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PCO Cartoon Review of 2017

January 1, 2018 in Comment, General, News

 

Everyone else is doing it so we thought we’d have our own look back at the year…with cartoons by PCO members. The Big Issue drawing above by Andrew Birch manages to fit the whole year into just one cartoon!

© Ralph Steadman

We started the year with Trump’s bigly attended inauguration. Trump was undoubtedly (Mad) Man of the Year although he was closely followed by Kim Jong-Range Missile. This flattering portrait of Trump is by the inimitable Ralph Steadman.

© Steve Bell

At the beginning of the year Theresa May visited Washington to hold hands with The Donald. This cartoon from Steve Bell on the ‘special relationship’. You can see more of Steve Bell’s favourite cartoons of the year on the Guardian website.

© Wilbur Dawbarn

June saw Mrs M making another bad decision in calling a snap election. Who’d of thunk this would turn Jeremy Corbyn into a headline act at Glastonbury! This on the election race by Private Eye regular Wilbur Dawbarn.

© Andy Davey

The election didn’t go too well for Theresa. Here’s Andy Davey on the costly deal she was forced to do with the DUP (from The Indy). Unsurprisingly the figures weren’t heralded on the side of a bus.

© Jeremy Banx

Russian cyber interference in overseas elections has been a big story in 2017. This cartoon by FT cartoonist Banx. (although this could easily be a drawing of The Daily Mail newsroom)

© Martin Rowson

In June we had the terrible fire at Grenfell Tower. This is Martin Rowson’s response in The Guardian on the Government hiding from responsibilities.

© Zoom Rockman

…another illustration on Grenville Tower by prodigious talent Zoom Rockman taken from Private Eye. ‘Things That Wouldn’t Happen’. Would the House of Parliament use cheap cladding for the renovation work?

© Ros Asquith

The NHS is still desperately underfunded. This was a very funny cartoon by Ros Asquith after doctors warned in July about Government plans for ‘brutal’ NHS cuts.

© Dave Brown

October started with the awful mass shooting in Las Vegas – one of many atrocities in 2017. This was Dave Brown’s reaction in the Independent.

© Sarah Boyce

In a year where it seems every male in a position of power is a sexual predator an excellent cartoon from Sarah Boyce in Private Eye

© Will McPhail

Workplace equality has also been an issue throughout the year. This perfectly summed up in a Private Eye cartoon by New Yorker regular Will McPhail.

© Steve Bright

We couldn’t review the whole year without mentioning B****t. Here’s a fine summing up of how negotiations are going by Brighty in The Sun.

© Royston Robertson

…we have though restricted ourselves to just two on the ‘B’ word. This corker by Royston published in Private Eye.

© Matthew Buck

Ok, that was an ‘alternative truth’ we now have three ‘B’ word cartoons, this from Matthew Buck for Tribune.

© Guy Venables

…and on the same subject word(s) of the year was ‘Fake News’. This take on it from Guy Venables in the Private Eye 2017 Annual.

© Steve Jones

Trump has recently been denying global warming again because the East Coast has had a bit of a heavy cold spell. Here’s a strip on Trump’s view on climate change by Jonesy (from Resurgence & Ecologist magazine)

© Mike Turner

Finally, on a rather apocalyptic note to end the year, this is from Mike Turner in The Spectator.

Happy New Year from the PCO…although I suspect 2018 will be another year of global calamity and abject misery – at least we’ll have plenty to draw cartoons about. 

The Round-up

October 28, 2013 in Events, General, Links, News

 

© Peter Steiner / Cartoonbank @Procartoonists.org

The cartoon above, by Peter Steiner, is understood to be the most popular ever to appear in The New Yorker. Journalist Glenn Fleishman talks to its creator and looks at what has happened in the 20 years since it first appeared.

Last Friday’s edition of The One Show dropped in on a host of the UK’s most high-profile political cartoonists – among them PCO members Martin Rowson and Steve Bright. Ben Jennings and Bob Moran were then invited to draw against the clock, live on air. Watch the episode on BBC iPlayer here (available until 6.29pm on Friday 1 November).

The BBC show neglected to mention that the cartoonists were appearing in connection with the launch of a new book, edited by Tim Benson. The Best of Britain’s Political Cartoons 2013 will be published on 7 November.

Two British institutions are looking back over their own histories with the use of cartoons. The National Theatre on London’s South Bank is showing a selection of cartoons in its Olivier exhibition space, as part of a celebration to mark its 50th anniversary. Across the river, the Bank of England is exhibiting classics from its own cartoon collection. National Theatre Lampoon and the Bank’s Cartoons & Caricatures are both completely free to visit. The NT show runs until 4 January, and the BoE display is open until 31 December.

For No Good Reason, Charlie Paul‘s documentary about PCO member and Gonzo icon Ralph Steadman, is to get an airing on Sky Atlantic next year.

