You are browsing the archive for David Low.

Profile photo of Royston

by Royston

Outrage! First Herne Bay Cartoon Festival exhibition opens

July 20, 2015 in Events, General, News

Outrage! A brief history of offensive cartoons -- poster

The exhibition Outrage! A brief history of offensive cartoons is now on at the Seaside Museum in Herne Bay, Kent, the first event in the third Herne Bay Cartoon Festival.

It includes works from the British Cartoon Archive in Canterbury and features David Low, the infamous Oz schoolkids’ edition, a cartoon Private Eye didn’t dare publish and a one that provoked a diplomatic incident. There is also a never-before-seen Ralph Steadman, his response to the Charlie Hebdo massacre, which is also a demonstration of the right to offend.

The museum is at 12 William Street, Herne Bay, open Tues-Sun, 10am-4pm. The show runs until 16 August.

The main festival exhibition, Lines in the Sand, will be held at Beach Creative from 28 July to 9 August. The gallery is in Beach Street and is open Tues-Sat 10am-4pm and Sun 11am-3pm.

There will also be an exhibition of cartoons by the late Martin Honeysett, who exhibited and appeared at the first two Herne Bay events. That will be at the Bay Art Gallery, William Street, from 28 July. The gallery is open Tues-Sun 10am-4pm.

The main day of live drawing at the Bandstand, featuring big boards, workshops, caricatures, and more, is Sunday 2 August, from 12pm-5pm. There will also be comic strip and cartoon workshops at Beach Creative on Saturday 1 August and at the Bandstand on the Sunday.

Jeremy Banx's poster for the Herne Bay Cartoon Festival, as seen in Private Eye

Jeremy Banx’s poster for the Herne Bay Cartoon Festival, as seen in Private Eye

The Herne Bay Cartoon Festival is sponsored by the Professional Cartoonists’ Organisation and and supported using public funding by Arts Council England.

We’ll have more nearer the time. You can see lots more coverage of the previous two events, including videos by David Good, in our Herne Bay archive.

The Round-up

June 16, 2012 in General, Links, News

© Posy Simmonds

An exhibition dedicated to the work of Posy Simmonds, the creator of Tamara Drewe, has opened in Belgium. Forbidden Planet has further details here, and Paul Gravett, who co-curated the show with Simmonds, writes extensively about her life and work on his blog.

To coincide with the recent Jubilee celebrations, The Guardian looked back at a David Low cartoon published by the newspaper to widespread controversy 60 years ago. The paper observes that depictions of the Royal Family have changed dramatically since then. Read the article here. Forbidden Planet also looks at the Low cartoon, and the satire that came later, in this blog post.

Pieces of original cartoon artwork can fetch healthy sums at auction, as proven by the recent sales of these works by Hergé and Bill Watterson.

The first East London Comics and Arts Festival (ELCAF) takes place in Shoreditch this Sunday, June 17. The event will feature live drawing by established illustrators, panel discussions and interviews, portfolio critique sessions, and a free evening concert. See the website for more details. For a round-up of other dates for your diary, click here.

 

Profile photo of Royston

by Royston

101 reasons to visit Cartoon Museum

November 1, 2011 in Events

101 Cartoonists poster

An exhibition called One Hundred and One Cartoonists is at the Cartoon Museum in London from Thursday 3 November.

It features cartoons, comics and caricatures from the collection of Luke Gertler, who has been collecting original cartoon artwork for more than 50 years.

On display will be works by H.M. Bateman, Max Beerbohm, Giles, David Low, Donald McGill, Thomas Rowlandson, Ronald Searle, John Tenniel and Dudley D. Watkins, among many others.

Asked what drew him to the cartoons he chose for his collection of more than 800 images, Luke Gertler told the Cartoon Museum newsletter:

“With cartoons, it’s the picture I would buy, rather than the joke. I liked ones with people, with characters, and the style was very important to me. I preferred rather bold colour styles, firm outlines like in John Hassall, for instance. I liked also the cartoonists who drew in wonderful detail, like Thelwell and Heath Robinson.”

One Hundred and One Cartoonists runs until January 29. For more details, visit the Cartoon Museum website.

Cartooning on the Frontline

February 4, 2011 in News

Photograph: Antje Bormann

PCO member Martin Rowson delivered a talk on Caricatures and Commentary to the Frontline Club in London this week.

In discussion with Radio 4’s Laurie Taylor Martin spoke about subjects ranging from his caricatures of patrons at the Gay Hussar restaurant to the abolition of the Licensing Act in 1695 and taking in influences from William Hogarth, James Gillray and David Low on the way.

This was followed by a lively question and answer session where he fielded enquiries about how he deals with new political figures and the Danish Muhammed cartoons.

The talk can be seen in full (all one and a half hours of it) at the Frontline Club’s website.

Profile photo of Royston

by Royston

Cartoons on the radio

April 24, 2008 in General

Above: Low takes on Hitler and Mussolini. Click to enlarge

Cartoons were back in the spotlight this morning with an item on BBC Radio Four’s Today show about the David Low exhibition currently running at London’s Political Cartoon Gallery.

Tim Benson of the gallery appeared on the show to discuss the work with politicians Douglas Hurd and Ken Clarke. You can see a selection of the cartoons in an online gallery at the Today website.

The Best of Low is at the Political Cartoon Gallery until June 7. Low (1891–1963) is considered by many to be the greatest political cartoonist of the 20th Century. This exhibition of his work includes more than 60 original cartoons from before the First World War to the early 1960s. None of the cartoons on show have been exhibited before.

The Political Cartoon Gallery is at 32 Store Street, London WC1E 7BS, and is open Monday to Friday 9.30am – 5.30pm and on Saturdays between 11.30am – 5.30pm.

Click here for top British cartoonists that are still with us!

Profile photo of Royston

by Royston

Cartoon exhibition: The Best of Low

March 11, 2008 in General

Above: Low takes on Hitler and Mussolini

An exhibition showcasing the best of Sir David Low is at the Political Cartoon Gallery in London from April 23 until June 7.

Low (1891–1963) is considered by many to be the greatest political cartoonist of the 20th Century. This exhibition of his work includes more than 60 original cartoons from before the First World War to the early 1960s. None of the cartoons on show have been exhibited before and include a number that were censored before and during the Second World War.

Many of the originals on show include Low’s most famous creations Colonel Blimp and the TUC Carthorse. The exhibition will also coincide with the launch of a book entitled Low and the Dictators which features the almost private war Low fought against Hitler and Mussolini from the 1920s until the end of the Second World War.

The Political Cartoon Gallery is at 32 Store Street, London WC1E 7BS, and is open Monday to Friday 9.30am – 5.30pm and on Saturdays between 11.30am – 5.30pm.

British cartoon talent