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The Round-up

July 27, 2012 in General, Links, News

© Tom Humberstone @Procartoonists.org

As the 2012 Olympics get under way here in the UK, a piece of comics journalism by the cartoonist Tom Humberstone considers the negative impact that an event of this size can have on the host nation. Read the strip here.

New Olympics-themed works by Banksy have presented the London authorities with a dilemma. Meanwhile, The New Yorker offers a slideshow of its best Olympics gags.

Sticking with The New Yorker, a three-part blog entry by the cartoon editor Bob Mankoff takes a look back at a classic episode of Seinfeld – in which the characters struggle to “get” the magazine’s cartoons – to consider what’s funny and why. Read part one, part two and part three.

Terry Gilliam‘s daughter Holly is archiving her father’s work online, and has already unearthed some visual gems. Take a look here, and revisit for more treats as they are added.

As ever, please post any comments below.

© John Roberts @ Procartoonists.org

The Round-up

June 23, 2012 in General, Links, News

The final instalment of Life In Hell, © Matt Groening

Life In Hell, the long-running syndicated comic strip that first made a name for Simpsons creator Matt Groening, has come to an end after 32 years and a total of 1,669 installments. Read more about the strip and Groening’s decision to call time on it here, here or here.

A little under a year after his hands were broken in an assault by members of the Assad regime, the Syrian cartoonist Ali Ferzat is drawing again and appears in this moving video on The Guardian site.

In a piece for his New Yorker blog, cartoon editor Bob Mankoff looks at some of the seemingly innocuous cartoons published by the magazine that have nevertheless succeeded in causing offence.

The Mankoff post includes a case in which a cartoon was both attacked and defended on Facebook. Elsewhere on the social networking site, Procartoonists.org member Clive Goddard has discovered that one of his cartoons has drawn thousands of ‘likes’ and dozens of comments – check out the responses (and more importantly, the cartoon) here.

 

 

The Round-Up

June 1, 2012 in General, Links, News

© Alexander Matthews and Wilbur Dawbarn / The Phoenix

Alexander Matthews and Wilbur Dawbarn, both Procartoonists.org members and known for gag cartoons as well as comic strips, are collaborating on “Useleus”, a new series for the weekly comic The Phoenix. Alex writes the strip, while Wilbur provides the artwork, above. The strip will tell the story of “by far the most rubbishest warrior in all of Ancient Greece”. You can find out more here. Meanwhile, Alex is also working on a new strip for the Dandy, called “Grrrls!”, as alluded to on his blog.

Vanity Fair conducts an interview with Bob Mankoff, cartoon editor of The New Yorker, about that most prevalent of cartoon cliches:  the desert island.

Tom Richmond, cartoonist for MAD Magazine, has been awarded the top honour of Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year at the Reuben Awards. Read more here.

And finally, don’t make him angry, it’s his birthday. Time magazine looks back at 50 years of the Incredible Hulk in this slideshow.

 

by Royston

A Monday Round-up

April 16, 2012 in News

"Is there any news of the Iceberg?" © Bill Tidy

You may have noticed a lack of blog posts last week, this was caused by various changes going on behind the scenes to this website. To make it up to you, we offer an early round-up of cartooning links this week, as later we’ll be concentrating on this week’s Shrewsbury Cartoon Festival (April 19-22).

First up, you may have noticed that it’s 100 years since a certain large boat sank, and if you’ve not had enough of the excessive media coverage, here’s Bob Mankoff of the New Yorker on The world’s largest comedy cliche. We also revisit the definitive cartoon on the subject, above, originally in Punch in 1968, by the Procartoonists.org patron Bill Tidy.

Still on matters New Yorker, Liza Donnelly has transcribed one of her talks so you can read it on her blog: Word and image: The art of cartooning. And Carolita Johnson outlines her somewhat unusual career trajectory for the women’s website The Hairpin inHow to become a cartoonist in about 20 jobs.

Robert Crumb continues to be lauded by the art establishment in France, where he lives, and talks to AP about how odd he still finds it to see his art on walls in galleries. And talking of Art with a capital A, Charles Saatchi has his eye on a cartoonist.

Here’s something of which we were aware, from the AOI’s magazine, Varoom, but we hadn’t realised was now online. It’s a great read too. Martin Colyer, design director at Reader’s Digest, talks to cartoonists John CuneoSteve Way and Tom Gauld aboutThe process of cartoons.

Mark “Andertoons” Anderson does a bit of soul-searching on his blog and tells us Why I’m a cartoonist.