Congratulations to Emily Haworth-Booth, who has won this year’s Observer/Cape/Comica Graphic Short Story Prize. And on the subject of prizes, Mike Barfield of Private Eye responds to his recent win at the Cartoon Art Trust Awards.

 

The Round-up

October 21, 2013 in Events, General, Links, News

© George Grosz @Procartoonists.org

George Grosz, the German satirical artist who has inspired so many of today’s cartoonists, is the subject of a new exhibition at the Richard Nagy gallery in London – the first retrospective of Grosz’s work to be held in the UK for almost 20 years. Read more about the show here.

Matt Pritchett of The Telegraph has been named Pocket Cartoonist of the Year for an impressive seventh time. Other winners at the Cartoon Art Trust‘s gala dinner on 17 October included Procartoonists.org member Kipper Williams (The Guardian), Peter Brookes (The Times), Peter Schrank (The Independent), and Mike Barfield (Private Eye). The Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to Nicholas Garland. Cartoonist Oliver Preston, who MC’d the ceremony and set up the Cartoon Art Trust Awards in 1995, has plenty more about the awards evening here. Congrats and kudos to all the winners.

Michael Maslin, a regular cartoonist for The New Yorker, asks his peers to reveal some of their most autobiographical gags and the inspiration behind them. Read the responses here.

We are sorry to note that James Sillavan (JAS) has died at the age of 63. His cartoons appeared in a wide variety of newspapers and magazines, notably The Guardian, The Observer, The Telegraph, The Financial Times, The Tablet and The Economist. The Guardian has a detailed obituary here.

An auction of original Giles cartoons has far exceeded estimates. Visit the BBC for more details and a short video.

And finally – looking for something special for the history buff in your life? PCOer Adrian Teal, himself something of an expert on the 18th Century, is one of the brains behind this ‘replica cundum’, which is being auctioned on behalf of Cancer Research UK. Go on – you know you want to.

The Round-up

July 8, 2013 in General, Links, News

Above: Cartoon editor Bob Mankoff on the anatomy of a New Yorker cartoon. Over at New Yorker HQ, Mankoff’s blog features a guest column about using cartoon captions in the classroom.

Several months after taking The Dandy purely digital, DC Thomson has suspended its existing app, saying that “the technology and format have let us down”. But the company has stressed that this is not the end of Britain’s longest-running comic.

A spokesperson said: “Discussions and planning are already under way to re-examine The Dandy’s digital offering. It is still too early to announce what form this next stage will take but we would like to reassure readers that The Dandy remains a very important part of the company’s plans for the future.”

We at Procartoonists.org will revisit the story when there is more to tell.

Meanwhile, the Dandy contributor Jamie Smart has taken the opportunity to voice his opinions about what could be done to strengthen the British comics industry.

In a timely slideshow, Howard Tayler, a webcomic creator, looks at how cartoonists can succeed in the digital world.

Jonathan Pugh, the regular pocket cartoonist for the Daily Mail and procartoonists member, has a new range of greetings cards available online. Click here to peruse them.

And finally, how much do you know about the humble pencil?

The Round-up

May 10, 2013 in Events, General, Links, News

© Christian Adams for The Telegraph @Procartoonists.org

The Premier League was rocked this week by the unexpected news of Sir Alex Ferguson‘s retirement, and cartoonists had a ball with it (sorry). In The Telegraph, Christian Adams put the news in context (above), while Matt Pritchett drew parallels with another recent shock resignation. Over in The Guardian, Kipper Williams considered the impact on industry. On the news that David Moyes is taking the reins, Procartoonists.org member Andy Davey pictures the handover in The Sun.

Rob Murray (full disclosure: the writer of this post!) will be opening up his studio to the public from 16-19 May, exhibiting and selling original cartoons from Private Eye, Reader’s Digest, The Spectator and elsewhere as part of the Summer Open Studios show at Wimbledon Art Studios. Entry is free and all are very welcome.

Stephen Collins celebrates the publication of his new book, The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil, with a launch party this evening at Gosh! in London. See preview pages in the ‘Big Comics’ section of his website.

Own-it offers a helpful and concise look at the ongoing controversial changes to UK copyright legislation, which pave the way for licensing of orphan works. Read it here.

An obituary for Margaret Groening reveals that her son – Simpsons creator Matt – believes in writing about what (or who) he knows. The Telegraph picks up on the story and provides this handy interactive family tree.

And finally, having recently challenged New Yorker cartoonists to a reverse-engineered caption contest, cartoon editor Bob Mankoff invites readers to have a go.

 

The Round-up

November 9, 2012 in General, Links, News

 

© Bruce Eric Kaplan/The New Yorker @Procartoonists.org

Bruce Eric Kaplan, the cartoonist and TV writer who signs his distinctive New Yorker cartoons as BEK (above), tells Co.Create about how day-to-day frustrations lead to many of his best ideas. Read the interview and see a selection of BEK’s work here. (Thanks to cartoonist Mike Lynch for the link.)

