne Bay events. That will be at the Bay Art Gallery, William Street, from 28 July. The gallery is open Tues-Sun 10am-4pm.

The main day of live drawing at the Bandstand, featuring big boards, workshops, caricatures, and more, is Sunday 2 August, from 12pm-5pm. There will also be comic strip and cartoon workshops at Beach Creative on Saturday 1 August and at the Bandstand on the Sunday.

Jeremy Banx's poster for the Herne Bay Cartoon Festival, as seen in Private Eye

Jeremy Banx’s poster for the Herne Bay Cartoon Festival, as seen in Private Eye

The Herne Bay Cartoon Festival is sponsored by the Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation and and supported using public funding by Arts Council England.

We’ll have more nearer the time. You can see lots more coverage of the previous two events, including videos by David Good, in our Herne Bay archive.