The popular DC Thomson comic strip The Numskulls is 50 years old, so comics artist Lew Stringer looks at how this story of little people in our heads fascinates and considers its many imitators, in Variations on a small theme.

The little people in my head tell me that’s enough links to be going on with. Expect Shrewsburyness tomorrow.

Round-up: What the Bloghorn saw

June 24, 2011 in Comment, News

Rob Murray writes:

Over at the New Yorker blogs, cartoon editor Bob Mankoff has been looking at what makes a good caption for a gag cartoon – and argues, contrary to popular opinion, that  novelty is overrated.

Following up, he considers whether it is possible to generate a universal caption that would work with all the cartoons featured in the magazine’s long-running caption contest, and asks readers to suggest their own. Mankoff  analysed some of these in a subsequent blog.

Five postcards by prolific cartoonist and master of the double entendre, Donald McGill, have gone on sale for the first time since being banned on obscenity grounds 56 years ago. The cards have been reprinted and sold by the  Donald McGill Postcard Museum on the Isle of Wight, and the Daily Mail has the full story  here.

Two months on from the royal wedding, Pippa Middleton is still making headlines – this time in cartoon form. The Duchess of Cambridge’s sister stars in a tongue-in-cheek comic strip, one of several released as part of the marketing campaign for video game Infamous 2.

A New York Times blog entry by historian Adam Goodheart deconstructs a cartoon that ran in Harper’s Weekly at the start of the American Civil War, and which later proved prophetic. It should make interesting reading for enthusiasts of both history and cartoons.

Meanwhile, in Russia, a new cartoon strip depicting prime minister Vladimir Putin and president Dmitry Medvedev as superheroes foiling a Speed-style bomb plot has become an internet hit. Creator Sergei Kalenik says he created the Superputin strip to change people’s depressing views of Russia’s political scene. You can read the strip in English translation here.

Bloghorn adds if you see something we should know, please tell us.

 

Round-up:What the Bloghorn saw

June 3, 2011 in News

Rob Murray writes:

The Telegraph‘s Hay Festival coverage includes an interview with the paper’s own longstanding pocket cartoonist, Matt Pritchett, in which he talks about how he got started, his typical work process and the challenges of producing a daily cartoon. You can read the entire piece here.

Elsewhere, New Yorker cartoonist Bruce Eric Kaplan (BEK) has shared an excerpt from his illustrated story about a man trying to come up with the perfect graduation speech. The picture book – like most BEK cartoons – combines concise, dark writing with sparse line drawings, and can be sampled on the Huffington Post blog.

Another New Yorker contributor, the self-effacing cartoonist and illustrator Ivan Brunetti, is profiled by the Chicago Tribune here.

Meanwhile, the Wall Street Journal reports on an embarassing situation for German newspaper Die Zeit that should serve as a reminder to all topical and political cartoonists – namely, keep track of who’s in charge.

 

What happened next…

September 2, 2010 in Events, News

Foghorn Bloghorn for The UK Professional Cartoonists’ OrganisationA quick follow-up of stories we’ve covered recently on Bloghorn.

by Royston

Prospect profiles Aussie cartoonist

July 16, 2009 in General

5-7
The new Cartoonist of the Month over at Prospect magazine’s First Drafts blog is Australian Glen Le Lievre. And very funny it is too, both the cartoons and his responses to the questions.

Cartoon Pick of the Week

August 15, 2008 in Links, News


Bloghorn spotted this great work this week…

One:
Jack Ziegler in the New Yorker – on superpowered rivalry.

Two:
Mike Turner in the Spectator – ‘What’s up with you? Never seen anyone enjoying themselves before?’

Three:
Steve Bell in The Guardian on the UK’s North-South divide

British cartoon talent

by Royston

The Cartoonists' Olympics

August 13, 2008 in General


Bored with the Beijing Olympics already? Don’t worry, there’s always the Cartoonists’ Olympics.

At least there is in the mind of the New Yorker cartoonist Mick Stevens. He imagines what the 2008 Magazine Cartoonists’ Olympic Games would be like on his aptly named blog I really should be drawing.

Events include: The Reject-Toss (see above) in which contestants toss crumpled-up balls of paper containing unsuccessful ideas across a large room, attempting to hit a small wastebasket on the other side; and Drawing-Table Tennis, which involves two cartoonists batting ideas back and forth across a drawing table until the ideas become completely unrecognizable and devoid of humour.

Any cartoonists wishing to take part in these Olympics, please note: caffeine is a banned substance.

The PCO: British cartoon talent