British comics artist Lew Stringer alerts us to some tweaks that have been made to The Beano this week – including a new run (geddit?) for Billy Whizz by Procartoonists.org member Wilbur Dawbarn. Wilbur had previously offered a teaser on his own blog.

Political cartoonist David Trumble looks back over several cartoons he devised to comment on the various possible outcomes of the Obama/McCain US presidential election four years ago, and offers his take on this week’s Obama/Romney vote. See them all here.

Also to coincide with polling day in the States, The New Yorker offers a selection of its election cartoons.

And finally, a striking and appropriate design has been chosen for the planned Comics and Animation Museum in Hangzhou, China. Take a look.

The Round-up

October 12, 2012 in General, Links, News

Ralph Steadman – the acclaimed cartoonist, Hunter S. Thompson collaborator and member of Procartoonists.org – is the subject of a new documentary film, which premieres at the BFI London Film Festival this evening. Watch the trailer of For No Good Reason, above, and read more about the film courtesy of Empire magazine.

Sticking with cinema, Charles Schulz‘s Peanuts characters are set to celebrate their 65th anniversary in 2015 by appearing in a new feature film.

Christian Adams of The Telegraph writes about the challenges that can arise for a topical cartoonist tackling daily newspaper deadlines, and reveals a cartoon that didn’t make it into print this week. Read the blog post here.

And finally, some entertaining pieces by New Yorker cartoon editor Bob Mankoff. In one, he looks at the importance of writing to the gag cartooning process, and Peter Steiner pitches in with his thoughts on making the transition from cartoonist to novelist. In another post, Mankoff offers some statistical advice to help you win the magazine’s caption contest.

The Round-up

September 14, 2012 in General, Links, News

© Mick Stevens/The New Yorker @ Procartoonists.org

A recent New Yorker cartoon by Mick Stevens, above, led to a temporary ban on the magazine’s Facebook page this week, because it apparently broke the social network’s decency rules. Bob Mankoff, the New Yorker’s cartoon editor, looks in detail at the supposed offence on his blog.

The latest collection of Punch artwork focuses on the full-colour, and often full-page, cartoons, illustrations and caricatures that graced the magazine’s pages throughout the 20th century. The Best of Punch Cartoons in Colour also features a large number of cover illustrations and artist biographies, and includes work by FougasseE H Shepard, Trog, Quentin Blake, Norman Thelwell and Procartoonists.org member Mike Williams, among many others.  See more here.

Kevin Kallaugher, political cartoonist for The Economist under his pen name KAL, provides an interesting overview of how his depictions of US leaders have changed as they have been weathered by their time in office (for similar insights from other cartoonists, see last week’s Round-up).

And finally, Forbidden Planet responds to a BBC report about the decline in reading among children, by calling on adults to help create new comic readers.

 

 

The Round-up

July 27, 2012 in General, Links, News

© Tom Humberstone @Procartoonists.org

As the 2012 Olympics get under way here in the UK, a piece of comics journalism by the cartoonist Tom Humberstone considers the negative impact that an event of this size can have on the host nation. Read the strip here.

New Olympics-themed works by Banksy have presented the London authorities with a dilemma. Meanwhile, The New Yorker offers a slideshow of its best Olympics gags.

Sticking with The New Yorker, a three-part blog entry by the cartoon editor Bob Mankoff takes a look back at a classic episode of Seinfeld – in which the characters struggle to “get” the magazine’s cartoons – to consider what’s funny and why. Read part one, part two and part three.

Terry Gilliam‘s daughter Holly is archiving her father’s work online, and has already unearthed some visual gems. Take a look here, and revisit for more treats as they are added.

As ever, please post any comments below.

© John Roberts @ Procartoonists.org

The Round-up

June 23, 2012 in General, Links, News

The final instalment of Life In Hell, © Matt Groening

Life In Hell, the long-running syndicated comic strip that first made a name for Simpsons creator Matt Groening, has come to an end after 32 years and a total of 1,669 installments. Read more about the strip and Groening’s decision to call time on it here, here or here.

A little under a year after his hands were broken in an assault by members of the Assad regime, the Syrian cartoonist Ali Ferzat is drawing again and appears in this moving video on The Guardian site.

In a piece for his New Yorker blog, cartoon editor Bob Mankoff looks at some of the seemingly innocuous cartoons published by the magazine that have nevertheless succeeded in causing offence.

The Mankoff post includes a case in which a cartoon was both attacked and defended on Facebook. Elsewhere on the social networking site, Procartoonists.org member Clive Goddard has discovered that one of his cartoons has drawn thousands of ‘likes’ and dozens of comments – check out the responses (and more importantly, the cartoon) here.